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Thread: Movements on a budget

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    Movements on a budget

    Dear folks,

    I have a query and hope someone can answer them.

    For a while, I have been thinking of putting together a view camera system for my Credo 40 back. The idea is to buy bits and pieces whenever I find them at decent prices to slowly build the system.

    Now I don't have much experience with large format, but I am guesstimating that a 4x5/ 6x9 view camera would serve as the base. But I am not sure where to start with this (Of course, it should be a view camera that supports a Mamiya 645 back mount), but I do see quite a few on ebay for 3 digit prices. Are there any specific models that are recommended? Is it possible to mount a sliding back on any view camera?

    As for the lenses, I basically only need a wide (For anything longer, I prefer to use the Mamiya body). A Schneider 35 or 43 would be my preference. My understanding is that these should be bought mounted in the specific lensboards of the camera manufacturer, right? Or is it possible to re-mount them in another type of lensboard?


    Sorry for the noob questions, but any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    The first thing you will need to find out is the minimum distance between the from and back standards. Wides for your back are for focal lengths that are really not usual for 4x5 or 6x7. Some camera systems can have recessed lens boards to help with that.

    If you want movements with such short focal length, you may also need models that have bag bellows. Regular bellows will bind.

    The universal back mount for a 4x5 view camera is the grafloc back. There have been sliding backs made for those cameras. Whether there is a sliding back that will accept your Mamiya back is the next question.

    My question would be since you don't have any experience with view cameras, why do you want one? Your limited budget is going to be real handicap.
    Will

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    There are a number of ways of going about this if you want to use a view camera as a base. I've done it before with my Toyo AII field camera and with the Toyo sliding back / GG with Mamiya mount. Now admittedly the sliding back adapter wasn't cheap (or small or light) but it did the job. The biggest problem you'll find is with the sliding back adapter it's a severe crop on the 4x5 camera (small GG to work with) and also getting an accurate registration between what you focus on with the GG and what the adapter is adjusted to with the MFDB. Also, the GG is typically the same size as the sensor and it isn't that easy to use to focus and dial in movements in my experience. I find that I much prefer just to shoot film with my 4x5 to be honest - REALLY full frame and a contemplative experience.

    Another approach is to look at one of the stitching adapters out there. I know that people like the Kapture Group used to have these - basically a simple back adapter that fits in a Graflock fitting and you replace the GG with the back to shoot. Some even were offset so that you could rotate the adapter in the frame to do a 4 image stitch (one shot per corner). However, these are as expensive new as a Cambo Actus DB ... which I heartedly recommend as a far better way of approaching this - even shooting tethered and using film lenses until you feel the desire for the best Schneider/Rodenstocks. I'd check eBay as there are often perfectly good back adapters from China there - if you want high precision then you're chasing it in the wrong way IMHO.

    I can understand the desire from a low cost fun/process point of view but it's a LOT of work using view cameras this way vs a technical camera with movements or something like the Actus DB (or Arca equivalent etc).
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    If you are just looking for rise/fall, I remember a company called Fotoman out of China made a "low-cost" tech camera in the Alpa/Arca Swiss vein. I am not sure if it is in production, but another idea.
    Will

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    I've been looking at putting together a 4x5/6x12/6x9 kit as well (for film, since I don't have an MF DB) and I can tell you that a lot of the 3-digit priced folding field cameras, like the Wista SP for example, have minimum extension lengths that preclude anything wider than a 90mm. The latest Toyos (45 AII, AX, and CF) will work with a 45 Grandagon (6x9 or 6x12) or the old Schneider SA 47XL (4x5 with some vignetting) on recessed boards. The Digitar 43 probably won't work and the 35 certainly won't work.

    Ebony makes some fantastic field cameras specifically for wides, like their 2x3 cameras or their SW45, and they use standard lens boards for everything but the 35's, but the cheapest I've seen any of them used was $1800.
    Last edited by freaklikeme; 6th September 2015 at 15:10. Reason: typo
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by Shashin View Post
    If you are just looking for rise/fall, I remember a company called Fotoman out of China made a "low-cost" tech camera in the Alpa/Arca Swiss vein. I am not sure if it is in production, but another idea.
    They're still around and very active on eBay, but like the Alpa/Arca/Horseman cameras, you end up investing heavily in their cones, focusing helicoids, and other various accessories for your specific lenses. So in the long run, even something like a new Ebony SW45 that uses standard Wista/Linhof 110 boards is about as expensive. Plus you get the option of shooting 4x5 film if you have that desire.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    It's not clear what sort of budget you have in mind, but assuming you mean the type of budget that has you buying bits and pieces and cobbling together over time something that will work (as your initial post suggests) rather than buying a complete 6x9 / 2x3 view camera setup, then the answer is clearly Toyo, which made cameras in many formats over the years and all of which are quite modular, which makes swapping parts around between them fairly easy.

    In fact, I have done exactly what you propose, combining parts from a Toyo 45G and 23G, plus various accessories (and as shown in these photos, with 810G standard platforms, which are considerably larger than the 45G and 23G platforms, but also provide more stability), to come up with a Frankencamera that was assembled specifically for the purpose of using wide-angle lenses. Behold:



    As you can see in the photos below, when moved all the way to its rearmost position, the recessed lensboard on the front standard will actually next inside the rear standard and with many lenses, this will cause the rear element to very close to, if not into contact with, the groundglass. I am not aware of any other commercially made view camera that has this capability:





    FYI, there is actually another lensboard adapter combo that will nest even further inside the rear standard, but it leaves very little room to operate the shutter and adjust the lens aperture, so I didn't use it unless I absolutely had no choice.

    Note that with the bag bellows attached, the two standards can't be moved quite this closely together, because a small amount of room -- maybe 8-10 mm -- must be allowed for the two thicknesses of bellows material to slide over themselves as movements are applied.

    Note also that while every part I used (including several not shown here, which are used to configure the camera differently for other applications) was made by Toyo, some of them will need to be modified in minor ways. But what needs doing will be obvious and easy for any home hobbyist to either do themselves or arrange to have done by a machinist.

    The only tricky issue is with the sliding back adapter, because it can only be mounted vertically, as the uprights of the rear standard will interfere with its movement side-to-side. I used a no-name Chinese-made one sourced via eBay, but once I exchanged the crappy groundglass with a spare Toyo one I had (which had to be trimmed and shimmed to fit and align properly) it worked very well. Alas, this was often not as well as I wanted or needed, because it was very difficult to zero the movements for shots where they weren't needed, so I was almost always applying a small amount of tilt or swing and while this wasn't visible when the camera was used with film, it did become visible at times when used with even a modest digital back (which in my case was a Phase One P30+ and definitely a sub-optimal choice because its design restricted the amount of movements that could be used with typical view camera lenses before vignetting occurred.)

    Unfortunately, trying to follow in my footsteps will be difficult, because Toyo 23G cameras were not made in very large numbers (I understand the production total was just over 100 copies and that was nearly 30 years ago, so good luck finding one today) and the same is also true for some of the accessories I used (for example, the bag bellows that works with a 45G standard on one side and a 23G standard on the other side.) That said, you can also accomplish much the same end result using a pair of 45G standards and this will make it easier to find a bag bellows as well, but the camera will be bulkier and heavier, too, so ultimately less useful for field work, if that's your thing. Alternatively, you might get lucky and find a Toyo VX 23D being sold inexpensively -- I saw one sell for ~$1,400 on eBay a few years ago, but passed on it because I didn't have any significant use for it at the time -- or perhaps another brand/model of 6x9/2x3 view camera that were available for a short time a decade or so ago.

    As the dust on the camera suggests, I haven't used this setup in many years and the only reason I've held onto it was because I don't know what the future might bring and trying to duplicate it would be very difficult, if not impossible, as I noted above. I no longer have the sliding back adapter because I let a friend borrow it and he's since moved away and we've lost touch, so I no idea where it is now. But I don't expect replacing it will prove to be an insurmountable obstacle.

    That said, though, I may be persuaded to part with it, so if you're interested, send me a PM and we can discuss it.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Synn, maybe an economical way to be up and running at once....

    http://www.photografica.com/product/...adapter_61459/

    Note! I have nothing to do with either shop or cam, I just saw the ad browsing.
    Alpa FPS MAX TC | Alpagon 32Hr | Helvetar 75 | Schneider 120N | Leaf Aptus II 5 Leaf Credo 60 | www.danlindberg.com
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Hello all,

    Thank you very much for all the responses so far and also the individual suggestions. They are very enlightning and have given me a lot to think over on a monday morning.

    Basically, I want to do this as a hobby project to get some experience with movements (Tilt AND Shift, which rules out some shift only options mentioned ), which will help me achieve some creative ideas I have in mind. One thing I want to avoid is to get into a system that uses its own helical focus system etc. The costs of the lenses rise astronomically with these and not worth is for an amateur hobbyist such as myself. This rules out all the tech camera platforms.

    The Cambo Actus DB mentioned above seems like an interesting option to me. I did some research on it and it seems like perfect for the scenarios I envision. The only issue is that I can't seem to find a sliding back for it on the Cambo website. Taking the back repeatedly off in the field isn't something I feel comfortable doing. Maybe Ebay/ Kapture group will prove helpful.

    Thanks again!

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    As far as I know the Cambo Actus is not designed to use a sliding back (not rigid enough?), it's intended for live-view capable backs.

    On a budget, I'd look second hand. The ideal I think would be something like an Arca-Swiss MF-two, decent price and has the rigidity etc, but they are very rare. My own camera type Linhof Techno is also a very good all-around solution, but it's pretty expensive even second hand.

    Buying new Silvestri has some budget alternatives, Paula at Linhof Studio can give good advice on that.

    Using a 4x5" you'd want geared movements due to the shorter focal lengths you will be using, and then Sinar X can be an alternative. I've played around a little with that, and it works in the field but it's definitely not very practical and pretty large and heavy.

    The hardest part is if you want to shoot wide angle and focus at infinity, then the problem with parallelism etc get very real. For "product" type of photography with longer focal lengths and closer focus distances movements are coarser and then a second hand 4x5 will do fine.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    it is possible with the actus to swap out the dback with a ground glass. for example, mine is hasselblad V mount, and Hassey makes a ground glass V mount "back", was intended for use with the SWC, a V that was not a reflex
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by synn View Post
    The Cambo Actus DB mentioned above seems like an interesting option to me. I did some research on it and it seems like perfect for the scenarios I envision. The only issue is that I can't seem to find a sliding back for it on the Cambo website. Taking the back repeatedly off in the field isn't something I feel comfortable doing. Maybe Ebay/ Kapture group will prove helpful.

    Thanks again!
    Since you have the Credo 40 you can set up tethering in the field to a small laptop if you are concerned about removing the MFDB.

    As john mentioned, there are ground glass options for the Actus DB including a native fit Cambo that would allow you to leave the back on a Cambo plate/cover, and then swap out the ground glass via two clips. There's also a magnifier for it.

    Sliding back adapters are all well and good in theory but you have to consider the size and inconvenience for travel/use. I've seen and used the various Linhof siding backs, Toyo, as well as shot alongside users of the native Cambo WRS sliding back. They work well but you have to live with a wide wind sail of an assembly. certainly once you are set up and want to do iterative compose, tweak, shoot of a scene then they are "safer" than swapping out the back and disconnecting the sync cable. However, with the appropriate care and rigorous workflow it's safe enough - personally I'd use a laptop in the field with live tethering in Capture One over the ground glass or sliding adapter though. Since it's all going to be inconvenient, at least live tethering will be bang on accurate.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Cobbling together a system "for movements" can easily put you on dangerous grounds here in Dante's forum. You start out slow, budget-minded, and innocent enough---and before you know it, you have a full blown Range Rover loaded with gear. (couldn't help myself, Graham).

    If you really really really know what you want to do (or enjoy)----it really is quite possible to build a kick-*** system without breaking the bank (relative terms here in Dante's Forum, meaning a very reasonable modest budget expenditure otherwise equivalent to, "Are you #*?#*** crazy" to the rest of the "normal" photographic community). That being said, I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss a technical camera.

    You already have the larger expenditure which is the MFDB. A simple Cambo WRS 1200 and a single lens with a t/s panel may be all that is required to satisfy your need for movements. I could easily get by with only my HR40 t/s on a Cambo----I enjoy it that much. I call it a "one-lens wonder." A Schneider 35 paired with your Credo 40 would be less yet. Cambo Actus is probably a great choice with a CMOS live-view back, though you could pair your USB3 enabled MFDB tethering with a Surface Pro. If you can go in and keep it simple, it really is possible to put together a small "higher end" kit that in the scheme of things is just simply easier and more enjoyable to use.

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    I agree with Ken regarding the one lens wonder outfit. The 40HR is sweet on a full frame back and the Cambo WRS is great bang for the buck. It does add up quick if you add in the T/S panel though and the 40HR isn't inexpensive (and that's coming from an Alpa guy ... ). With the Credo 40 I'd agree that the Schneider 35 XL is a great option although you need the centre filter.

    There are some great used options with these cameras from time to time here (There's a killer Arca deal in b/s at the moment).

    I can highly recommend the Range Rover
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    ...and here I was considering a modified 4x4 Mercedes Benz Sprinter. Way too much room to fill up with more and more gear. I'm sticking with an SUV for now, and I'll definitely consider the Range Rover. Thanks, Graham.


    I think this is the Arca in the buy/sell that Graham is talking about: http://www.getdpi.com/forum/gear-fs-...rotamount.html

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    That's a great budget idea, Ken, and would be fantastic for someone just starting out with MFDB on a tech camera, given the number of relatively inexpensive backs that lack live view but can be tethered and the number of low-cost Surface Pros on the used market. Even getting a tripod attachment to hold the Surface is affordable. The only real downside would be the lack of a replaceable battery on the Pro, so you'd have to pack some sort of alternate power source in the field. Personally, I'm holding out for and MFDB with a 6x7 sensor or a shock-less focal plane shutter.

    Synn, one suggestion to help with the budget. The Digitar 35's a great lens, but I would strongly consider the APO-Sironar Digital 35. It typically sells for 25-50% less than the Digitar (the last auction I tracked for the Sironar ended at just over a grand), has a larger image circle, and, thanks to an exit pupil that's a few mm's farther away from the sensor and larger rear element, should have more usable IC for shifting. I don't know if you'll need a center filter (it's probably a good idea) but that's typically cheaper used as well. It's center resolution doesn't match the Digitar's, but it's no slouch.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by synn View Post
    Hello all,

    Thank you very much for all the responses so far and also the individual suggestions. They are very enlightning and have given me a lot to think over on a monday morning.

    Basically, I want to do this as a hobby project to get some experience with movements (Tilt AND Shift, which rules out some shift only options mentioned ), which will help me achieve some creative ideas I have in mind. One thing I want to avoid is to get into a system that uses its own helical focus system etc. The costs of the lenses rise astronomically with these and not worth is for an amateur hobbyist such as myself. This rules out all the tech camera platforms.

    The Cambo Actus DB mentioned above seems like an interesting option to me. I did some research on it and it seems like perfect for the scenarios I envision. The only issue is that I can't seem to find a sliding back for it on the Cambo website. Taking the back repeatedly off in the field isn't something I feel comfortable doing. Maybe Ebay/ Kapture group will prove helpful.

    Thanks again!
    Hi Synn:

    I own a Arca RM3Di tech cam and even though I have the groundglass I never use it. I estimate my composition using the optical finder, take a shot and adjust as necessary. Most tech cams have a focusing helicoid either on the lens or on the body (Arca) with a distance scale. Accurate focusing with wide angles is pretty easy thanks to the large depth of field. With telephoto lenses it is a bit more of a pain.

    I highly recommend a tech cam since small digital formats (vs 4x5 or 8x10 film) are quite sensitive to precise lens/back alignment and the lens will be quite close to the sensor, specially with wide angles.

    I am sure you can get a Cambo (or Arca) used at a good price with a really nice lens like the 35mm schneider digitar. It is an awesome setup. After using tech cam lenses you will see how good a lens can get and suddenly wide angle SLR lenses start looking like crap, even good ones.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_R View Post
    I am sure you can get a Cambo (or Arca) used at a good price with a really nice lens like the 35mm schneider digitar. It is an awesome setup. After using tech cam lenses you will see how good a lens can get and suddenly wide angle SLR lenses start looking like crap, even good ones.
    And then the money pit opens up ...

    In all seriousness, Ken is correct. Most (but not all) DSLR wide angle lenses will seem like bringing a knife to a gun fight afterwards.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    As Oscar Wilde said, "my tastes are simple, I only like the best"
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Thank you all again for your recommendations. Well, the good news is that I already have a Surface Pro 3 (Bought it the moment they released it). I can handle the live view on the Credo 40 in small amounts and adding a few batteries and a tethertools (or something) holder for the SP3 to the kit does seem like a decent alternative to a sliding back.

    I have read Ken (Doo)'s report on tethering with the SP3 quite a few times, so I have a decent understanding on how this will perform in the field. I was also looking at the Alpa viewfinder app to help frame compositions in the field.

    At the moment, I am still leaning towards the Actus rather than a tech platform, simply because the lenses are so much cheaper and I can get tilt with all of them. The price differential between an Actus and a WRS isnt much, but the lenses are another story.

    Lots to ponder over, but I am not complaining!

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by synn View Post
    Thank you all again for your recommendations. Well, the good news is that I already have a Surface Pro 3 (Bought it the moment they released it). I can handle the live view on the Credo 40 in small amounts and adding a few batteries and a tethertools (or something) holder for the SP3 to the kit does seem like a decent alternative to a sliding back.

    I have read Ken (Doo)'s report on tethering with the SP3 quite a few times, so I have a decent understanding on how this will perform in the field. I was also looking at the Alpa viewfinder app to help frame compositions in the field.

    At the moment, I am still leaning towards the Actus rather than a tech platform, simply because the lenses are so much cheaper and I can get tilt with all of them. The price differential between an Actus and a WRS isnt much, but the lenses are another story.

    Lots to ponder over, but I am not complaining!
    HERE is a good overview of the Cambo Actus.

    The big downside is the focusing. It does not have a distance scale based helicoid system. It is just rack focusing. Infinity should be pretty easy to find with any lens with some trial and error (using a distant object as subject, 2km away at least) but then you will have to make your own custom table for other distances.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    If you are tethering with a laptop, it's hard to beat options from Tethertools or Ninevolt. But if you have a Surface Pro tablet and are tethering in the field, make sure to check out the latest clamping options, https://kendoophotography.wordpress....clamp-choices/

    Actually, life is short. I think you should get the Cambo Actus DB, trade in your Credo for an IQ150 for the CMOS live-view and be done with it. Well, except for the lenses.

    And a Range Rover.

    ken
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Forget budget. Go Master technika.
    Kind regards - Hulyss - hulyssbowman.com

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_R View Post
    HERE is a good overview of the Cambo Actus.

    The big downside is the focusing. It does not have a distance scale based helicoid system. It is just rack focusing. Infinity should be pretty easy to find with any lens with some trial and error (using a distant object as subject, 2km away at least) but then you will have to make your own custom table for other distances.
    I would propose with the Credo 40 that you actually shoot / focus using the live view features of Capture One, not just shoot / review tethered. You are correct that it's more involved than using a tech camera because there is no calibrated helicoid to measure off and set distance against.

    I use the Cambo Actus DB with my IQ150 and admittedly the built in live view is AWESOME, let correct that, it's REALLY FRICKIN' AWESOME. Ditto any of the other CMOS backs such as the Credo 50c or CFV50c. It's so easy to use the Actus with live view on the LCD that the lack of calibrated distance scales isn't an issue at all. With live view on the SP3 over USB3 it should arguably be better with the larger display - not sure if you can use the multiple focus zones with the Credo but for tilts that would be great.

    I find that I can focus the Actus DB with both tilts / swing near/far and also long lenses (eg. 150mm SK XL Digitar) very very easily and nail the focus. The LV on the LCD is softer than is displayed on a tethered laptop too.

    For example - IQ150 with Actus DB and SK 150mm dialed in using live view which wouldn't be that impressive unless you realize where it comes from (excuse the jpg compression artifacts making it crunchier than it really is):



    Last edited by GrahamWelland; 8th September 2015 at 14:26.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    @Ken: Thanks for the suggestions for clamping options. Will look through them in detail before deciding on an option.
    Regarding the IQ 150, I know that this is a pandora's box, but I'm a good ol' CCD Lover.

    @Graham: Beautiful capture and it is good to see that the lack of calibrated distance markings is not a problem with the Actus. Almost everything that I want to do with it would involve infinity focus and some tilt and/or swing, so it shouldn't be a deal breaker.

    Currently, my thoughts are about going with some Schneider film lenses and not Digitar because of cost reasons. I understand that these won't be the sharpest optics out there, but that's ok.

    I have recently acquired a Mamiya 50mm shift, which while isn't as sharp as the Schneiders, delivers a sort of rendering that is very pleasant to me.

  25. #25
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    realize that not only are there no calibrated focus marks using the actus, there are no focus stops whatsoever, meaning you could have the lens 1" or 1/2" from infinity, on either side. you need some sort of live view to get even close enough to focus to where you can take a shot and confirm post-shot with the tethering that you got it right.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by jlm View Post
    realize that not only are there no calibrated focus marks using the actus, there are no focus stops whatsoever, meaning you could have the lens 1" or 1/2" from infinity, on either side. you need some sort of live view to get even close enough to focus to where you can take a shot and confirm post-shot with the tethering that you got it right.
    As I understand, there is a "Brake" of sorts that one can use in the Actus, right? i.e., once I achieve infinity focus on a lens after confirming it, i can leave the brake there for good (Unless I change the lens of course).

  27. #27
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    more or less correct. there is a sliding bar you can lock down so the lens cannot hit your sensor, but it stops the main slide, not the gear driven track. to use the bar as a safety stop, you would first set the gear track to it's close focus limit, then set the safety bar, and do this for your shortest fl lens. not quite the same as an infinity stop, but would get you close for that lens. bear in mind you still need a bit of +/- geared track movement even after hitting the stop. i suppose you could figure out some sort of scale for where the rear standard has to be, but it won't be as accurate as you would finally need.

    also distinguish live view on a CMOS back, which is superior, to live view on a CCD back. wayne fox has had good results using live view on his CCD back, but once you see the CMOS version, you will be spoiled forever.
    '

    something else to look at is using the Actus with the Sony A7RII, which Scho has been successful with, though wide angles are bit limited. but you do get all the movements and an especially good live view with 40 mpx
    Last edited by jlm; 9th September 2015 at 10:47.
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Dear forum,

    Does anyone here know anything about Schneider 47 lenses marked just "Digitar"? No APO, no XL.
    Do they have image circles big enough to allow movements on 44x33 backs? I am primarily looking for a big image circle, absolute sharpness is secondary.

    Thanks !

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    Re: Movements on a budget

    I've only ever seen the APO-Digitar, which has around a 110mm IC (advertised) so you should get about 27mm vertical, 35mm horizontal. So far as I know, the 28 L was the only "digital age" Schneider lens to get just a "Digitar" label and not APO-Digitar. That said, my knowledge on Schneider lenses isn't deep, and there could be differences in their marketing material versus how the lenses were actually labeled.

    Just be careful that someone isn't trying to sell you an old SA 47/5.6 as a Digitar. They're easy to confuse.
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  30. #30
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Quote Originally Posted by synn View Post
    Dear forum,

    Does anyone here know anything about Schneider 47 lenses marked just "Digitar"? No APO, no XL.
    Do they have image circles big enough to allow movements on 44x33 backs? I am primarily looking for a big image circle, absolute sharpness is secondary.

    Thanks !

    There was a 47 Digitar L that was non APO and had 60mm image circle. This is probably what you're seeing. A bit tight on your Credo if you want to move it.

    (Thanks to my friend Paul Cousins @ Schneider Optics for the assist).


    Steve Hendrix
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    Re: Movements on a budget

    Thank you very much for your help, Steve. It has been invaluable!

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