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Thread: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

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    What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    Hi, everyone,

    I've read the press release, but still don't know what is actually different about the AF 45/2.8 D compared to the AF 45/2.8.

    I'm not looking for subjective differences (I read the thread where this information was given).

    I'm aware that both lenses are 9 elements/7 groups, minimum focusing distance is exactly the same, and the weight is within 3 grams (495 vs. 492g); I know MTF's are too much to ask for, but I'm suspicious that the optical formula has been recycled. I'm looking for objective differences -- what exactly earns it the "D" moniker? What makes it worth $2100?

    Thanks to anyone with this information.

    Best regards,
    -Brad

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    Senior Member yaya's Avatar
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    Re: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    The D has an AF clutch on the barrel like the new 80, 55-110 etc. and feels a bit more solid than the old one. The glass is the same formula but is likely to go through tighter selection process on the manufacturing line.

    Yair
    Yair Shahar | Product Manager | Phase One | Mamiya Leaf
    e: [email protected] | m: +44(0)77 8992 8199 | yaya's blog

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    Re: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    Thanks, Yair. It sounds like nothing noticeable will be different in my prints will result from the upgrade.

    I've got the same question for the 80/2.8 and 80/2.8 D. I know the barrel has been upgraded from plastic to aluminum, and there is the new clutch mechanism, and that the 80 D is one of the stronger performers in the Mamiya lineup, but have the optics been improved at all from the old version?

    (And if so, what has changed? The elements/groups, at least, are again, identical).

    Thanks in advance,
    Brad

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    Senior Member yaya's Avatar
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    Re: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    Quote Originally Posted by BradleyGibson View Post
    Thanks, Yair. It sounds like nothing noticeable will be different in my prints will result from the upgrade.

    I've got the same question for the 80/2.8 and 80/2.8 D. I know the barrel has been upgraded from plastic to aluminum, and there is the new clutch mechanism, and that the 80 D is one of the stronger performers in the Mamiya lineup, but have the optics been improved at all from the old version?

    (And if so, what has changed? The elements/groups, at least, are again, identical).

    Thanks in advance,
    Brad
    Brad,

    Testing the two 80's side by side with an Aptus 75S and standard resolution charts I could not tell any difference between them. This was my old beaten 80mm and a brand new D one.

    Saying that, the new 80 does feel more robust and the AF clutch is convenient.

    Yair
    Yair Shahar | Product Manager | Phase One | Mamiya Leaf
    e: [email protected] | m: +44(0)77 8992 8199 | yaya's blog

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    Subscriber Member tashley's Avatar
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    Re: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    I purchased a 150mm F3.5 for almost nothing a few weeks ago and it's great... I saw a comparison somewhere that seemed to indicate that it was as good as its replacement and since I use this length infrequently I thought I'd give it a go. Very pleased.

    t

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    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    Quote Originally Posted by yaya View Post
    Brad,

    Testing the two 80's side by side with an Aptus 75S and standard resolution charts I could not tell any difference between them. This was my old beaten 80mm and a brand new D one.

    Saying that, the new 80 does feel more robust and the AF clutch is convenient.

    Yair
    I never did a side by side of the two but I love the D one much better than the old one that AF clutch to me is essential and any lens Mamiya has that I want. I do not like going to the body to switch off the AF , being on the lens to me is the way to go in almost all cases. Go AF than switch to manual to hold it or fine tune it. Yes you can hold with a rear button also but i still am a old throwback to manual focusing. I think it is the better lens but I can't prove it optically. Certainly the 80D took all the P65 it could give it from our testing.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

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    Re: What's actually new in the Mamiya 45/2.8 D?

    Quote Originally Posted by tashley View Post
    I purchased a 150mm F3.5 for almost nothing a few weeks ago and it's great... I saw a comparison somewhere that seemed to indicate that it was as good as its replacement and since I use this length infrequently I thought I'd give it a go. Very pleased.

    t
    In our experience, while the 45mm D is not a big improvement over the older 45mm, the new 150mm f/2.8 is a large step up from the 150mm f/3.5.

    Focus speed and accuracy, performance wide open, the AF/MF clutch, and the improved build quality really make that 150mm f/2.8 a sweet sweet lens. It's easily the most improved lens in the line. Then again no one is saying the f/3.5 is a slouch. All things are relative.

    My philosophy has always been (stated here frequently) that the older lenses (whether last generation AF, or the older MF) are perfect to "fill out" your lens lineup, while your workhorses should *generally* be the latest glass. Since T Ashley doesn't use the 150mm length often it would make sense to pick up the older f/3.5 version.

    The ability to shoot a 150mm lens at f/2.8 on a full frame MF system and use the 1/4000th shutter speed in broad daylite to isolate a person, plant, architectural feature etc is really great. The fact that the lens performs incredibly well even wide open at f/2.8 is a big bonus.

    Doug Peterson, Head of Technical Services
    Capture Integration, Phase One & Canon Dealer | Personal Portfolio

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