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Thread: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

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    Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Before my WRS 1200/Rod. 40TS arrives (I've got a 380 back) I'm just trying to get all my ducks in a row so I can hit the ground running. For ~$1000 I can pick up a viewfinder, mask and Leica D2 and take my iPad along for the ride. For possibly the same amount (give or take) I can pick up a Surface Pro.. which is what I think a lot of people have been gravitating towards lately.

    What is everyone's 'preferred' method? If I never plan on shooting handheld, is anything lost from not having the viewfinder? Is it worth getting both?

    ..Does anyone shoot without either?

    Input greatly appreciated.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    To use live view to compose and focus with a CCD sensor, you'll need a neutral density filter. See this thread started by Wayne Fox for hints:

    http://www.getdpi.com/forum/medium-f...rca-iq180.html




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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I'm still old-school, using sliding back and ground glass, with a 20x jewelry loupe for focusing. It works fine for me, but it does put some requirements on eye sight, and wide angles in weak light are tough. With some training you can do well in most conditions, but it's not exactly user-friendly.

    I was shooting in -20C (-4F) this weekend, one need to hold one's breath while focusing to avoid getting breath on the loupe that fogs it (the ground glass is more resistant, I don't know why). The stiff oil in the gears and cold fingers were more problematic in those conditions though making it tougher to apply movements :-).

    Personally I don't like the idea of having an extra tablet on the side, one more thing to carry and setup, and one more electronic thing that can fail when weather is tough.

    To me a proper CMOS live view on a decent back screen is the only real replacement of the ground glass, but it depends on your shooting style and shooting conditions what works for you.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I would say it depends a lot of your shooting style and subjects. I mainly shoot landscapes and have found the viewfinder, though not perfect, fits my style nicely. It's not 100% precise, but after getting used to it I can often compose the image in one shot. I also have the ground glass solution, but haven't really used it yet.

    I bought the Leica D2 when I got my kit but never use it. When using the Rodie 40HR I mainly have it at or near infinity and some tilt depending on the scene. With the IQ backs focus mask is a godsend and the 100% zoom is really good.
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by colorspace View Post
    Before my WRS 1200/Rod. 40TS arrives (I've got a 380 back) I'm just trying to get all my ducks in a row so I can hit the ground running. For ~$1000 I can pick up a viewfinder, mask and Leica D2 and take my iPad along for the ride. For possibly the same amount (give or take) I can pick up a Surface Pro.. which is what I think a lot of people have been gravitating towards lately.

    What is everyone's 'preferred' method? If I never plan on shooting handheld, is anything lost from not having the viewfinder? Is it worth getting both?

    ..Does anyone shoot without either?

    Input greatly appreciated.

    I use a Linhof Multifocus Viewfinder handheld for composition seeking. After my camera is setup, then I compose and focus via Live View (CFV-50c). Before I had a Live View DB, I used the ground-glass which I was accustomed to for many years coming from a 4x5". I personally like to travel light and do not find an additional electronic device attractive, but when it comes to tech cameras, whatever works for you, works.

    Kind regards,
    Darr
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    for a while there was an interest in mounting your i-phone on the cambo, using it's camera as a viewfinder. I made a contraption that did it, as did others. works pretty well, though a bit rube goldberg. limitations are the max wide angle for the phone without an adapter is about 40mm and parallax if shooting close. and of course, it is not a focus aid, only a composition aid.

    i tried the cambo viewfinder, but didn't think it was worth it. you can just eyeball the view and get pretty close, then
    basically you take a shot and check what you got and adjust

    what i do now is use a phone app from Viewfinder pro that will use the phone camera (i use it handheld to figure out the best lens for the field of view i want, as the app will put in frame lines and zoom for your back, lens combinations.

    and i use a cmos back, same as Darr, so it has a very useful live view to check focus and composition.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I have a viewfinder for my Arca, also tried the various iPhone apps as well. I find that that just eyeballing the scene and then reviewing a couple of shots before taking the final works best. It is rare that the first shot is my keeper as I have to confirm focus anyway. Also, if I'm stitching, then I find that review on the back is the best way to go.

    So now I rarely use a VF. If tethered, then the bigger screen is certainly better. I would invest in a surface pro rather than the VF. With the IQ380, you also have iPad with capture pilot as an option, but I think the wired Surface Pro with a full C1P is more robust and flexible.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I thought that Capture Pilot only supports Live View on the 250, 350 via wifi. That may have changed with the 380 as I have not kept up. But do check with your dealer. But the 380 is CCD so even if it works the blooming delay will cause issues.

    As a tech user, Arca. I 100% would prefer Live View. When I briefly used an IQ150, I did love being able to frame the scene from the LCD on the back. The Arca viewfinder is OK, but is a bit of a hassle and as already mentioned is only giving you a close idea not exact.

    As for Live View on CCD, even with Wayne's technique which I tried, IMO it just takes too much battery and generates way to much heat on the back. In my climate, Arkansas, midsouth, but even in Colorado. You can literally feel the back get quite warm running Live View. Even with the ND filter (which will not work with wides like the 23, 28 and 32mm you get plenty of blooming and each time you make any change, either focus, or aperture you bloom, and wait for the back to settle down. Inside different story works quite well, but I went back to the Arca variofinder for most setups.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    When I first acquired a technical camera, it was the Cambo, IQ180, and the HR40 t/s. This remains my favorite combination to this day. Initially I was concerned about a viewfinder, but it really hasn't been an issue. When I had a small micro 4/3 Panasonic GF-1, it worked pretty well mimicking the approximate field of view, and doubled as a great IR camera. I had the ground glass and cambo magnifier for a while, but never really used it. After a while, you get really really good at setting up the camera quickly and composing sans viewfinder. Usually a few test shots is the most I'll need to tweak composition with movements. Sometimes I'll scan the area with a viewfinder app on my phone handheld which helps judge focal lengths used in the composition.

    With the Surface Pro tethered---you can do a lot more---although it does add some time and pack weight to the equation. I think your money would be well spent on a Surface Pro. I'll place bets the used/recertified market will open up more once the SP4 is released.

    Ken

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Another here who has a viewfinder but never uses it (IQ180). I carry the ground glass and sometimes use it for framing, especially when planning a two-image stitch. I do not use it for focusing; I use a Leica Disto for focusing.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul2660 View Post
    I thought that Capture Pilot only supports Live View on the 250, 350 via wifi. That may have changed with the 380 as I have not kept up. But do check with your dealer. But the 380 is CCD so even if it works the blooming delay will cause issues.

    Paul C
    paul, as far as I understand, the 380 will do LV with the CCD limitations over WIFI. Apparently, it is improved over the 180, but not anywhere in the same league as CMOS. I would of course confirm with a dealer and/or hands on.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by jagsiva View Post
    paul, as far as I understand, the 380 will do LV with the CCD limitations over WIFI. Apparently, it is improved over the 180, but not anywhere in the same league as CMOS. I would of course confirm with a dealer and/or hands on.
    Negative.

    Only WiFi Live View is using an IQ250 or IQ350.

    The CCD backs do not support Live View over WiFi. Though of course they do support it on the LCD on the back of the camera or on a laptop or USB-supporting tablet like the Microsoft Surface.
    Doug Peterson , Digital Transitions | Email
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by dougpeterson View Post
    Negative.

    Only WiFi Live View is using an IQ250 or IQ350.

    The CCD backs do not support Live View over WiFi. Though of course they do support it on the LCD on the back of the camera or on a laptop or USB-supporting tablet like the Microsoft Surface.
    thanks Doug, I stand corrected. Do they still support WIFI tethering without LV?

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I frame and compose roughly using the Alpa eFinder app for the iPhone with a wide angle lens adapter which gives me the correct view for the lens/sensor. Once I have the rough composition I'm after I'll set up the tripod and fine tune using live view with the MFDB.

    I have the optical viewfinders and also ground glass but I don't use them any more. The optical viewfinder is a nice alternative to the eFinder app, especially unattached to the body.
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    I frame and compose roughly using the Alpa eFinder app for the iPhone with a wide angle lens adapter which gives me the correct view for the lens/sensor. Once I have the rough composition I'm after I'll set up the tripod and fine tune using live view with the MFDB.

    I have the optical viewfinders and also ground glass but I don't use them any more. The optical viewfinder is a nice alternative to the eFinder app, especially unattached to the body.
    +1 except (with Credo 60) I don't use live view. I use the iPhone app "Mark II Artists Viewfinder" which is similar to ALPA e-finder. I use it handheld and wag it for the initial shot and revise camera position by reviewing on the rear LCD, sometimes a few iterations needed to get it just right. It goes fast. Works well. I am unconvinced that a mount is needed for the phone.

    Just bought a Moment wide angle lens and mounting plate for iPhone 6s and can't say enough good things about it. You can use the mount on (underneath) most iPhone cases which means no need to use proprietary phone case or no case at all. The lens itself is worlds better than the Schneider iPhone lens it replaces. The accessory wide angle lens is not yet supported by the "Mark II Artists viewfinder" on the iPhone 6s series (developer tells me it will be by end of month) but is supported on iPhone 6, 5s, 5 and I think the 4 and 4s.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by jagsiva View Post
    thanks Doug, I stand corrected. Do they still support WIFI tethering without LV?
    Yes. WiFi Review and Camera Control.

    Just not WiFi Live View.
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Sometimes I use a Surface Pro II with Capture One for focusing, and sometimes I start at a meaningful place through experience and test shoot one or two shots to fine tune my "guestimates." More often than not I skip using the Surface Pro II and simply enjoy shooting.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Maybe I'm missing something but I can't imagine using anything other the LCD on the back of my IQ180 for composition. I approximate just by using my eyes and experience and then compose using LV on the back. If I'm either a little long or wide it takes just 30 seconds to change lenses. ND filters aren't needed since I can just stop down. I usually ballpark focus if over 150 feet and check focus on a test shot on the LCD or just take a quick Disto reading if under 150 feet. All of this is moot if I'm using my Leaf Credo 50..... then I just use LV for everything including tilt.

    Victor
    Last edited by vjbelle; 23rd November 2015 at 10:49.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by fmueller View Post
    Just bought a Moment wide angle lens and mounting plate for iPhone 6s and can't say enough good things about it. You can use the mount on (underneath) most iPhone cases which means no need to use proprietary phone case or no case at all. The lens itself is worlds better than the Schneider iPhone lens it replaces. The accessory wide angle lens is not yet supported by the "Mark II Artists viewfinder" on the iPhone 6s series (developer tells me it will be by end of month) but is supported on iPhone 6, 5s, 5 and I think the 4 and 4s.
    I actually have the Moment Wide already ..and I was looking at picking up the 6+.

    Do you think it's worth simply enabling wifi, composing with the phone via MII AV, and then using that same screen to review? Does that app indicate shift, too?

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I think that you need to just get out and try shooting and develop a workflow. The various VF and review options all sound great in theory and you'll think that you need X or Y options but once you get used to it I'm sure you'll find very little need for various extra components.

    Most of the time you'll know what focal length you'll want (or have) and so you'll be previsualizing the scene with that. Things like the iPhone apps or optical VF will help with testing compositions before setting up the camera. After that, I've personally found the same approach as others stated works - i.e. use live view for tuning composition or shoot and adjust. With the CMOS backs you can use it for focus and tilt too (it's fabulous!) but with the 40 TS you can pretty much just dial in a base amount (1-2 degrees at normal height - if you set up low or higher then you'll need more/less) and get away with a lot more DOF that the back might suggest.

    I suspect that you'll find it a lot easier than you expect once you start shooting. You get very efficient with shooting after a while and will wonder what all the fuss was about. The only challenge that I've ever had was starting out with tilts in the absence of live view but typically only with longer lenses. In the end even that becomes second nature and starting with the 40mm it should be a lot easier to just go by the numbers. (I use snapi tilt calculator for iPhone).
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Like Anders Torger, I use a Linhof Techno with sliding back and bright ground glass to compose and focus with my Credo 60. Despite my initial reservations about the large size of the sliding back and small size of the image area on the GG (relative to 4x5" that I'm used to) I really like working this way. I use the Linhof Studio 12x loupe and it's easy to nail focus, although more difficult on extreme shifts. I demoed the CFV-50c before I got my Credo 60 to see how the live view worked–it worked very well–but for some reason I felt that looking at the screen on the back somehow removed me from the scene. I just wasn't used to the process of working that way.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I've just been through this. I bought an Alpa STC and SK48 Apo-Helvetar. The kit came with the optical viewfinder and the iPhone bracket. I've used each of those about once.

    I use the Alpa eFinder which is exactly the same app, except for camera choices, as the Artists' Viewfinder. I hand hold it to check out the scene and AOV and then I take the shot. If I need to readjust and take another shot...well I do. It's not film and it's not going to wear out appreciably taking another shot.

    Increasingly I just eyeball it, including for shifts or rise/fall. You will get to know your set up quite quickly. Initially the workflow seems quite ponderous, but soon enough you realise you actually have the world's best point and shoot camera!

    When I bought the kit I was convinced I would need the optical viewfinder etc that came with it...
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Precisely why I sold mine. Too hard to frame accurately. And with the new Phase One lenses (35mm and 40-80mm) who needs a tech cam? Well maybe if you are into to shift and stitch but I am not.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Agree with much of the above. Have shot both with sliding back and GG, happily. Also have shot with nothing but a sense,and just approximating. The good news is that with digital, the shots are free, so I just keep adjusting and composing until its satisfactory.

    As to when to use which technique, that's not quite so easy. The ground glass and sliding back is really good for control, such as serious studio type work, and some stitching. . OTOH, shooting by sense, and just chimping works well for a looser, freer way of shooting, and has its advantages too. I guess both work well. It probably has to do with the hassle of the stitching back and moving around - so if freedom to move is key, then a back directly mounted is more critical than the ground glass.

    As to which one you'll prefer, probably won't be clear until after shooting with your tech camera for a while. Hard to predict. As noted above, be wary about getting too much gear upfront, as it often sits unused.
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I use the viewfinder.

    I thought a time about buying a iphone-holder (+ a iphone; yes - I don't have one til today ). Someday I had spoken with this guy, who brought me to think about the iphone-holder:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV9460Lcuqg

    I'm shooting mostly Panorama, so it's nearly the same situation as in the video. But he told me, that's not really fun. The iphone runs out of power very often and it's not perfect, too. So if you know some day your gear it's 'nearly' the same.

    Ok. That's my experience, too. It's mostly possible to shoot good Panorma without any tool (love to shoot 3xP20 = format 2:1 after stiching). My most effective tool is the spirit level on the camera.
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by colorspace View Post
    I actually have the Moment Wide already ..and I was looking at picking up the 6+.

    Do you think it's worth simply enabling wifi, composing with the phone via MII AV, and then using that same screen to review? Does that app indicate shift, too?
    The app does show shifts and parallax corrections of course the usefulness of the latter dependent on a precise mounting on the tech cam. I can't speak to the wifi issue since I don't have a back with that feature.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by DougDolde View Post
    Precisely why I sold mine. Too hard to frame accurately. And with the new Phase One lenses (35mm and 40-80mm) who needs a tech cam? Well maybe if you are into to shift and stitch but I am not.
    I have a DF+ with SK45 and an 80.

    For the tech cam I have a Rodenstock 40 and 70. I was thunderstruck at how much better the Rodenstock's are compared to the SK lenses for the DF and how little LCC correction is needed. Using a Credo 60. All that being said, I don't earn a living with my camera and I'm not doing portraits...YMMV.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I have a Cambo WRS 600 which has a built in sliding back so I frame/focus on ground glass without having to remove and replace the DB. That said after the initial compositions fine tuning is done by "feel" and checking on the SP3.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by colorspace View Post
    Before my WRS 1200/Rod. 40TS arrives (I've got a 380 back) I'm just trying to get all my ducks in a row so I can hit the ground running. For ~$1000 I can pick up a viewfinder, mask and Leica D2 and take my iPad along for the ride. For possibly the same amount (give or take) I can pick up a Surface Pro.. which is what I think a lot of people have been gravitating towards lately.

    What is everyone's 'preferred' method? If I never plan on shooting handheld, is anything lost from not having the viewfinder? Is it worth getting both?

    ..Does anyone shoot without either?

    Input greatly appreciated.
    I own a IQ160 and an RM3Di Arca w/ the Rodenstock HR-W 40mm and 70mm lenses and even though I have the optical external Arca Swiss viewfinder which is awesome most of the time I do not use it. After a while you get used to the angle of view of your lens/back combination and generally can setup and then use the live view to fine tune the composition. I do however walk around with the viewfinder in my hand first some times (before taking the camera out) looking for shots but most times I just look with my bare eyes. I find the rudimentary live view of the IQ160 more than usable for composing images. It is really an awesome tool to have.

    Also, forgot to mention that I also own the ground glass for the body but never use it. I have the back mounted on a rotamount so I can rotate the back without ever removing it. Generally I have the camera all setup in my bag with the back and 40mm lens mounted and ready to go.

    Also of note is that the Rodenstock 40mm lens is STUNNING. Best lens I have ever used. Period. Well, I have played with some Cooke and Arri cine lenses which are also superb but this Rodenstock is basically close to flawless.

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    Workshop Member Bryan Stephens's Avatar
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_R View Post
    Also of note is that the Rodenstock 40mm lens is STUNNING. Best lens I have ever used. Period. Well, I have played with some Cooke and Arri cine lenses which are also superb but this Rodenstock is basically close to flawless.
    It was my favorite lens to use on my Cambo with the IQ180 and IQ260.
    Bryan

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    Senior Member danlindberg's Avatar
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I shoot mainly without any kind of aid at all. I compose freely and this includes with shift. I love this kind of purity and do not feel hampered at all, not by precision and not by speed.
    However, I sometimes cheat....and bring the sportsfinder. Weighs nothing is more accurate than you might think.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I used a Cambo WRS for a little over 8-years until just this past month when I decided to leave it for the new XF. That said here's a little of my experiences "seeing" with a tech camera...

    I remember that my biggest fear was just that; how was I going to "see" the scene as I set it up. In the early days I used a combination of groundglass and viewfinder and very quickly found I really didn't need either. Since the majority of my work is landscape I found that I was able to visualize what I wanted just using my eyes head close to the top of the WRS and I sold both.

    A couple years later Cambo came out with a slightly better groundglass that I used for about a year before that too was sold and I reverted to my tried and true method of "seeing".

    Then I had a conversation with Ken Doo on day shortly before the first Surface was released with both of us agreeing that this could very well be a game changer for tethering to a Phase IQ series back. Turns out we were correct. I used first a SP2 and then the larger SP3 to tether my IQ180/WRS running C1 and was very pleased. In the beginning I used it well over 80% of the time I broke out the WRS and later on about 50% of the time depending of the location and other circumstances.

    The best advise I can give is practice, practice and more practice using nothing more than your naked tech camera (no viewfinders or groundglass or for that matter tethered). I found I quickly developed a work habit of 3-captures; one dead center of where I wanted, and one slightly off to either side (could be side or top and bottom depending on the location). Using all 3-files and cropping down to what I wanted to portray saved a bunch of money of groundglass and viewfinders.

    Hope this helps some and good luck.

    Don
    Don Libby
    Iron Creek Photography
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    Tucson AZ

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    A related topic...

    How do people previsualise stitched images? I do a lot of 6x12 stitched panoramics and often wondered if other camera systems have GG setups with large enough surface area and making for this? Do people just use the iPhone app thing mentioned above, or what?

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    A related topic...

    How do people previsualise stitched images? I do a lot of 6x12 stitched panoramics and often wondered if other camera systems have GG setups with large enough surface area and making for this? Do people just use the iPhone app thing mentioned above, or what?
    I think the viewfinder shows you what shifting will achieve.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    The Cambo optical viewfinder?

    Quote Originally Posted by colorspace View Post
    I think the viewfinder shows you what shifting will achieve.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    A related topic...

    How do people previsualise stitched images? I do a lot of 6x12 stitched panoramics and often wondered if other camera systems have GG setups with large enough surface area and making for this? Do people just use the iPhone app thing mentioned above, or what?
    This is why I sometimes carry the GG. It is the only way I know of in the field to see the stitched image. You can get close with apps like the Alpa eFinder, but the GG tells you exactly what you will get. I don't always need to see the completed stitched image, but occasionally it helps me. Three masks with the STC and a 40x54 sensor: 40x54, 54x76 and 40x90 (max shift 18mm each way).

    Dave
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by dchew View Post
    This is why I sometimes carry the GG. It is the only way I know of in the field to see the stitched image. You can get close with apps like the Alpa eFinder, but the GG tells you exactly what you will get. I don't always need to see the completed stitched image, but occasionally it helps me. Three masks with the STC and a 40x54 sensor: 40x54, 54x76 and 40x90 (max shift 18mm each way).

    Dave
    Try a stitching back. There are a few - Linhof makes two or three, but two aftermarket ones are by Kapture Group and Silvestri. The KG has a large GG and very bright, the Silvestri more secure interlocks. On the KG, you pick which stitching boundary you want from the GG (such as two vertical, three vertical, two horiz.), adjust a knob, and slide it till it clicks. All pretty easy. For pre visualizing, it is quite good and easy to use.

    Both have replaceable mounts both for the camera and the back.

    Really good in studio, nice for slow landscape, not so fast for moving around a lot. Just another piece of gear to be mounted.
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I use the same kind of method as Dan on this one. I prefer to feel my composition and do it freely. I've tried using viewfinders and found they take away from the unique feeling of using a tech camera, and sometimes make it even harder to compose.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Thanks Geoff,
    I have the Linhof sliding back and their new bright GG. Both are great and I really like them, but the bright GG is only marginally bigger than the single frame Dalsa 60 sensor size (it has markings for both orientations with about 5mm of space outside each. I really like it, save for the inability to see easily a stitched 6x12 panoramic landscape frame. I might need to upgrade my horribly slow iPhone 4 and get that iPhone app and accessory lens...

    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Try a stitching back. There are a few - Linhof makes two or three, but two aftermarket ones are by Kapture Group and Silvestri. The KG has a large GG and very bright, the Silvestri more secure interlocks. On the KG, you pick which stitching boundary you want from the GG (such as two vertical, three vertical, two horiz.), adjust a knob, and slide it till it clicks. All pretty easy. For pre visualizing, it is quite good and easy to use.

    Both have replaceable mounts both for the camera and the back.

    Really good in studio, nice for slow landscape, not so fast for moving around a lot. Just another piece of gear to be mounted.

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    Thanks Geoff,
    I have the Linhof sliding back and their new bright GG. Both are great and I really like them, but the bright GG is only marginally bigger than the single frame Dalsa 60 sensor size (it has markings for both orientations with about 5mm of space outside each. I really like it, save for the inability to see easily a stitched 6x12 panoramic landscape frame.
    I tried a KG back with maxwell optics side by side with the Linhof a couple of days ago. I envy the small size of the KG back, but there's some play in it due nylon strip sliders rather than pressurizing felt + metal against metal like in the Linhof back, and the Maxwell Optics glass while bright it's lacking resolution (and even smaller than Linhof's), considerably more difficult to focus peak than the Linhof GG. My guess is that the best GG on the market is Linhof's, but it's unfortunately also the most expensive...

    Anyway, I assume you only occasionally shoot 6x12, and as it's stitched the process is quite slow. Then maybe you could also temporarily swap ground glass to the standard one with its large surface and stitch markings. It won't be as bright though, but maybe it's better than guessing the sides?
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Hi Anders, thanks for the tip.
    I was under the impression that the original GG wasn't big enough either, but maybe I'm wrong? If it is, then I'd most definately get it (and the fresnel) to help with my panoramic stitching issue...
    I shoot quite a few panoramic images now, as I have an ongoing project that lends itself to it. Will get in contact with Paula again when she's back from holiday, I guess!

    Quote Originally Posted by torger View Post
    I tried a KG back with maxwell optics side by side with the Linhof a couple of days ago. I envy the small size of the KG back, but there's some play in it due nylon strip sliders rather than pressurizing felt + metal against metal like in the Linhof back, and the Maxwell Optics glass while bright it's lacking resolution (and even smaller than Linhof's), considerably more difficult to focus peak than the Linhof GG. My guess is that the best GG on the market is Linhof's, but it's unfortunately also the most expensive...

    Anyway, I assume you only occasionally shoot 6x12, and as it's stitched the process is quite slow. Then maybe you could also temporarily swap ground glass to the standard one with its large surface and stitch markings. It won't be as bright though, but maybe it's better than guessing the sides?

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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    I was under the impression that the original GG wasn't big enough either, but maybe I'm wrong?
    Uhhh... no :-( when thinking a bit more about it I think it's only the 17mm left/right 49x37 stitch markings that is available on ground glass, so you're right it will probably not work :-/
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    Re: Preferred method of 'seeing' with tech cams

    I sent an email to Linhof today to ask, so I guess they'll only confirm what you've told me here. Bummer!

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