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Thread: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    HSS is a series of super fast pulsed light that covers the entire time the focal plane shutter slit travels across the sensor. In many cases the speed-light is using maximum energy.
    Actually, the total maximum energy of the flash is spread over the pulses. The effect on flash power is equivalent to using a ND filter.


    I hope Profoto offers TTL and HSS for Sony … I'm sure TTL will be done eventually, but I'm not sure about HSS.

    Until then I'll soldier on with Leaf Shutter lenses.
    Profoto HSS is interesting for people using a 24x36 camera. These DSLRs usually have a sync speed of 1/250s (only 2-3 times slower than a CS in typical use), so compared to a CS, the flash power is only divided by 2 or 3. Carrying twice the amount of flash heads on a shoot is usually doable and people may prefer more lights and a 24x36 to a MF camera with a central shutter.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by jerome_m View Post
    Actually, the total maximum energy of the flash is spread over the pulses. The effect on flash power is equivalent to using a ND filter.

    Profoto HSS is interesting for people using a 24x36 camera. These DSLRs usually have a sync speed of 1/250s (only 2-3 times slower than a CS in typical use), so compared to a CS, the flash power is only divided by 2 or 3. Carrying twice the amount of flash heads on a shoot is usually doable and people may prefer more lights and a 24x36 to a MF camera with a central shutter.
    Your first statement depends on how you define "maximum energy" … all flash delivers maximum energy with the amount of light hitting the subject (exposure) varied by the duration that the flash stays on, not the amount. Each flash stores a defined level of energy, and how much of that energy is used depends on the duration it is on. Otherwise, recycle times would always be the same, which they are not, even when using HSS. However, in most situations, a speed-light is using near or all power available, and so is the new Profoto HSS feature on the B1 and B2 TTL Monos … as mentioned by Profoto:

    "To ensure a perfect exposure and a stable flash pulse, the B1 uses only the upper part of its power range when in HSS Mode. That is 7.0-10.0 for Canon and 8.0-10.0 for Nikon. For the B2 the energy range is 7-10 for both Canon and Nikon. Know that one f-stop of flash light is lost for every doubling of the shutter speed. In other words, when shooting with the extremely short shutter speeds that Profoto HSS offers, the B1 and B2 will in most cases be used at its max or near max power."

    The difference between 7 and 10 power setting on a B1 is faster recycle (about 1.3 seconds verses 1.9 seconds at full power setting) … A typical speed-light at or near full power is 5 to 5.5 seconds recycle (an eternity). To match the total output of the B1/500 with speed-lights (70W/s), you'd need 6+ of them ganged in one modifier with a radio receiver … it is just physics. Plus shooting a speed-light at or near full power consistently beats the snot out of them … and repeated HSS shots can and does cause a thermal shut down, (been there, done that).

    RE: Your second statement … HSS may be of interest for anyone using a focal plane shutter camera, not just FF 35mm users. What is quite true is that most photographers do not have as high a demand for working with HSS and lighting. So, even if speed-lights are limited in use compared to leaf-shutter cameras, ganging a couple of TTL/HSS speed-lights is obviously the more prudent path.

    For others who face this more frequently, especially for pay, leaf-shutter cameras in tandem with any strobe lighting or speed-light is HSS @ 1/800, 1/1000 or 1/1600 depending on the camera, and the less limited ability to light larger scenes with larger modifiers at distance is a must have ability depending on the photographers approach, ideas, style and desire to concentrate on the subject at hand rather than the mechanics of taking the image.

    As usual, Horses for courses.

    - Marc
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  3. #53
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    Your first statement depends on how you define "maximum energy" … all flash delivers maximum energy with the amount of light hitting the subject (exposure) varied by the duration that the flash stays on, not the amount.
    That actually depends on flash circuit design. Older studio flashes only charged the capacitor bank partially when power was reduced. Small on-camera strobes quite early had a thyristor to cut the power to the tube during flash, effectively varying flash duration to vary output, but the cut power was limited to relatively small flashes. Now that higher power thyristors are available, you'll find the same design in studio strobes, most notably Profoto. A thyristor cut being a necessity for HSS, HSS now becomes available on moderate power studio flashes (but not on the 3000 Ws monsters...).

    This being said, we could discuss electronic design all day, but the photographer's summary is quite simple: you have a flash which has a power of, say, 500 Ws. Between with a shutter with a sync speed of 1/X (say, 1/800s) and a shutter of 1/Y (say 1/125s), if you need to cut continuous light and whatever the process you use for doing so (HSS, ultrasync or filters), the effect of the flash is divided by X/Y between the two systems.

    For example: X=800 and Y=125, the power is cut by 6.4, so you 500 Ws flash behaves like a 80 Ws flash.
    Other example: X=1/500 (Hasseblad H) and Y=1/300 (Minolta 9xi), the apparent power is only cut by 1.7.
    Still other example: X=1/1600 (Phase One) and Y=1/125 (Pentax 645z), the apparent power is cut by 12.8.


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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    What I find most interesting is what this brings up as as a discussion point: Historically (and I suspect presently) MFDB manufacturers have seen their prime customers as the working pros in commercial fashion, studio and advertising. Will this now morph toward the serious hobbyist/artist? I for one think probably so...
    Thanks for writing this Jack. I'm very much like your Chinese friend and the author or this article. I run a commercial portrait studio in Michigan. For years I drooled over a medium format system. Finally, almost 4 years ago I decided to make the addition. It took me a little while before I settled on a Phase One camera with Credo back. I knew all of the shortcomings of the system and was prepared to deal with it. For me, DSLRs had become too good. They did practically everything for you. I wanted to slow down and be more deliberate. Plus I wanted extremely detailed images with great color. I wanted to be rewarded for the relative pain of capture. My system (Phase One 645DF, V-Grip, Credo 60, assortment of SK lenses) does exactly what I was looking for. However, the article's #2 issue (the continued expense of P1 stuff) is what has really gotten under my skin over the past several months. It started with the cost of the SK 40-80mm lens. $9K? Really!? Then after waiting for a body that focused reliably, out comes the XF. But $8K! That's more than the Pentax 645Z complete with 50MP sensor. When I bought into the Phase system, the cost of entry was high. But I was fine with that. I viewed it as an entry fee. However, I thought that subsequent expenditures would be incremental. The XF price tag for those with legacy P1 bodies is ridiculous IMO. I had a discussion with Doug from Digital Transitions about the issue of pros vs. amateur enthusiasts. I'm sorry, with the advent of the Nikon D800 series, the Canon 5DS series, and the Sony A7RII, I just can't see MFD gear being enticing to profit driven pros. While my P1 system has delivered what I was after, there are several things that make shooting it a substandard tool compared to what's currently available irrespective of the price difference.

    Here's the main failing as of right now. Flash systems. If you're a landscape or technical photographer, you might not care about flash systems. However, in the portrait/fashion world, it's a completely different ballgame. First of all, all these modern DSLR cameras producing super clean extremely high ISO images, everybody is a "natural light" photographer. In challenging lighting conditions a trained monkey can get a good technical image (accurate exposure and sharp focus). Therefore, we no longer need auxiliary lighting for their light in many cases. Instead, I need light today to craft my images so they look way different than what somebody with a high ISO camera is capable of capturing. I'm truly using light as a paint brush rather than just a light source. The tools to do this are way more convenient when using DSLRs than MFG. For instance, take the Profoto B series strobes. They have TTL and HSS when used with Canikon gear. Locking in your desired "look" via TTL, then locking down the power levels and shooting manual fron then on is a TREMENDOUS benefit. But you can't do that with MFD gear. Take the Canon 600 series flash system, nothing like that for MFD gear. And Nikon just released their radio controlled flash system. If Phase released something like this we'd probably be looking at a $8000-$10000 system.

    Anyway, I'm writing out my frustrations as I really like shooting my Phase gear. But honestly, as a professional studio operation, it's an indulgence that doesn't currently return any significant benefit. In fact, I'm coming to the conclusion it's actually a detriment. I love the resolution and detail of my Credo 60. Which is probably why instead of upgrading to an XF, I'll upgrade to a 5Dsr for less than half the cost. I don't know if I'm at the point where I'm going to sell my Phase stuff (feel like a failure and take a bath on price), but I'm close. However, I should add that the native sync speed of my SK 75-150 lens is what is keeping me from pulling the "sell" trigger. My business is in transition (all I want to do is classic studio portraiture) and I just don't know how much outdoor portraiture I'll be doing in the future. As long as that remains an unknown, I'll probably continue to keep my MFD gear.
    Last edited by Mgreer316; 18th April 2016 at 13:53.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Interesting subject:

    I've observed photography as a profession undergo a massive transition in the past decade. However, "professional" is a wide swath, and involves varying levels of demand and success.

    I would say that pros dealing with the public directly (weddings/events/portraits/family/babies/pets) have less perceptual need for MF in any configuration anymore. In fact, weddings/events made the transition from MF to 35mm long before digital came on the scene. In my experience, "public" tastes and expectations have gravitated downward in terms of the type of image quality and end use that MFD is capable of delivering.

    I've watched the business model for weddings/events go from print/album income to virtually nothing ... yes, there are exceptions, but I'm taking "in general" industry wide. Wedding photography income has remained stagnate for almost a decade now, and in some demographic categories has significantly declined.

    Advertising for publications (product, lifestyle, food, and tabletop such a jewelry etc), and other commercial work like industrial and corporate ... we're slower to change and only recently have become prime targets for the higher resolution 35mm cameras. Part of the reason for this is the shift in what the photographer can line item invoice compared to just a few years ago.

    When the publication and printing industries switched over to digital is was swift and traumatic. Commercial and studio photographers who shot film were then competing with those who adopted digital capture. While the cost of digital was staggering (just like it is today), those costs could be recovered by line itemizing rental or usage fees. For a typical day shoot, I could bill a $1,200 digital capture fee. Clients paid it because it was cheaper than the film/processing/scanning costs and they got the images immediately. It only took 10 to 12 day shoots to pay for a digital back for my Hasselblad V system ... which in a typical year became a separate profit center, especially when writing off the gear on taxes. Two years later I'd repeat the process with a new digital back. In essence, I never paid for any of this stuff out of pocket ... and to this day I'm still cruising on those earlier "salad days" of pro MFD capture ... but only a little bit since semi-retiring.

    Now that business model has all but evaporated except for a few major clients. Everyone is digital, and buyers are more cost conscience than ever before. If you are paying for the gear with no way to recover costs except with your business acumen and talent ... the gear costs comes under more scrutiny.

    IMO, these days the biggest differentiator for semi and full-time pro photographer is lighting ... more than what camera. Where a MF camera can help is if it a leaf-shutter capable system. It is one key reason I maintain a Leica S system ... high sync speed ... I do a lot of outdoor commercial and people photography and I'm located in Florida all winter, and Michigan in the summer. I don't have a brick and mortar studio so use a portion of my homes in both places. Neither are light tight so higher sync even helps there on occasion.

    The only part of the previous post that I question is the need for TTL strobes ... I have a TTL radio triggered flash set up for my Sony A7R-II and it is hardly all that convenient since the compensation takes just as much time effort as adjusting strobes with the AIR sender ...

    - Marc
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Unlike Marc I can't speak to the industry in general but the limited exposure I have to landscape (basically workshop and limited print income driven ) professionals and baby shooters is that there is no compelling reason for either to go MF these days. They can't afford it from a business perspective.

    Interestingly the ones making good money that I know personally are women semi-pro baby photographers who seem to have a very steady income stream, at least the ones I know who shoot high art quality images. However, none of the ones I know personally shoot MF today, although lighting is one of their differentiators from what I've seen.

    Just to reiterate, these are the half dozen or so pro shooters I know personally, half of which do make incomes but with the baby market not other commercial endeavors. I know that Marc and others here have a MUCH bigger pro pool to base opinions from.

    In my world, other than a single hold out MF Digital guy I know locally, it's only my amateur friends who shoot MF Digital as their primary platform. (I'm ignoring my buddies Ed, Ken, Don, Jeffrey et al in all of this as whilst I know them all personally I have no idea how they're doing professionally and would never ask anyway).

    Btw, the only pro I know locally who shoots MF digital is very happy shooting with his P45+ on a DF+. We all worry about gear quality a LOT more than he does. He just earns a living ...
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    I discussed this very topic (pro vs amateur use of MFD gear) with Doug Peterson on Facebook a number of months ago. I don't know if he remembers or not. Maybe he'll chime in here. But I tried to explain to him that as a pro trying to earn a living when you're investing your own money, making the case for MFD is almost impossible. When I spoke to my Halsey rep 5 years ago he told me the vast majority of their clients were in fact well heeled enthusiasts. Doug claims that's not the case for Phase One. I was specifically referring to buys, not rentals. I find it hard to believe that Phase One use amongst pros is growing,ehich is what he said. If so, more power to them.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamWelland View Post
    Interestingly the ones making good money that I know personally are women semi-pro baby photographers who seem to have a very steady income stream, at least the ones I know who shoot high art quality images. However, none of the ones I know personally shoot MF today, although lighting is one of their differentiators from what I've seen.
    My fiancee does baby shoots and I've gone along on a couple. From my experience, babies move around a lot and the autofocus limitations of MF compared to canon/nikon/sony would make a baby shoot with MF a headache and you'd have less "keepers" with MF. I even had trouble nailing shallow DOF shots with a D800E/70-200mm on the last one I did a couple months ago. Lighting and stopping down would obviously help and someone more skilled than I would probably have less trouble. Personlly I'd rather use a system with face tracking AF for babies than MF. I also found that razor sharp detail isn't something that's necessarily desirable for the finished product of baby pictures, so I feel like MF would be overkill. Skin tones/colors may be better with MF but that was never something those types of clients seem to fuss about....especially because baby pics do well with black and white conversion. I've also never heard from her that one of her clients wanted to blow up a baby photo to 30"x40" or an otherwise huge print, so the resolution of MF (even of the D800/810/A7r/A7rii/5DS) is overkill. Also, FWIW, she made more money and had more jobs when she was shooting with a Nikon D90 and 50mm f1.4D than she did with a D800E or her current Fuji X-T1. That market sector seems to be relatively gear-agnostic IMHO.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    my clients see a funny little bellows camera with a bellows lens hood, they then see the crisp images shot with schneider digitar lenses appear on screen and seem happy enough to give me repeat business.
    they didn’t question anything when a P45 was used or a 5DIII but like most people running a business spending 5k or 25k but not increasing revenue by a similar proportion means it just doesnt make sense to spend big.
    that said a lot of people mention the word ‘hate’ when discussing recent MF/35mm type threads. this suggests they have some kind of emotional involvement with their personal purchasing decisions and like to post rationalise with peer led affirmation. so they see this questioning as some kind of personal attack.
    apart from a few oddballs with an axe to grind does anyone really hate a camera system/company that much?

    i do think that MFD has shot itself in the foot over the last few years but now seem to be coming back on track and i think thats down to Hblad getting back to what it does best and the outlier that is Pentax shaking things up a bit. but the big push has come from sony and their sensor.
    i might come back to MF but there has to be a compelling reason to invest and at the moment it’s not quite there for me, though h/blad might change that.
    never trust the opinion of anyone who lists a load of gear in their forum signature. Dealers do not email me asking to buy your products.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Mgreer316 View Post
    For instance, take the Profoto B series strobes. They have TTL and HSS when used with Canikon gear. Locking in your desired "look" via TTL, then locking down the power levels and shooting manual fron then on is a TREMENDOUS benefit. But you can't do that with MFD gear. Take the Canon 600 series flash system, nothing like that for MFD gear. And Nikon just released their radio controlled flash system. If Phase released something like this we'd probably be looking at a $8000-$10000 system.
    The Profoto Air remote allows you to control the light packs (I use Profoto 8a, Profoto B4 and Profoto B-1) directly from the remote mounted on the camera’s hotshoe. You can easily control the lighting ratios from the camera even if your camera doesn’t have TTL.

    I use a flash meter to set my lights. If any other adjustments need to be made I use the Air remote which has clearly indicated minus / plus buttons.

    In regards to light crafting. I find one of the best ways to add character to lighting is by experimenting with different modifiers. Something as simple as feathering the light can create some nice lighting effects. I rely heavily on scrims and flags to even further finesse how the light falls on the subject. Matthews makes a great portable kit called “Roadrags”.

    The profoto B-1s are very portable and setup quickly. However they are handicapped due to having only 500 watts of power. This is definitely not enough to overpower the sun, especially when used with a very large modifier. For example if you use a 74 inch octabank, you would have to place the light inches from the subject to have the correct intensity of light for a suitable f-stop when shooting outside in bright sunny conditions. (of course when you are shooting with a leaf shutter lens you have a wider range of shutter speed / f-stop options). I tend to use my B-1 kit as edge lights fitted with a Profoto Magnum reflector.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mgreer316 View Post
    Anyway, I'm writing out my frustrations as I really like shooting my Phase gear. But honestly, as a professional studio operation, it's an indulgence that doesn't currently return any significant benefit. In fact, I'm coming to the conclusion it's actually a detriment. I love the resolution and detail of my Credo 60. Which is probably why instead of upgrading to an XF, I'll upgrade to a 5Dsr for less than half the cost.
    How each professional finances his photography equipment purchases is a complex subject. I have been able to retain a good mix of clients who allow a digital fee charge that helps maintain my XF + IQ260 system (And my Canon Kit). Other photographers have set-up two companies, one for their photography business and the other for production. That separate production company allows them to rent gear back to the photography company. Depending upon the scope of the production this is way to pay for everything from a lowly C-clamps to your Hassy or P-1 digital backs. Equipment finances are spread out from a small corporate headshot to a large complex advertising shoot with a goal toward paying overhead and making a profit. (I know a certain forum member G-R-A-H-A-M who will help you spend it.....)

    Just food for thought. Hope this helps.

    Thank you.

    If in the end you decide to go the 35mm route, then I highly suggest you rent the Canon first before purchasing just to make sure you like how the skin tones look in the files.
    Last edited by Jeffery Salter; 19th April 2016 at 10:34.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    my clients see a funny little bellows camera with a bellows lens hood

    may i ask what kind of lenshood / compendium you are using with the actus / schneider lens combo ?

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    may i ask what kind of lenshood / compendium you are using with the actus / schneider lens combo ?

    It's a Lee one that I bought 15 years ago for 5x4 it had fallen apart as the glue failed between mount and bellows but Lee sent me some new industrial strength double sided tape to fix it. Think it's the 105 system? I just got some adapter rings from eBay for the small digitars so I could use the old mounting rings from the bigger 5x4 lenses.
    never trust the opinion of anyone who lists a load of gear in their forum signature. Dealers do not email me asking to buy your products.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    It's a Lee one that I bought 15 years ago for 5x4 it had fallen apart as the glue failed between mount and bellows but Lee sent me some new industrial strength double sided tape to fix it. Think it's the 105 system? I just got some adapter rings from eBay for the small digitars so I could use the old mounting rings from the bigger 5x4 lenses.
    thanks ! don´t understand why cambo has not thought about a compendium to use with the actus.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    my clients see a funny little bellows camera with a bellows lens hood, they then see the crisp images shot with schneider digitar lenses appear on screen and seem happy enough to give me repeat business.
    they didn’t question anything when a P45 was used or a 5DIII but like most people running a business spending 5k or 25k but not increasing revenue by a similar proportion means it just doesnt make sense to spend big.
    that said a lot of people mention the word ‘hate’ when discussing recent MF/35mm type threads. this suggests they have some kind of emotional involvement with their personal purchasing decisions and like to post rationalise with peer led affirmation. so they see this questioning as some kind of personal attack.
    apart from a few oddballs with an axe to grind does anyone really hate a camera system/company that much?

    i do think that MFD has shot itself in the foot over the last few years but now seem to be coming back on track and i think thats down to Hblad getting back to what it does best and the outlier that is Pentax shaking things up a bit. but the big push has come from sony and their sensor.
    i might come back to MF but there has to be a compelling reason to invest and at the moment it’s not quite there for me, though h/blad might change that.
    IMO there is kind of an inflation of photography. In digital world more and more images come on the market. Also with search functions and internet and email there are more resources to get images of things happening in the world. Prices paid to photographers have gone down.
    So I do know photographers which have moved to MF gear because they want to be able to offer that little bit better IQ which can set there images apart from the mass production.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Paratom View Post
    IMO there is kind of an inflation of photography. In digital world more and more images come on the market. Also with search functions and internet and email there are more resources to get images of things happening in the world. Prices paid to photographers have gone down.
    So I do know photographers which have moved to MF gear because they want to be able to offer that little bit better IQ which can set there images apart from the mass production.
    ....when you have zero to offer on the creative side of photography than sure a little resolution advantage counts big !

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    ....when you have zero to offer on the creative side of photography than sure a little resolution advantage counts big !
    That's a bit like saying those who can't write and compose beautifully in 30 pages will write a 300 page book.
    Or mediocre directors make 2 hour movies because they aren't creative enough to make a 15 min reel.
    Just saying...

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by satybhat View Post
    That's a bit like saying those who can't write and compose beautifully in 30 pages will write a 300 page book.
    Or mediocre directors make 2 hour movies because they aren't creative enough to make a 15 min reel.
    Just saying...
    ....does a sharper knife and better ingredients make a bad cook a top chef ? maybe, but i have never ever seen that mediocre, styleless images improve with resolution. it is far more work and much harder to accomplish to develop a personal style than to buy some gear and pretend that now the images have an magical look.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Paratom View Post
    So I do know photographers which have moved to MF gear because they want to be able to offer that little bit better IQ which can set there images apart from the mass production.
    Are you suggesting MFD will make me a better photographer? I guess there are plenty of people who think like that but I don't.
    Spending time with other creatives, watching films, travel, architecture, talking to my partner (an art director) about imagery, playing around with Instagram/iPhone and more importantly shooting outside of my comfort zone make me a better image maker.
    This weekend I'm B-camera on a short promo for film with a tiny crew and a well known actor. No money involved but I would rather donate my time to this than a faux-workshop dealer weekend where you get to play with gear and chew the fat with a tech-head.
    never trust the opinion of anyone who lists a load of gear in their forum signature. Dealers do not email me asking to buy your products.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffery Salter View Post
    The Profoto Air remote allows you to control the light packs (I use Profoto 8a, Profoto B4 and Profoto B-1) directly from the remote mounted on the camera’s hotshoe. You can easily control the lighting ratios from the camera even if your camera doesn’t have TTL.

    I use a flash meter to set my lights. If any other adjustments need to be made I use the Air remote which has clearly indicated minus / plus buttons.
    Hi Jeffery, thanks for chiming in. I'm very aware of the available options. I shoot 645DF with a V-Grip Air. It triggers my B1. I also have the Air Remote TT-L C (for Canon cameras) when I use the B1 with my 5D MKIII (or if I want to set power levels remotely when I'm shooting the 645DF). So yes, controling power levels remotely on the B1 is easily done via the remote. But that' wasn't my point. My point was that I don't need a light meter when shooting with my 5D MKIII as TTL gets me very close to where I want to be then I make an adjustment, lock it in, and away I go. I can't do that with the 645DF. So I use a meter or a guess, then adjust. But in multi light applications it's much faster for me when I start the TTL route. I know Marc doesn't think so, but this is my experience and it's definitely faster for me. But whether it is or it isn't, the point is the option doesn't exist for MFD. With the amount of money invested in MFD gear we should have more options, not less IMO.

    The profoto B-1s are very portable and setup quickly. However they are handicapped due to having only 500 watts of power. This is definitely not enough to overpower the sun, especially when used with a very large modifier. For example if you use a 74 inch octabank, you would have to place the light inches from the subject to have the correct intensity of light for a suitable f-stop when shooting outside in bright sunny conditions. (of course when you are shooting with a leaf shutter lens you have a wider range of shutter speed / f-stop options). I tend to use my B-1 kit as edge lights fitted with a Profoto Magnum reflector.
    All true depending on your requirements. The B1 does offer me enough power to over power the sun because in such applications I tend to shoot it bare. I'm not carrying big modifiers on location. I'm just too lazy for that. If I needed more power I'd take multiple Einsteins.

    If in the end you decide to go the 35mm route, then I highly suggest you rent the Canon first before purchasing just to make sure you like how the skin tones look in the files.
    From everything I've seen there's no significant difference in coloration between the 5DSr and the 5D MKIII. If so, I'm good.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    ....does a sharper knife and better ingredients make a bad cook a top chef ?
    On the other hand, dull knifes and bad ingredients sure never made better food.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    ...I would rather donate my time to this than a faux-workshop dealer weekend where you get to play with gear and chew the fat with a tech-head.
    A thinly veiled prejudice, uninformed and a misrepresentation of the carmel get together. This sort of comment should be seen for what it is
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    The question "will X make me a better photographer" is a red herring.

    Changing cameras might not make you a better photographer, but it might yield better photographs.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Mgreer316 View Post
    Hi Jeffery, thanks for chiming in. I'm very aware of the available options. I shoot 645DF with a V-Grip Air. It triggers my B1. I also have the Air Remote TT-L C (for Canon cameras) when I use the B1 with my 5D MKIII (or if I want to set power levels remotely when I'm shooting the 645DF). So yes, controling power levels remotely on the B1 is easily done via the remote. But that' wasn't my point. My point was that I don't need a light meter when shooting with my 5D MKIII as TTL gets me very close to where I want to be then I make an adjustment, lock it in, and away I go. I can't do that with the 645DF. So I use a meter or a guess, then adjust. But in multi light applications it's much faster for me when I start the TTL route. I know Marc doesn't think so, but this is my experience and it's definitely faster for me. But whether it is or it isn't, the point is the option doesn't exist for MFD. With the amount of money invested in MFD gear we should have more options, not less IMO.
    I'd definitely agree that with MFD we should have more options ... no question.

    If Profoto added a Phase One, Hasselblad H and a Leica S TTL remote it would be excellent no doubt. I also doubt it would be a priority for Profoto since the amount of prospective buyers pales compared to Nikon, Canon and possibly Sony. I'd think they'll do a Sony one sooner if not later.

    Personally, I haven't used a light meter for a long time. I basically do the same thing you do with TTL ... get it close on the first shot because I know the configuration, and then refine with the Profoto Remote channel assigned to each head. In far to many cases, I am going for creative use of lighting where TTL becomes a bit more complicated verses just setting a rim or edge light hotter for example.

    But, whatever works for each of us.

    - Marc

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by jerome_m View Post
    On the other hand, dull knifes and bad ingredients sure never made better food.
    you sure had 8x10 film in mind when you wrote this and not this tiny little sensors of todays mf cameras, right ;-)

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    you sure had 8x10 film in mind when you wrote this and not this tiny little sensors of todays mf cameras, right ;-)
    If I were using a chemical process, I would rather use something bigger than 8"x10". Have you heard of Richard Learoyd direct to Ilfochrome prints? http://www.theguardian.com/artanddes...useum-artworks
    http://time.com/3776629/uncomfortabl...yds-presences/

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by jerome_m View Post
    If I were using a chemical process, I would rather use something bigger than 8"x10". Have you heard of Richard Learoyd direct to Ilfochrome prints? http://www.theguardian.com/artanddes...useum-artworks
    http://time.com/3776629/uncomfortabl...yds-presences/
    that´s cool and interesting, i do wet plates since a few month

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    Smile Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Very interesting perspective.
    I used to be a Nikon guy for many years. D3 then D3X then D800 and then D810. I decided to take the jump in to MF and bought a Credo 60 MPDB and a 645DF+ with primes. I was just blown away by the MF look. I am really an amateur, but I do photography for my wife's art work. She needs good photos (high res original photos without any post production) to send in to art galleries before they showcase her work. I have a 5K IMAC and she would always select the MF photos. Every single time. My son is an actor and I do some head shots or outdoor location photos for him when we setup on vacation. He would always pick the MF photos. Every single time. My wife also simply loved the amazing realistic detail and the 3-D effect the MF images created as opposed to the crisp and at times too harsh transitions from the Nikon D810. All my photography is with available light and with prime lenses. My family just hate the effect of flash photography and refuse to pose for photos while my wife had her own lighting for the art work and insisted on the shadows that such light would cast on her art work. So no flash!! When the XF body became compatible with Credo 60 DB and I was able to upgrade to it, photography became so much easier. The focusing was dead on and much faster, so both, wife and son, loved it. The waist level viewfinder made it even better to take artwork photos of sculptures hanging from ceilings and such. The anti vibration function was great but I used tripod and mirror up most of the time for art anyway. After a while I realized that although I carried the D810 and its lenses with me, i never used it. It helped to have the same battery that went in the Credo also go in the XF body so I was never left wanting. Anyhow, to make a long story short, I finally sold the D810 and all its lenses and bought a couple of high res P1 lenses to complete my focal length needs. I am happy with this now as I do not have to carry two separate gear with me. For pros, I can see how a FF camera could be a good backup to a MF setup in case something went wrong with the MF. It is slightly lighter (just slightly,especially if you use Prime manual focus Zeis lenses or such) and may be good for video or such. If it were me I would just get another XF/DF+ body and a used MFDB as a backup as I could use the same lenses that I would on the first camera body. Will I ever go back to full frame sensors? Who knows? I have not felt the need for at least over a year and my luggage is much lighter when I travel.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    No money involved but I would rather donate my time to this than a faux-workshop dealer weekend where you get to play with gear and chew the fat with a tech-head.
    So I take it that you don't much like dealers.....Ah!!! I've finally figured out what your signature line means! -

    Dealers do not email me asking to buy your products.

    This statement always puzzled me. I wondered - why are you telling me what dealers don't currently do, as it would be outlandish to be expecting them to do it in the first place? I mean, why would dealers email you, asking to buy my products? I don't sell any products, I don't use you as some sort of sales middleman, and why would dealers - who are better known for selling than for buying - want to buy my products anyway? Why would the dealers not come directly to me, seeking these products, that I don't in fact sell?

    Now I realise that this is what you mean:

    Dealers, do not email me asking to buy your products.

    One little comma. A bewildering statement becomes a clear instruction. It's the miracle of punctuation.

    Ray
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    In short:
    I don't have 'a dealer' just 3 shops in london I have accounts with that I buy stuff from, all are very good and not pushy.

    A dealer emailed me direct after seeing my posts on here wanting me to buy their product that I had no need/use for. I didn't appreciate their spam email.

    My spelling/punctuation is poor. Luckily I make images for a living not write technical manuals.
    never trust the opinion of anyone who lists a load of gear in their forum signature. Dealers do not email me asking to buy your products.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    In short:
    I don't have 'a dealer' just 3 shops in london I have accounts with that I buy stuff from, all are very good and not pushy.

    A dealer emailed me direct after seeing my posts on here wanting me to buy their product that I had no need/use for. I didn't appreciate their spam email.

    My spelling/punctuation is poor. Luckily I make images for a living not write technical manuals.
    from my european perspective the mf dealer as buddy seems to be a US specialty. but maybe this kind of close relation is needed in
    a photography field where facts are ignored but fairytales of magic and wonders are exchanged in an strange mix of business interests
    and pseudo religion.
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    from my european perspective the mf dealer as buddy seems to be a US specialty. but maybe this kind of close relation is needed in
    a photography field where facts are ignored but fairytales of magic and wonders are exchanged in an strange mix of business interests
    and pseudo religion.
    You forgot the special robes and titles (based, of course on the MP of the back you have) for the fortnightly ceremonies.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    from my european perspective the mf dealer as buddy seems to be a US specialty. but maybe this kind of close relation is needed in
    a photography field where facts are ignored but fairytales of magic and wonders are exchanged in an strange mix of business interests
    and pseudo religion.

    from my texas perspective you sound a lot like Donald Drumpf.

    Someone who makes bewildering statements just to get a bit of attention.

    Well you got mine.

    I absolutely love that line “Where facts are ignored but fairytales of magic and wonders are exchanged”. Sounds absolutely Daliesque.

    I would like to think that people visit this great photography forum to improve their photography skills or share an inspirational tip to help other photographers tighten up their craft. It really doesn’t matter if you have a relationship with a mf dealer, sleep with an art director or have the keys to the Tate modern. What is important is that you are happy with the images you produce.

    No one has anything to prove to you. If you woke up feeling a bit lonely and with the need to poke someone, I can hook you up with a New Orleans Voodoo doll dealer.

    In meantime thanks for putting a smile on my face. Be well and take some great photos today.


    Last edited by Jeffery Salter; 25th April 2016 at 09:59. Reason: added complete quote from CSP
    Jeffery Salter
    www.jefferysalter.com
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Seems to me the very basic fact is that MF offers a considerably larger sensor than ff 35mm; don't ignore that fact.
    What anyone chooses to make of that from either point of view is the subjective, non-factual part, and I see the compelling reason group as pseudo-religious ranters
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffery Salter View Post
    from my texas perspective you sound a lot like Donald Drumpf.

    Someone who makes bewildering statements just to get a bit of attention.
    I won't say anything about MF and magic, but I can confirm the statement about European dealers. The situation is markedly different between the US and Europe on that point, at least in the European countries I have experienced. I think that this has to do with the historical differences in tax status between professionals and amateurs in Europe vs. the USA.

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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by CSP View Post
    from my european perspective the mf dealer as buddy seems to be a US specialty. but maybe this kind of close relation is needed in
    a photography field where facts are ignored but fairytales of magic and wonders are exchanged in an strange mix of business interests
    and pseudo religion.
    Interesting comment.

    Perhaps some folks attend dealer outings for camaraderie as much as in-depth gear review ... in other words for fun. Nothing wrong with a bit of fun. Frankly, technical attributes could more easily be demonstrated in someone's back yard.

    I have no idea how things are done in EU, and it is obvious that you do not know how it is here in the US.

    I've had two strong, long term relationships with "resellers" of camera gear: A Hasselblad dealer for over 10 years, and a Leica dealer for over 20 years. These "professional friendships" have continued because their after purchase assistance and information has made my life easier.

    The Hasselblad dealer spent countless hours helping me achieve certain infrastructure goals, helped train me and others with specialty gear (like a multi-shot back), and even assisted in testing my current gear against a new entry and advised when he thought it not a necessary upgrade. He even came to my studio and helped calibrate/shim view lenses using my DB on a tech camera. Most of all, when I had any issue, he dealt directly with Hasselblad to get it resolved in a fast and efficient manner.

    My Leica dealer has helped me by understanding what I needed in my work and maneuvering the complex retail opportunities that are available from time-to-time which has saved me a ton of money. When any issue has come up, he smooths the path, even going directly to the President of Leica USA if it wasn't handled in a timely manner.

    As to "fairytales" of magic and wonders as a religion ... I suppose the digital age and resulting scientific/technical obsessions has given rise to such speculations and critical notions. If a photographer can't make a determination of what pleases their eye, solves certain requirements, meets creative needs ... then no dealer, tech assistant or specific piece of gear is going to answer it for them.

    MFD isn't a fairytale for me. I see what I visually need and prefer because it is my tastes to be satisfied, and I trust my own eyes more than anyone else's (if that is "magic", so be it), plus leaf-shutter lenses are a fact not a myth.

    Personally, I go to a dealer for technical assistance, business/financial considerations, and to try new technical solutions to things I may want to accomplish. I do not go to them for creative advice or aesthetic notions. I have other sources for that sort of thing.

    - Marc
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    Re: A switch: Phase One to Nikon.........

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    .................

    That said, just because it worked for this pro or my friend above, doesn't mean it will work out that way for every pro. And then, for the hobbyist/artist where net IQ, resolution, color and tonality may be the holy grails, there is no contest.

    What I find most interesting is what this brings up as as a discussion point: Historically (and I suspect presently) MFDB manufacturers have seen their prime customers as the working pros in commercial fashion, studio and advertising. Will this now morph toward the serious hobbyist/artist? I for one think probably so...
    Jack, that is probably the most reasoned and balanced post in this thread and on this forum for a long time, thank you.

    In this endless MF vs The Rest debate I've always seen a very polarized response. Mostly it is either a die-hard defense of one's gear or disdain for those 'foolish' enough to spend huge amounts on equipment that only delivers 'marginal' benefits.

    I believe Jack does have a point. From my (albeit limited) observation, I too find that a lot of the new adopters of MF are serious amateurs for whom money is not all that much of an issue. Some are looking for that extra edge in their images and some perhaps for that hitherto forbidden and magical MF experience. In my case it was a bit of both.

    On some of my landscape trips I found the amateurs toting MF cameras while the pros had given up on them and were now firmly into either DSLR or Mirrorless.

    With sensor-resolution and lens quality of non-MF gear increasing steadily, it is not surprising that pros are switching.

    For the amateur, if you are not into the aesthetics of MF, it becomes a very expensive hobby very soon.

    JMT.

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