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Thread: Printing Medium format images

  1. #51
    Super Duper
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    If Guy could shove that thing on a pallet, I'd strongly be considering it too. Alternatively, if he's willing to make the drive east to deliver, the least I could do is have a burger and fries with a cold one ready when he arrives....LOL!

    Dave (D&A)

  2. #52
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    Im coming to NY i think July 20th but a truck is bringing all our stiff for the show. I can put it on the truck. No problem
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  3. #53
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul2660 View Post
    From my experience, the Epson's prefer daily use even the newer models. I leave mine one all the time except when a thunderstorm is expected. If I don't have a series of prints scheduled, I will run a pattern that I picked up from Wayne Fox, who posts on this forum quite a bit. He has a multicolored test print that exercises all the nozzles.

    The Canon line up handle clogs differently in that they map out the clog and allow the user to replace the head.

    Also +1 on the Charles Cramer class, he had stopped doing them for a while, I am glad to see he is back with a schedule. However Jeff Shewe has put a lot of time into the Digital Print, and to his credit it's written in a very user friendly format, a ton a great help in that book.

    Paul
    Paul, I don't recall Charlie had stopped his class since I know him since last 12 yr. or so. He was teaching with Bill Atkinson before. Bill dosen't teach anymore, Charlie is doing with Rex Naden since then.

    I think Charlie's class and Jeff Schewe's book are two different thing. Both can help. Since you mentioned, I will read Jeff Schewe's book for technical interest, and thanks for sharing it.

    Probably you have taken Charlie's class as well. What I like from Charlie's class is how to artistically interpret an image. How to treat color, tone and density. How to desaturate was most important lesson I have learned probably. How human brain interprets an image in short term and long term and the role of color saturation. Now I need to rework on many of my images :-).

    Nothing compares with when Charlie looks over your shoulder and provides his critiques and suggestions. He doesn't allow to make large print, unless he makes sure everything is right and you need to graduate from each size before moving to next size print of the same image.

    Another important thing is, he gives his own images as exercise to work on an shows techniques he had applied to make those museum quality prints. You start working on your images during mid-way of the class. Wish his class could have been for longer duration (beyond 3 full days).

    I have seen very few passionate photography instructors like Charlie, Michael Frye and Keith Walklet.

    Subrata
    Last edited by subrata1965; 15th May 2014 at 23:10.

  4. #54
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    Subrata

    You are right I was thinking about Bill Atkinson.

    Paul

  5. #55
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    I have a bit of a different opinion. I do all of my own printing on a large Epson, and I also do a lot of finishing post processing with Capture One, Lightroom and Photoshhop. But there is little if anything I do differently for print versus web. My post processing is to create the best image I'm capable of producing. I think most people simply glance at images online but really look at a physical print, so we tend to be more critical and discerning of prints, but the same weaknesses are there in an online version too... we just don't notice.

    In short, I don't see printing as hard. What's hard is creating the ideal finished image. Actually printing the image is pretty straight forward and mechanical, but we tend to be more critical of the result when we really see our image.

    The only real differences in my workflow are color space (ProPhoto RGB for print and sRGB for online) and final sharpening.

  6. #56
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    Hope this does not sound too much like a sell, but my company has been offering larger format custom printing for photographers for over 15 years.
    We have (3) 60" Canon IPF 12 color Pigmented Ink printers, and are one of the very few Hahnemühle Certified print shops in the USA. We always include test prints with every order, so its truly a collaboration between artist and printer. Bullivant Gallery

  7. #57
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    This is a good point, and it is indeed the case for many different images. That said, this is part of the job description...at least for my work. Being a good printer is not just making sure the image on the screen matches the final print, although that is a very important skill. Most clients have an idealized image in their head, and it is the printer's job to work with them to draw that out. So the file preparation is indeed the bulk of the work for most clients.

    A lot of the artists I work with often have a very good idea of what they want, but they don't have the technical skills to get their files there. Or if they do, they often do it in destructive ways. Many times people will come in with other prints or artworks and want you to match it. Getting the images right before printing is much of the job. I have some clients who bring me a fully prepared file that just needs to be adjusted for the paper and printer quirks, but roughly 75% of my clients wind up having me do more substantive processing on the files...not just people who are not technically inclined either...

    As for the printing itself, there are some technical challenges, but the most important skills are visual and interpersonal: developing an eye for what can improve images, knowing when and how to deal with clients -- for example, when to try to suggest fixes for problems you see and when to just hold your tongue, and steering people towards papers and formats that best suit their intentions and aesthetic.



    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Stocks View Post
    I have a bit of a different opinion. I do all of my own printing on a large Epson, and I also do a lot of finishing post processing with Capture One, Lightroom and Photoshhop. But there is little if anything I do differently for print versus web. My post processing is to create the best image I'm capable of producing. I think most people simply glance at images online but really look at a physical print, so we tend to be more critical and discerning of prints, but the same weaknesses are there in an online version too... we just don't notice.

    In short, I don't see printing as hard. What's hard is creating the ideal finished image. Actually printing the image is pretty straight forward and mechanical, but we tend to be more critical of the result when we really see our image.

    The only real differences in my workflow are color space (ProPhoto RGB for print and sRGB for online) and final sharpening.
    My photos are here: http://www.stuartrichardson.com and more recent work here: http://stuartrichardson.tumblr.com/ Please have a look at my book!
    My lab is here: http://www.customphotolab.is and on facebook

  8. #58
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    Being a good printer is not just making sure the image on the screen matches the final print, although that is a very important skill. Most clients have an idealized image in their head, and it is the printer's job to work with them to draw that out. So the file preparation is indeed the bulk of the work for most clients.

    A lot of the artists I work with often have a very good idea of what they want, but they don't have the technical skills to get their files there.
    That's an excellent point. My personal background is in photography, degree, ran a commercial ad studio for 15 years, and then transitioned into the printing business, mostly from the demand of others wanting a "visual partnership" that photo labs don't offer (in fact most don't want to talk to you at all…just upload your images and we'll let the computer spit out your print).

    The advantage of a collaboration with a great printer is multi fold; first, they can objectively look at your image from a technical and artistic point of view. Second, they have the experience of printing for many different artist and different types of work on a variety of medias, and are hopefully experts at color managed workflow. Also, they will have larger printers (typically) and stock a variety of medias so you can quickly test ideas.

    There are many advantages, and I think the most challenging part is for the artist/photographer to realize they are NOT giving up any control over the final print they are actually adding a HUGE amount of control to it by having such a creative partner to work with.


    _______________________________________
    Fine Art Printing for Photographers: www.BullivantGallery.com
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  9. #59
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    Re: Printing Medium format images

    I completely agree...the control point is very good as well. I take as much control as the client wants -- for some they just give me the raw files and have me do everything else, but most have a clear idea of what they want, but are often not completely aware of all the possibilities.

    For example, I recently did a job for a gallery here where the work consisted of pairing star trail images with portraits of a dying man. The portraits were just of the head, floating moonlike in a black space. The client had initially wanted a standard Hahnemühle matte paper, but to me the silveriness and slight shine of Photo Rag Satin seemed like a better choice. It is a bit of an oddball paper, but it fit extremely well for this work. I did a small test for him, and he agreed that it was a much better fit than either a standard matte paper or a luster/gloss paper. The client knew what they wanted, and would have been happy with a fine art matte paper, but once they saw a new option, they were even happier.

    I certainly do not want to persuade anyone against printing for themselves, as I think that is great thing to do. Many people, however, are simply not of that mindset. Even for those that are, working with a good printer is like having a non-judgmental advisor. They give you another set of eyes and can confront you with options you might not have considered. If you then decide not to go that route, that's fine, but it can be very helpful.

    When I was learning darkroom printing at ICP, I studied with Brian Young, who is their master printer. I remember presenting him with a "finished" print. He said it was good, but suggested a few different tweaks -- a slightly different exposure, a bit more burning at a different grade etc. I went back into the darkroom and did it again, and wow...it was much better. I had thought I was done, but the advice was spot on. I try to emulate that approach in my work. It may take a few more decades, but one day I will get there!
    My photos are here: http://www.stuartrichardson.com and more recent work here: http://stuartrichardson.tumblr.com/ Please have a look at my book!
    My lab is here: http://www.customphotolab.is and on facebook

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