Site Sponsors
Results 1 to 42 of 42

Thread: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Is there anyone out there stitching photos with a MF digital back? I know the answer is yes however I'd like to see some and understand how your doing it (software, back, camera, etc)?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1,538
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    There are two general techniques; 1) use pano head which you turn and 2) stitch using a tech camera and shift the back so you stitch inside the lens image circle.

    Typically you choose pano head if you want a cylindrical projection (often nice for landscape panoramas) and inside lens image circle if you want a rectalinear projection (architecture etc), but as any good panorama software can change projection it does not really matter.

    Many prefer stitching inside the image circle as it's more "direct", the only thing you do with stitching is simulating a larger sensor area. You must have a technical camera and a lens with a large high quality image circle though.

    An advantage with the pano head technique is that you will use the center area of the lens only, ie the highest quality part, and you don't need a technical camera.

    When it comes to pano heads I myself prefer one with click stops (nodal ninja for example), but if you only stitch a few images in one row into your panorama any head with panning function like the Arca Swiss Cube or D4 will do.

    With the panoramic head and close objects you must carefully tune the nodal point to avoid parallax problems. You'll need one setting for each lens you are using. This is possible (I've done it), and with this you can multi-row stitch tight architecture scenes and stitch into a perfectly rectalinear rendering. Many have not learnt how to tune the nodal point though and thus give up on the pano head and stitch inside the image circle instead, so you may hear things like "pano head is no good due to parallax problems", but with the proper head and tuning it's not.

    If you end up stitching a lot of images I feel that "why am I using expensive MF gear for this, when I could stitch using a DSLR with a few more images?". If you like me have "ancient" MF gear and use a tech cam with mechanical shutter (cock for each image) the workflow is slow enough that DSLR stitching is smoother even if you need to stitch more images. So for tech cam stitching I would rather not stitch more than 3-4 frames in a single row, and that is what people typically do. For really large multi-row stitches I prefer DSLR-based solutions.

    There's a real expert on high end MF stitching on this forum though, gerald.d. He's done a lot of impressive panorama stitching with the IQ180.
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  3. #3
    Senior Member alajuela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Shanghai / Miami
    Posts
    552
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    124

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Hi

    As Torger explained - there is an easy way to find the Nodal Point (Entrance Pupil) - if your are not using a tech / view camera and shifting the back.

    Go to RRS web site

    Really Right Stuff-Contact Us

    and download the current catalog and then go to page 98. You don't need their equipment, but you can get the general idea. You will need a slide on a pano head so that you can move the camera back so it pivots on the nodal point.

    The Pano head sits between the camera and the tripod head, and rotates. This is once you level the tripod the camera rotates level to the ground and your pano stays +/- straight.

    Allow yourself about 1/3 of a frame overlap. Set the camera on manual, (focus, WB, exposure) so all the frames are exactly the same.

    Make sure you process all the shots with the same settings, - do not crop any of the individual frames. Photoshop does a decent job of stitching. You will probably have to crop slightly when finished.

    When stitched you can fine tune the finished image.

    On my web site you can see some panos, (they are not landscapes but the technique is the same) on page two - Category "Shanghai Parks" the first 8 shots are panos. Also the Category "Shanghai Bund" the first 3 shots of the Bund are Panos (about 9 - 11 shots).

    Enjoy - take your time (but not too much time once you start a series of shots) - stay level!! Again enjoy!!

    Phil

    ps. I have found the wide lenses are more problematic, in MF terms about 60mm and below. they are more difficult when shooting on the nodal point. Also moving subjects are more of a challenge.
    Last edited by alajuela; 2nd September 2013 at 02:16.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I have created many panos using the 645D and a pano head set-up from RRS mounted on a Cube and found, with care, that very good results can be achieved - even with multiple rows of shots and a wide angle lens.

    I certainly feel that doing this with MF is worthwhile - compiling it all and realising the quality that is achieved as a result is very pleasing (though does require some computing power in some cases).

    Here are some examples (some of which are done without a pano head - you don't always need to be too controlled if there isn't anything too close to the camera or the foreground detail isn't too 'geometric' in nature):

    PanoFromFiles_IGP5250-6Step10sRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP1271-81(Not73and76and80)Step7SpotSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    JoinedPanosBetween(5857and58and60-62and64-66)and(5851-3and55and56)Step12SMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    ConstructedFileStep15ReduceTo60InchesAcrossSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFrom_IGP6196-6257Step4SSsRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFrom_IGP6456-61And6465-7Step5sRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFrom_IGP7431-40Step5sRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFrom_IGP7786-89Step7CropSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFrom_IGP7756-62Step10Crop3SMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP3741-48Step6(PS)sRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP5864-90V1Step6sRGBSHSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP3144-79Step6sRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP6184-87Step8sRGBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP6426-35Step10FlatSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP9491-9502(AllFiles)Step7FlatSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles5083-5085Step7CropSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP7632-9Plus41And43And45And46And49And50Step7FlatSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP3203-13Step6CropSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP8898-8903(UsingLighterLHFiles)Step8CBSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromFiles_IGP1686-93Step14FlatSMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFromLayeredVersionsOf_IGP9512-35Step6sRGBATTEMPT3SMALL | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    PanoFrom_IGP3419And3425And3428Step9sRGBMODERATE | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
    Likes 5 Member(s) liked this post

  5. #5
    Senior Member alajuela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Shanghai / Miami
    Posts
    552
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    124

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ed HUrst View Post
    I have created many panos using the 645D and a pano head set-up from RRS mounted on a Cube and found, with care, that very good results can be achieved - even with multiple rows of shots and a wide angle lens.

    I certainly feel that doing this with MF is worthwhile - compiling it all and realising the quality that is achieved as a result is very pleasing (though does require some computing power in some cases).

    Here are some examples (some of which are done without a pano head - you don't always need to be too controlled if there isn't anything too close to the camera or the foreground detail isn't too 'geometric' in nature):

    Nice shots Ed
    Philip
    www.pg-pg.com
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  6. #6
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Thanks Philip

  7. #7
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Shashin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    4,503
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    141

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I do a great deal of stitched panos with the 645D handheld. I find only when you have near objects like being in a forest is a pano head needed.

    My "pano head" is simply an Arca Swiss P0 and Manfrotto macro rail.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Absolutely Will - me too (on the handheld thing). Modern software does a super job with this in the right circumstances, even where the point of rotation is very approximate and stuff changes quite a bit between frames. I wouldn't do it in a forest or (as I was recently shooting) inside a large building with staircases, balustrades and linear patterns on floor tiles going off in all directions!

  9. #9
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    32 31' 37.06" N, 111 6' 0.9" W
    Posts
    4,334
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Short answer is yes. The slightly longer answer is with both a Df and tech camera with the tech camera being my primary.

    Arrived in Jackson Hole WY for our yearly fall shoot and hope to get at least one more new panorama this year using the WRS and IQ160.
    Don Libby
    Iron Creek Photography
    Blog
    Tucson AZ

  10. #10
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    4,043
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1253

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    here's a tip:
    shoot panos from left to right; then when you line up the images before merging they appear in the right order
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  11. #11
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Here's another one:
    If shooting panos at sunset, shoot from the darkest part of the scene towards the lightest (i.e. towards the sun) - that way, the tendency of the scene to get darker (as the sun sets) works in your favour in terms of making the exposure closer to constant across the scene. With sunrise, do the opposite (shoot from the lighter part of the scene towards the darker part - i.e. away from the sun).
    Probably only matters if you are doing quite a few shots in the sequence or each exposure is fairly long, but every little helps!

  12. #12
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    32 31' 37.06" N, 111 6' 0.9" W
    Posts
    4,334
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I shoot mine totally manual, turn off auto focus, shoot M, choosing the f/spot and shutter speed before hand. In other words turn anything that's auto off so each file is shoot the same.
    Don Libby
    Iron Creek Photography
    Blog
    Tucson AZ

  13. #13
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Hi Don,

    I do the same - all manual. But I still find it helpful to the stitch, if there is a stark difference in light levels around the scene, to use this approach to even things out a bit. Not a deal-breaker though.

    All the best,

    Ed

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    "2) stitch using a tech camera and shift the back so you stitch inside the lens image circle."

    When you make Panos this way, do you have to adjust focus in every picture you take ?

    Thanks a lot

    Luis

  15. #15
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    32 31' 37.06" N, 111 6' 0.9" W
    Posts
    4,334
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Ed you've got to be willing to break rules every once in a while. Knowing which rules and when helps in getting the final product. I remember doing a 5-shot pano 3-different settings and using 1-from each in the final product.
    Don Libby
    Iron Creek Photography
    Blog
    Tucson AZ

  16. #16
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Absolutely Don - couldn't agree more... I often bracket sequences in the same way and have been known to select shots from different exposures around the scene. I just find it helpful to try and smooth things out like this as well - but in the end, at the processing stage, I do whatever is required. I simply view the shooting stage as getting me the material I need - as close to the final required outcome as feasible.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,069
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    83

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I do both. DF on RRS or Flat-stitch with RM3Di. You'd also be amazed at what the latest software like APG or even CS6 can do with hand-held pano shots, normal hand-held shutter speeds required of course.

    Don't have a flat stitched image handy on my laptop right now, but here are a couple of pano stitches.Both files are massive, can print 6-7ft wide at 300dpi:


    Hand-held - DF/IQ260 Achromatic/80LS


    RRS Pano Head, D800 IR/Coastal optics 60mm
    Likes 3 Member(s) liked this post

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,069
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    83

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Incidentally, you'll see a common problem, lens vignetting in pano stitches. In the first image, you can see some vertical funnel type things. If I were properly processing these, it would take some work in PS.

    Flat-stiching avoids some of this, but has other limitations like, number of frames you can have, not using the center of the lens, LCCs not matching etc.

    Life is full of compromises.
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  19. #19
    Senior Member alajuela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Shanghai / Miami
    Posts
    552
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    124

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by celina20 View Post
    "2) stitch using a tech camera and shift the back so you stitch inside the lens image circle."

    When you make Panos this way, do you have to adjust focus in every picture you take ?

    Thanks a lot

    Luis
    Hello Luis

    You should not have to refocus, think of it this way -- You are now making a capture of a larger image circle, - you sensor just got larger.

    Thanks

    Phil
    Philip
    www.pg-pg.com
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Thanks a lot Phil. It's clear for me now.

    Luis

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    398
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Hi, I use an Arca Swiss RM3Di with a Rodenstock 40mm HR lens and a IQ160 back and shift the back 15mm left and right for a simple 2 shot pano. Here is an example I did just a few weeks ago using this technique. The detail on the file is just ridiculous. Good enough for a 6ft wide print that you can stick your nose to it.
    Likes 2 Member(s) liked this post

  22. #22
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    As expected, the images are great!

    Is anyone running HRD or focus stacking to get these shots?

    I hear so much that you need the "Lou Ferrigno" of computeres to process these files. What sort of systems are preferred and what kind of processing time is required?

  23. #23
    Senior Member alajuela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Shanghai / Miami
    Posts
    552
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    124

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by STCameras View Post
    As expected, the images are great!

    Is anyone running HRD or focus stacking to get these shots?

    I hear so much that you need the "Lou Ferrigno" of computeres to process these files. What sort of systems are preferred and what kind of processing time is required?
    On my Shanghai Bund photos, the night Pano (the other two were straight one exposure shots) was shot with exposure bracketing to recover the some of the lit high lights. It is hard to see on the small jpg. After I had the pano stitched, I went back and took an underexposed frame and masked in the details.

    There are no blown out highlights in the image. If I remember correctly nothing higher than 248- 248 - 248. Shadows nothing lower than 7-7-7. I did help myself by shooting as soon as they turned on the lights - late dusk.

    In simple terms get a s**t load of RAM. I have 24G dram3 - wish I had more. Also get a good video card, the Nvida Quardo cards are good.

    One thing for me which was not mentioned, is doing local adjustments is a challenge on a pano at 100% on the screen. A 3 or 4 shot pano is not as hard -can be treated as a normal shot. It has to look correct in parts and as a whole. Also need to check for ghosting when you have multi shot pano, with moving details.

    The Shanghai Bund have printed 2 meters wide, no problem. You can see people on the boardwalk.

    Thanks

    phil
    Last edited by alajuela; 3rd September 2013 at 03:05.

  24. #24
    Member pedro39photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    95
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    amazing work Ed HUrst !!!! great light

  25. #25
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by pedro39photo View Post
    amazing work Ed HUrst !!!! great light

    Thanks Pedro - that is great to hear :-)

  26. #26
    Workshop Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    4,043
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1253

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    in several instances, I have had much much better results merging with autopano giga 2.6 than withe CS5.1; in particular, the assembling in CS would produce barrel distortion-like crops that did not happen with autopano. more files than three or four also better with autopano

    2009 MacPro, 2x2.26Ghz quad core, with 24G 1066Ghz Dram; Nvidia GeForce GT 120 512MB
    OSX 10.8.4, two monitors

    files are panos from IQ160, and have assembled as many as ten shots

  27. #27
    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    5,803
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    564

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    in several instances, I have had much much better results merging with autopano giga 2.6 than withe CS5.1; in particular, the assembling in CS would produce barrel distortion-like crops that did not happen with autopano. more files than three or four also better with autopano

    2009 MacPro, 2x2.26Ghz quad core, with 24G 1066Ghz Dram; Nvidia GeForce GT 120 512MB
    OSX 10.8.4, two monitors

    files are panos from IQ160, and have assembled as many as ten shots
    John,

    NOW I know what's happening when the list dim in Lower Manhattan!

    I use a similar outfit, although 2008 2x4 3Ghz and it works fine although limited to OS X 10.7. Similarly I find that most of the time PS CS6 does a good job with panos but sometimes I just have to use autopano giga with problematic images. The difference can be quite noticeable when needed.

    I tend to do flat stitches with my Alpa & IQ and try to keep to established ratios such as 6x12 or 6x17 where possible. I think aesthetically these work well.

    These days I tend to shoot most panos on film with my XPan II or Fuji 617. Scanning & spotting is a bigger pain than assembling digital images obviously but for some scenes a single capture is better. For some scenes I will just shoot with my Alpa & Rodie 23 and crop. I seldom run out of resolution, especially when considering realistic sized prints.

    Focus stack and pano builds - yes sometimes when needed. The main thing is to be systematic about taking the shots and marking the beginning and end of each set with a dark frame. You also have to add in the time for LCCs as well to the pano set. I will LCC each image file in the pano / focus stack first, and then focus stack in Helicon Focus each pano 'panel' and then finally combine the panels in CS6/CS or autopano. This way any pano distortions apply to a flattened focus stack and so there's less likelihood of different scene distortions causing problems which you could have if you merge the scene into different depth panos and then focus stack process the pano. YMMV.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"

  28. #28
    Senior Member Ed Hurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    PTGui is also excellent, giving many options for the projection, great controllability regarding alignment and the ability to save a particular project as a template and apply it to another set of files (useful when you have bracketed files and want the different sets of files to align identically).

    2009 Mac Pro with 32GB of RAM.

    I have stitched as many as 60 files before shot with a 645D (that takes many hours to compile based on 16-bit TIFFs).

  29. #29
    Senior Member ondebanks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    518
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I've done both handheld and tripod MFD panos...just a few. Lack of opportunity, rather than lack of inspiration!

    One slightly unusual thing I've done is to mount the camera on an Astrotrac, so that the stars are pinpoints rather than trails in deep twilight horizon shots. Aiming the frames of the pano is trickier in this case, as the camera sits above a tilted platform whose alignment towards the celestial pole must be preserved.

    Another unusual thing I've done is a handheld infrared stitch. For fast handheld shutter speeds in the IR, you need a DB whose IR-cut filter can be trivially removed (Kodak DCS, Mamiya ZD), or which has no IR-cut filter at all (a few custom Phase One & Leaf "full spectrum colour" and "Achromatic" variants). I use a Kodak DCS645M.

    I use Hugin to stitch - really excellent free software. It does amazingly accurate automatic lens profiling; I haven't seen any of the sort of residual vignetting that jagsiva drew attention to above.

    Late 2012 Mac Mini: 2.6 GHz quad-core i7, 16GB 1600MHz RAM, 1.12TB Fusion Drive [1TB HDD with 128GB SSD]

  30. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I do pano with this baby. No stitching needed

    Likes 3 Member(s) liked this post

  31. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    565
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    +1

    Hard to beat that Linhof - gets you (virtually) to that sweet spot of panoramic photography, namely the 3:1 ratio. I see a lot of stitched images from tech cameras that linger around the 2:1 ratio - just not the same.

  32. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    It is a pain to use but yes the results are worth it! Sorry for straying off topic. I find it hard to stitch panos on a tech cam because I often shoot in interesting weather conditions (fog, twilight, etc.) Hard to compensate for exposure and fall off even with LCC. (If you a long lens it's different i guess). So I went back to film for panos

  33. #33
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    90
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    21

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Me too I shoot Hasseblad XPan and hope to see a digital sensor for it like the DMR.

  34. #34
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Would be nice to have a single shot sensor.

  35. #35
    Member wryphotography's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    66
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by STCameras View Post
    Would be nice to have a single shot sensor.
    could you imagine 3 60mp sensors together? the file sizes would be absurd. One IQ180 file is already half the size of one 3200ppi scan at 16bit of a 617 transparency.

    I'm selling my Fuji cause the workflow is too much of a pita to scan in and then clean off dust, edit etc. I would rather stitch 3x1 panos, and have the option to do take single frames for 4x5 ratio or other things.

    I stitch with Mamiya AFD and iq180 without a tech cam or really doing too much nodal point calculations and the results are superb.

  36. #36
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    11
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Agreed........

    However the idea of stitching is a workaround becasue we all want to make these wonderful large format images. It's achievable in several ways with the gear we have so we do it.

  37. #37
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    171
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    3

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I miss the one shot pure magic captures of my Fuji GX617 with Velvia 50. Waves were much easier to capture. I do like the results of the IQ180 though. The digital file is just too nice to pass up if you can afford one. Someday there will be a great 1x3 digital sensor.

  38. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by wryphotography View Post
    could you imagine 3 60mp sensors together? the file sizes would be absurd. One IQ180 file is already half the size of one 3200ppi scan at 16bit of a 617 transparency.

    I'm selling my Fuji cause the workflow is too much of a pita to scan in and then clean off dust, edit etc. I would rather stitch 3x1 panos, and have the option to do take single frames for 4x5 ratio or other things.

    I stitch with Mamiya AFD and iq180 without a tech cam or really doing too much nodal point calculations and the results are superb.
    I certainly can imagine a 3x 60mp sensor and that would be a beautiful thing! By then our computers can handle files like that with no sweat

  39. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Dallas/Novosibirsk
    Posts
    632
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by mmbma View Post
    I certainly can imagine a 3x 60mp sensor and that would be a beautiful thing! By then our computers can handle files like that with no sweat
    Its only 180mp. Less than your average scan from 4x5 film. Computers right now can handle it pretty easy (i regularly work with 400mp scans).

  40. #40
    Senior Member alajuela's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Shanghai / Miami
    Posts
    552
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    124

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Quote Originally Posted by SergeiR View Post
    Its only 180mp. Less than your average scan from 4x5 film. Computers right now can handle it pretty easy (i regularly work with 400mp scans).
    Hi
    When you have an 60 meg raw file you have about 300+ megabyte 16 bit tif file. So three raw files in a pano opened in PS is close to one giga byte on one layer.

  41. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    Yes. Actual file of a 180mp sensor will be much larger in 16 bit. A drum scan of my 6x17 film usually yield a 1.3gig file alone at 4000 dpi i think (could be wrong about the resolution)

    a few manupilations in photoshop on a file that size will easily get out of hand

  42. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    450
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Anyone Stitching Panos with a MF Digital Back?

    I stitch with my H4D-40 but with mixed results, mainly due to operator error haha. I find if you plan to do panos, esp early in the morning, make sure you have enough coffee in you cause there's a decent amount involved.

    Gear: Hassy H4D-40, 35-90mm, RRS TVC-33, BH-55, RRS pano clamp, RRS nodal slide
    Software: phocus, lightroom, photoshop, etc

    In my experience....I'm just repeating what a lot of others have said, but if you decide to stitch with this method nodal slide method, for optimum results, make sure you: 1) level everything; 2) shoot manual exposure; 3) when in manual, expose for the highlights BEFORE starting the pano (MFD is very forgiving but you can have unrecoverable highlights as I have found out); 4) avoid using wide angles - vignetting and distortion can do weird things; 5) avoid shooting moving subjects (waves, fog, etc...sometimes long exposure water is fine); 6) make sure you get around 1/3 overlap. I need to print out these steps and stick them on my pano clamp cause I always forget something in the field haha. You are also going to want to know your nodal slide points for each focal length you carry before you get out in the field if you plan to have a busy foreground.

    Leveling and planning your composition seem to be the most important steps for me with this method. If you end up having to crop from your pano you lose lots of resolution and kinda defeat the purpose of doing a pano.

    I find it's not always necessary to find the nodal point unless you have a distinct foreground. Most of the panos I do are things in the distance and I find parallax errors aren't a huge deal as you increase subject to camera distance.

    I also ALWAYS take a wide angle shot BEFORE starting the pano in case I screw up the pano. That way I have at least get the shot I want and have one file I can do a 6x17 crop on.

    I attached two panos I did last week in San Fran with the above method. Both are 2-stitch panos at 39MP and 65MP respectively, demonstrating the important of planning your shot and leveling if you don't wanna lose resolution.
    Likes 2 Member(s) liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •