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Thread: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

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    Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    This is my first post on this forum! I've been a daily visitor for the past year, and have always been impressed with the wealth of information, as well as the civilized tone of the contributors.

    I am facing a dilemma, someone in town is selling a Hasselblad 500CM with a 40mm CF, 80 and 150, 3 backs, prism finder and a winder, all in excellent condition for the low price of $1400 US. I have to make up my mind today!

    My questions:
    1) Is there a future with such a system regarding digital?
    2) I already own a Canon 5D, which I plan to convert for IR and replace it with the Mark II; would a digital back on the Hasselblad be somewhat redundant ?
    3) I am not too happy with the result I get from my Epson V700 for 6x7 (Mamiya 7II + 65mm), but it is OK for 4x5. So, would it be better to stick with a 5D mark II for digital, and 4x5 for film (Sinar F2 and Chamonix), and skip the purchases of a better scanner and the 500CM ?
    4) Another consideration is that I love B&W and I am somewhat dissatisfied with what I get from digital, especially in the low values, which do not have the smoothness and tonal separation of film. There is also the dynamic range of B&W film, which is not match by the 5D. Do you find much improvements on those aspects with digital backs ?
    5) Last, there is the archival aspect; I still have my father's negatives dating from the early 50's. Will the raw digital files still be readable in 50 years ?

    Lots of questions and soul searching; any comment would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    François Audet

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    Sr. Administrator Jack's Avatar
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    First off, assuming it is all in good mechanical condition, that is an excellent package deal -- I'll buy it if you don't! Second, you did not mention what your specific use or type of shooting is -- IOW the above system will suck for sports or racing, but excel at landscape and studio...

    To answer your questions specifically:

    1) Yes, but not really much of one -- IOW you can mount a CFV back to it or any number of third-party backs, but you're stuck with manual focus and non-digital design lenses. Also note that "kit" is going to most friendly with one of the 16-22 MP backs. But for landscape, it will give you many years of excellent service.

    2) Nope. A 22MP back on the 500 with that glass will kill even a 1Ds3 or Sony900/Nikon D3x in terms of file quality. Of course it won't shoot as fast, focus or set exposure automatically, nor will it shoot at anywhere near as high an ISO.

    3) This is a tougher question. The V700 is an excellent scanner for a $500 flatbed, but it aint even in the same ballpark for scanning film as a dedicated film scanner. An Imacon or drum scanner are the best and will do large format, but they are large and expensive (probably on the order of $5K or more used). I use and like the Nikon 9000, an excellent intermediate choice for MF film and smaller at around $2000 new, but it won't do 4x5. (Do get the optional anti-newton glass MF neg carrier ~~$300 for it though!) At the end of the day, well scanned 4x5 or 5x7 is tough to beat for overall image quality, however, well-scanned MF is not too shabby either -- call it on par with 22MP direct digital capture. Since you have the Mamiya 7 and can get the Hassy kit so reasonably -- and given the Hassy can do digital and film -- I'd consider that and a Nikon 9000 before large format and the Imacon or Drum route.

    4) IMO only, film is still king of the realm for B&W. Digital can be excellent, but it doesn't have the full juice of a properly captured and processed piece of silver. In fact, B&W is THE reason I bought the Nikon 9000 -- I now carry a few film backs and some Tri-X and Portra whenever I'm out with my MF kit.

    5) Sure, as long as you store them and back them up properly to begin with. See the gear garage for LOTS of info and suggestions for long-term digital data storage.

    And welcome to the forum!
    Jack
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Thanks Jack for your advice. I've just sent a email to the the person selling the 500CM that I am buying it! I'll give the Nikon 9000 serious consideration.

    I enjoy landscape and studio photography, and prefer to use fixed manual lens with legible depth of field scales (a rarity these days!). I always use a tripod. I enjoy the contemplative and introspective aspect of photography, where the process is as important as the end result.

    Regards,

    François

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois_A View Post
    ... I'll give the Nikon 9000 serious consideration...
    If so, I recommend you join the :

    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/coolscan8000-9000/

    The user group will help you get started. Getting the best out of the scanner might mean making a modification to the Poorly designed scanner trays. There is also a way of doing 'wet' scanning with the 9000 to get optimum scans, I considered going that route myself but didn't want to breath in fluid fumes. I'm out of practice with scanning, but I previously found the yahoo Coolscan Group to be helpful and generous.

    Good luck.

    ............... Chris

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris C View Post
    Thanks Chris. I've joined the group, and there is a wealth of information!

    I took delivery of the 500CM last night. What a beauty, everything is in perfect condition. Manual focussing with those Zeiss lenses is pure Nirvana! The depth of field scales are so legible, and one can focus precisely with the waist level finder and the magnifying loupe. One can lock the exposure value and rotate the shutter speed and aperture rings at the same time; by comparison, I find the two wheels on the Canon so unintuitive in manual mode. A Mirror lock-up that doe not require a trip to the custom functions submenu; wow!

    I suddenly realized how much was lost in ergonomics in the past 25 years with our auto-everything cameras. It was also interesting to compare the users guides: the Hasselblad' guide is very well illustrated and only 40 pages, while my Canon G10 for instance, is 300 pages, plus an 80 pages Software Starter Guide, and a 77 pages Direct Print User Guide!

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Congratulations. I still find the V system to be THE classical MF camera.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Welcome to the Hasselblad V club Francois!

    I've used a V camera for all of my adult life, they just keep going and going. Most every digital back made will work on your camera, but there's just something extra about the V when shooting film.

    Here are a few sites to explore:


    http://www.hasselbladinfo.com/forum/...play.php?f=136


    http://www.hasselbladinfo.com/forum/...8947#post28947



    http://www.hasselblad.com/planet-v/start.aspx



    http://www.camerapedia.org/wiki/Hasselblad


    Enjoy your camera, and for a nice selection of films visit:


    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/c403-B...0-and-220-size

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Congrats on your purchase. FWIW, I use the Rollei system as another film based system. Scanned film is pretty hard to compete with, but with a digital back also, you can have the best of both. Try finding a used Imacon 3xx scanner (I can't remember the exact number, but its for 6x6 up to 6x12). Makes amazingly good scans, like 4x5 prints. Captures nuance very well.

    Enjoy - and if you have the need for the digital back, the CF22 is no slouch and will give you lots of operating pleasure as well. No need for the newest and greatest - unless you plan to print larger than ....well, let's say 20 x 24?

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    To be honest, I am considering selling my 22mp digital back. I just find that I prefer film for medium format. I thought it would make my life easier and give me better results, but I find it a pain in the ***, and the results from film scans are better (to my eye). If I want digital, I go for the D3 or the M8, they seem to do it a lot better than the back that I have (not the resolution or dynamic range, but everything else).

    And frankly, the cost to benefit ratio for anything other than professional studio shooting is really out of whack. You got a 500cm, 40mm, 80mm and 150mm, 3 backs and other things for 1400 dollars -- the 40mm alone is worth more than that, but in any case, you got an insane deal. I also got a really great deal on my medium format digital system, but the 22mp back (latest version) was still 10,000 dollars. And I am not sure it will take better pictures...in fact, I have seen little evidence that it does from my own shooting.

    I am not sure why I am posting this here...I guess just because I think film in medium format still offers me everything I want in a picture -- I have no criticisms of the image quality whatsoever. If I need to do a job where things must get done, no matter what, I will grab the D3, but barring that I think film is really what works best for me.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Stuart is the back and software just too much hassle or not liking the whole process of it.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    I am not sure how much of it is the back and software (though clearly, they are not for the faint of heart), but I think the bulk of it is the whole MF digital experience. I find the color and the tonal range of film to be more to my liking. I don't like squashed 645, I prefer 6x6 and 6x7. I just find that film gives me results I like, and the medium format digital that I have does not. And I will say that I honestly don't think it is the particular brand or software that is the cause of it. I think it is the nature of the beast. I should ad that most of the software work I have done with it have been in lightroom and in capture one. The back itself has operated flawlessly, it's just that I don't really like the results. And there is the extra weight (it weighs a lot more than a film back), carrying along batteries, base ISO being 25 (though stated as 50), and anything above that gains noise very quickly, having a maximum exposure time of 30 seconds, having to worry about running out of storage space, having to find space to archive all those huge files (rather than just scanning the ones you need when you need them) and so forth. It does not help that I really like being in the black and white darkroom.

    Anyway, I may hold out for the moment, as I am mostly interested in location work and there is basically no light this time of year, which makes it a no brainer to reach for the D3 on location shoots right now.
    Last edited by Stuart Richardson; 14th December 2008 at 08:51.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Thanks everyone for the warm welcome to the "Hasselblad V club"!
    Marc, thanks for all the links.
    Stuart, I love your web site! What kind of scanner do you use with film?

    For the price of a MF Digital back, one could get a new Hasselblad X5 scanner, which could also scan 4x5.
    For someone like me, with very low volume, that could be an alternative.

    An area where film does very well is long exposure. I seem to get better result with film when I use a 100X ND filter than with the 5D. Michael Kenna, for instance, uses exposures lasting hours with his Hasselblad 500. Could it be done with a DB?

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Thanks Francois -- I use an Imacon 646, which is the precursor to the Hasselblad X1. I bought it several years ago, and I think it does a great job, though at times I would love the diffusor and extra speed of the 949!

    Long exposure is a toss up, depending on how long you mean. For up to a couple of minutes, I think digital has the edge -- no reciprocity and you get instant confirmation that the exposure was correct. Cameras like the D3 can be used really effectively at ISO 800 or more, allowing you to use smaller f/stops and still get enough light. The downside is that they eat batteries as they expose, and they build noise, which needs to be subtracted with a darkframe that takes the same time as the exposure. Film with a mechanical camera require no batteries at all, no dark frame subtraction, and no build up of noise. On the downside, you have reciprocity effect, which means the less light you have and the longer you expose, the more time it takes to achieve the proper exposure. Some films are really good about this (Acros for example), others are very poor.

    As far as I know, the only back maker with unlimited long exposure is Phase One. My sinar topped out at 30 seconds.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    There are other reasons to like film - the analog system (which film is) has the advantage of incredibly easy and concise data retrieval: File the negs by number or date, organize the contact sheets as you wish, and voila: ten years from now, easy to find. No need to update, back up, etc. Its a rather remarkable, and unheralded advantage.

    For the amateur (as opposed to the pro) the advantage of digital is are a few: of course, the speed of feedback: instant information, more or less; then the self-processing advantage - no need to fool with finding a lab to process the film. Note the labs are getting harder to find, and the techs are less capable than they were some years ago.

    But I think the best advantage of digital is the ability to take essentially cost-free risk. You can shoot anything, take a look, throw it out, and there you are. You can go out on a limb, explore ideas you might otherwise hesitate about.

    And film, by the way, isn't quite so cheap. My local lab is about $12 for processing 120 BW, the same for a proof sheet, and then again for some 8 mb scans. So its $2-3 per shot, not to mention the film cost. While there are cheaper and probably better services if one ships, my one experience left me with a rather unhappy taste in the development side. Not so good. Maybe it was the lab, but somehow I don't like shipping the film anywhere....

    I've picked up an older dp20 for the Rollei and still getting used to it. But the advantages of MF, the ability to use the WLF and really get vertical alignment and cropping correct, are wonderful to still use. Just one person's thoughts.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    What a great buy!!! Get a used copy of "The Hasselblad Manual" 5th edition by Wildi..It is fun to read and very useful for people starting out with the "V" system.

    Steve

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    And film, by the way, isn't quite so cheap. My local lab is about $12 for processing 120 BW, the same for a proof sheet, and then again for some 8 mb scans. So its $2-3 per shot, not to mention the film cost. While there are cheaper and probably better services if one ships, my one experience left me with a rather unhappy taste in the development side. Not so good. Maybe it was the lab, but somehow I don't like shipping the film anywhere....
    Geoff, processing B&W is really easy, and one does not need a darkroom; I do it in a small bathroom. You save a lot, and you have control on developer choice (high contrast, low contrast, high-definition, fine-grain, etc.)

    I have just purchased The Darkroom Cookbook by Steve Anchell, and I find it fascinating how much control one can achieve when one starts to mix the basic chemicals. I am going to experiment with divided developers (for their compensating effect) and with pyro (very sharp edges and delicate highlights). My objective is to produce negatives that are easy to scan.

    On can scan 6 neg (6x6) at a time on an Epson V700, and generating contact sheet/proof is easy with Lightroom or Photoshop>Automate>Contact Sheet.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Is there any advantage of the V750 over the V700? Can someone add some numbers on a comparison between the V700/V750 and something like a Nikon 8000/9000?
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Is there any advantage of the V750 over the V700? Can someone add some numbers on a comparison between the V700/V750 and something like a Nikon 8000/9000?
    The V750 is supposed to have an APO lens while the 700 doesn't? The Nikon 9000 is faster (by a lot) than the 8000 and is a current product with current support. The 9000 is LED light-source (very stable and supposedly superior for scanning B&W) and FW400 connectivity, not sure about the 8000 but i think it's a fluorescent light.

    The big difference between the 8000/9000 and the Epson flatbeds is D-Max --- you get e *lot* more light into the shadows with the dedicated film scanner.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Congratulations Francois - enjoy!

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois_A View Post
    Geoff, processing B&W is really easy, and one does not need a darkroom; I do it in a small bathroom. You save a lot, and you have control on developer choice (high contrast, low contrast, high-definition, fine-grain, etc.)

    I have just purchased The Darkroom Cookbook by Steve Anchell, and I find it fascinating how much control one can achieve when one starts to mix the basic chemicals. I am going to experiment with divided developers (for their compensating effect) and with pyro (very sharp edges and delicate highlights). My objective is to produce negatives that are easy to scan.

    On can scan 6 neg (6x6) at a time on an Epson V700, and generating contact sheet/proof is easy with Lightroom or Photoshop>Automate>Contact Sheet.
    You are right, I'm sure. However years ago, my BW processing had more dust on the film than not, and just kind of soured me on the whole thing. Perhaps its time to revisit. On the ohter hand, there is the stack of images, negs and files, yet to be printed, and since I'm the bottleneck, adding more to the plate isn't the best idea! Bu if you're doing processing, keep going. More hands on is better.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Is there any advantage of the V750 over the V700? Can someone add some numbers on a comparison between the V700/V750 and something like a Nikon 8000/9000?
    I found this link quite informative.

    http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/int...700/page_1.htm

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    The 750 review is very informative, especially the comparison with the Nikon 9000. I have heard that the Epson was good before, but I didn't realise that it came that close. This is like the whole 5D2 vs. MF discussion all over again, on a different level I suppose I will look closer at the Epson, since I only going to use it for old negatives and possibly some experimental work, mostly MF film.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    FWIW Carsten, I had the Epson flatbed first and have both scanners now --- and the reason is, they aint that close
    Jack
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Hmm. Do you get better results with the 9000 than he did, or worse results with the 750?
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Richardson View Post
    As far as I know, the only back maker with unlimited long exposure is Phase One. My sinar topped out at 30 seconds.
    Not unlimited. Phase P+ will produce a beautiful image for 20 minutes to 11 hours depending on the temperature. At 63F it can produce a beautiful image up to 1 hour, which is the spec most frequently cited. For extremely long exposure film is still the king.

    Doug Peterson, Head of Technical Services
    Capture Integration, Phase One & Canon Dealer | Personal Portfolio

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois_A View Post
    Thanks Chris. I've joined the group, and there is a wealth of information!

    I took delivery of the 500CM last night. What a beauty, everything is in perfect condition. Manual focussing with those Zeiss lenses is pure Nirvana! The depth of field scales are so legible, and one can focus precisely with the waist level finder and the magnifying loupe. One can lock the exposure value and rotate the shutter speed and aperture rings at the same time; by comparison, I find the two wheels on the Canon so unintuitive in manual mode. A Mirror lock-up that doe not require a trip to the custom functions submenu; wow!
    I remember when I first saw the EV-lock-and-twist design of the hasselblad lenses. True genius.

    Doug Peterson, Head of Technical Services
    Capture Integration, Phase One & Canon Dealer | Personal Portfolio

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    FWIW Carsten, I had the Epson flatbed first and have both scanners now --- and the reason is, they aint that close
    I'd have to agree with you Jack. I still have a Epson V750 Pro which is great for scanning contact sheets. It does a respectable job on 6X6+ negs IF ... big IF ... the film isn't challenging. You really can be fooled if you don't have something to directly compare it to. In my case it was the Minolta MF scanner that cleared up any confusion.

    The way my dealer convinced me to step up my game even further was to lend me an Imacon 848 for a month. When the even better, faster Imacon 949 was discounted due to rebadging/repackaging it as an X5, I sprung for that.

    Net result is that I ended up going back and rescanning everything over again.

    Here's a tip, the V750 is well worth the money for scanning B&W silver prints. I had many prints where I couldn't locate the negs (in a storage box somewhere), you can actually pull digitally corrected files that are better than the originals.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Thanks for the comments, Marc. So... "challenging" means what, exactly, badly exposed or perhaps large dynamic range?

    I am not considering spending several thousand on a film scanner right now, so I am wondering if the 750 will give me satisfactory results from most negatives, ie. good enough to make a decent print, mostly B&W? I am not expecting the best possible results here, but I also don't want blocked up shadows, blown highlights or lacking tonality.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    I just scanned this 20 year old Provia slide on my V700 to (hopefully) indicate its ability. Original image shot on a Mamiya RZ. It'll do me for the price!

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Thanks for the comments, Marc. So... "challenging" means what, exactly, badly exposed or perhaps large dynamic range?

    I am not considering spending several thousand on a film scanner right now, so I am wondering if the 750 will give me satisfactory results from most negatives, ie. good enough to make a decent print, mostly B&W? I am not expecting the best possible results here, but I also don't want blocked up shadows, blown highlights or lacking tonality.
    The D-Max on the Epson is a fudged number, so don't be misled by it. As I said, the 750V Pro does do a respectable job, but struggles with shadow detail in dense negs.

    And I've noted that there is a difference in sharpness which can be attributed to any number of things ... don't know what lens is used in the Epson, but the one in my Imacon is a Rodenstock ... and film flatness can be an issue that affects sharpness. When you do really high rez scans with the flatbed it takes forever and the film can heat up and POP. The V750 Pro comes with a glass fluid mount holder, but I don't know how it works and have never used it.

    The Epson software probably isn't the best to accomplish what you are after. There are a number of other choices like Silverfast, but others here may be of more help on that subject since it's been so long since I've used anything other than Flexclor with my Imacon.

    If you are using traditional B&W films be aware that the "Ice" dust/scratch removal options do not apply. It cannot be used with traditional B&W emulsions. It does work with C41 B&W films. Dust is an issue with flatbeds because the light is very specular. This is true for a number of dedicated scanners also. Users of MF Minolta Multiscan units resorted to inventing a diffusion light source which did wonders (that scanner now has cult following, and if you could find one it'd be about $800-$1,000.) The Imacon 949 already has a diffused light source, and the scans look more like the results you'd get from a traditional enlarger.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Hmm. Do you get better results with the 9000 than he did, or worse results with the 750?
    The biggest difference is in shadow detail and specifically with B&W negatives -- the two scanners are eons apart in that situation, like 2 or more stops more usable range in the shadows. Detail in well exposed areas is about what he shows, though I would say the 9000 does notably better than he showed if you do a 4-pass scan. You can even eek a bit more with a 16-pass scan from the 9000, but to me it usually is not worth the added time required over the 4-pass -- nice to have the 16-pass capabilities if you need it though.

    One of the biggest benefits to the 9000 IMO is the extra IR channel for dust removal. I use VueScan to run my scanners, and the IR dust removal protocol of VueScan in conjunction with the dedicated IR channel of the 9000 generates a super clean scan -- WAYYYY better than Nikon's ICE -- so clean I maybe have to remove 4 or 5 larger dusts from a 6x7 neg and that is it. (Yes, it is really that good!)

    Like Marc, I do use the flatbed for a quick scan contact sheet of an entire page of negs or tranny's --- and frankly, having the flatbed is worth it for that capability alone! And also agree with Marc, that scanning an 8x10 print from a tough neg on the flatbed definitely generates a superior file to scanning the tough neg on the flatbed -- again, the benefits of a dedicated film scanner get huge when you work with a tough negative or tranny.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Is it possible to scan more than once with different exposures and combine them for more shadow detail, like an HDR capture?
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Most scanners only have one exposure setting. The imacons allow you to use "adaptive light" which gives you a brighter scan tube (or maybe just a longer exposure, I am not sure). I am not sure if the epsons can do this.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Is it possible to scan more than once with different exposures and combine them for more shadow detail, like an HDR capture?
    You can do a form of HDR multi-scan scan with VueScan and the 9000, but I've never needed to use it, so never experimented with it...
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Heh, I wanted to do it with the V750 to avoid having to get a 9000
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Oh I get it... Well, seems it might be pretty easy to do two separate scans, one for the shadows, another for the highlights. But it isn't an exposure adjustment per se, rather playing with the curves to pump the shadows. Since this is a file gain operation, it will likely increase noise. But since you don't need to move a holder, they should line up easily enough in CS where you can layer and blend them. Lot of work, but you can probably gain a stop or so of DR...
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    It seems that if the shadows are the main disadvantage with the V750, and if this is only in "challenging" shots, and if it is possible to get a 1-stop improvement with the V750 with your trick, then there is a cheaper way of getting most of the results, as long as one is willing to work more to compensate. I will meditate on this
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    I have not used the V750 myself, but I will comment about a general feature of scanners. Generally what you pay for going up the scale is moderately better resolution, better software, greater dynamic range, better out of the box files and much greater speed. My scanner journey went from Minolta Scan Dual III to Scan Multi Pro to Imacon 646. The Scan Dual III did pretty well with 35mm, but only up to 2820dpi. The Scan Multi Pro went to 4800dpi and did really well in terms of resolution. Color was a bit difficult to get perfect, particularly with color negative. It was quite slow, especially with multi-pass scans. You needed the glass carrier to get edge to edge sharpness on medium format. Overall it is a great scanner and I highly recommend it if you can find one.
    The Imacon is leaps and bounds faster, resolution is quite similar, though it has more bite to the detail (and no ICE). It does dramatically better with color negative, has great edge to edge sharpness without a glass carrier, has greater dynamic range and scans up to 4x5 in any type of carrier you want, you can custom order them.

    Anyway, the general point is that the more you pay, the faster they go and the less work you have to do.
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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    My experience with the Epson V700, which is supposedly as good as the V750 regarding dynamic range, is that when I do a scan for the shadows, any highlights bloom into the dark values, and this is a major PITA to mask in Photoshop! Still, I can not retrieve all the shadows details that are clearly visible when the slide is on a light table.

    I am just wondering, if the 9000 and the Imacon are able to retrieve the shadow details visible with a light table without clipping the highlights?

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    It seems that if the shadows are the main disadvantage with the V750, and if this is only in "challenging" shots, and if it is possible to get a 1-stop improvement with the V750 with your trick, then there is a cheaper way of getting most of the results, as long as one is willing to work more to compensate. I will meditate on this
    It's not just the shadow detail. Sorry, but you can do every trick in the book with a flatbed, and a beat-up old Polaroid Sprint Scan will beat it.

    Spending $$$$ on MF and good lenses to get the best we can and then scanning with flatbed doesn't make sense ... unless the end use isn't that important. IMO, buy a used dedicated film scanner.

    People that swear by a flatbed are usually people that have never used a dedicated scanner so they don't know what's possible from their films.

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    Re: Advice on Hasselblad 500CM purchase

    I have not used the 9000 (much...I have used it ICP, but I do not own one), but the Imacon can. Generally the best way to scan is to scan extremely flat, don't clip either the highlights or shadows in the scan, and then edit the file as required in photoshop, if necessary using masks.

    I have posted this photo everywhere, but it is the best example of an imacon scan I have. This was from a fairly flat negative, (Acros in rodinal, semi-stand), but the Imacon was able to get a great tonal range.


    And a 100% crop at 3200dpi, unsharpened. This is above the head of the figure at left.


    for comparison, here is a scan from the Minolta Scan Multi Pro at 4800 dpi. Both photos were taken with 80mm lenses of very high quality (Hasselblad and Mamiya 7)





    Either scanner will make call you on your technique. If you are not perfect, they will show the softness. I believe the softer image in the second photo is a function of the scanner (a bit), but more of the different circumstances of the shots. The 1st was at f/22 (think, it would be even sharper if it were at f/8!) on a tripod, and the second was handheld at probably 1/250th or 1/500th and f/5.6 or so.
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