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Thread: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

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    Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    The world has changed recently for me. A backpack of all things has finally become a part of my daily routine, or is it addiction?

    My neighbors and passing vehicles slow down to watch me huffing around the neighborhood with the loaded backpack, a sight that appears to be unique around here. I can only imagine what goes on in their heads when they see the Gitzo tripod attached to the backpack, reminiscent of elk hunters in the northern areas of this country.

    I am feeling a little paranoid.

    My world has changed. I am getting back to being fit, albeit slowly. But progress is progress. With a few issues common to the human condition, I still manage to enjoy the experience because I know when we go out to a photo location, the additional load of pushing a wheelchair and other necessities will be easier.

    However, Spring is not far off. I am getting organized with my gear and I still need some tips on what will make things easier and safer.

    Let's begin from the ground up... my present Merrell tactical low-rise shoes are not ideal by any means. I need something to wear that breathes and is wide enough up front.

    Other tips? Tripod carry. The Satori handles the huge Gitzo fine, but there is room for improvement even after I get used to adding that extra 8-9 pounds.

    Exercises. How about a daily routine to make the carry better?

    Many thanks in advance from this new backpacking shooter.
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Keeping in mind, redundancy is your friend.

    I am also thinking of a medic bag (more than just a first aid kit)maybe one with molle attachment...
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."

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    Senior Member dchew's Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Dave,
    Are you talking about overnight backpacking, or more general hiking with a backpack that begins and ends in one day? The amount of non-photo gear is dramatically different. I assume the latter, since you mention pushing around the wheelchair.

    In regards to shoes, I've gone lighter and lighter as I've aged. unless there are crampons on my feet, I get as close to running shoes as possible given the weather, terrain and water. I'm done lifting 1.5 lbs of boots with each step 10,000 times a day! If you are talking about hiking around town and on light trails, then I would use trail running shoes. Gortex is ok for the occasional puddle, but I've tried both and frankly the jury is still out in my head on whether it makes a difference. Feet sweat a lot, and I'm not sure if all that moisture gets out through the membrane before it condenses and gets your feet wet anyway. I'm old school and still coat leather shoes with Sno-Seal. But light trail running shoes obviously aren't leather, so Gortex may make sense if you are going to often be out in wet weather. If you know it will be dry, I don't think Gortex is a good idea. These days my favorite socks are from these guys: darntough.com. In many ways I think socks are more important than the boots / shoes you pick.

    As for getting in shape, I am a big fan of finding a local hill and hiking up and down that hill a few hundred times. Steps work too, but your biggest risk of injury (besides sunburn!) is twisting an ankle when going down hill. Working out on an actual hill will strengthen those "other" muscles that don't get touched on a step machine. Start without a pack, then get the pack and add weight over time.

    There are a lot of prefabbed medical kits, but given your situation I would get a generic bag or molle attachment like you mentioned and build your own from scratch with materials that fit you and your wife's specific needs. Put dates on things. My wife has a medical kit she's been carrying around in her car for probably 30 years. I can't imagine what shape that gauze pad is in...

    Layer, layer and layer you clothes. Usually people get cold because they get wet. Layering allows you to regulate your temperature so you don't sweat, get wet, stop and then get cold. At least one of your layers should be windproof, and it should be the outer one. Keep a warm hat in the pack forever. I don't know if it is really true, but ever since I was a kid I was taught we lose 50% of our heat off our head. Cold hands? Put on a hat. Cold feet? put on a hat.

    That's a start!

    Dave
    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir

    davechewphotography.com
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Backpacks are one thing I donít get. Why is there still in 2019 no great hiking backpack. All the usual ones are ok, but certainly so much room for improvement, especially regarding hipbelt.

    Perhaps itís my problem as I have two arcteryx backpacks with their flexible disc system and itís 10times more comfortable. When I go back to my photo backpacks I feel like going back to the stone ages.

    Besides backpacks, I do love arcteryx jackets and stuff, they are freaking expensive, but last forever.
    Christopher Hauser
    http://www.chauser.eu
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    Senior Member dchew's Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Dave,
    If you are pushing a wheelchair, this won't apply: trekking poles really help. It took me a while to warm up to them, but they are a benefit even on flat terrain.

    Dave
    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir

    davechewphotography.com
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Whenever I'm not 100% sure about no precipitation I take along some rain protection.
    The options can be one or several of these:
    1. A poncho cover a lot including the backpack
    2. Backpack raincover. Lowepro has it included, but f-stop needs one, and there are generic on the market,
    so it doesn't need to be f-stop brand
    3. One or several dry sack's. The one's of waterproof ballistic nylon are extremely lightweight and can be used
    for cameras or lenses
    4. Lighteweight umbrella preferably photographer's with a clamp that can be used without handholding
    But the weather forecast may indicate that none of these are really needed
    Last edited by MartinN; 22nd January 2019 at 05:25. Reason: spelling
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dchew View Post
    <SNIP>
    If you know it will be dry, I don't think Gortex is a good idea. These days my favorite socks are from these guys: darntough.com. In many ways I think socks are more important than the boots / shoes you pick.
    <SNIP>
    Dave
    Two pieces of great advice. GoreTex [and other trade name equivalents] is excellent for certain conditions, and more suited in my view to particular garments [shells] or equipment [single-wall 4-season tents]. And socks [and sock fit and dynamics while you wear them] are, in some ways, more important, or at least as important, as the shoe/boot. Thanks for that link Dave Chew. I guess that makes it three pieces of great advice!
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    One thing I do that helps, is I wear ankle weights, about $12 on Amazon, while training.

    Joel

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by JoelM View Post
    One thing I do that helps, is I wear ankle weights, about $12 on Amazon, while training.

    Joel
    That is one of the worst things to do. If you want to exercise with additional weight put in on your body, eg, vest or backpack, or light weights in your hands. Your ligaments and tendons in your legs and feet are vulnerable to the excessive force from weight at the end of a lever, which is your leg.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
    Backpacks are one thing I donít get. Why is there still in 2019 no great hiking backpack. All the usual ones are ok, but certainly so much room for improvement, especially regarding hipbelt.

    Perhaps itís my problem as I have two arcteryx backpacks with their flexible disc system and itís 10times more comfortable. When I go back to my photo backpacks I feel like going back to the stone ages.

    Besides backpacks, I do love arcteryx jackets and stuff, they are freaking expensive, but last forever.
    I completely agree that photo backpacks seems like a compromise, though I I have to admit the Atlas Athlete is the most comfortable I have tried so far outside the Seek Outside Exposure or my all-time favorite, which is anything by Dan McHale. If you're serious about your backpacking, and there is any chance you might use it for more than just a day hike, check out this review of the Exposure. It's written by Jack Brauerówho might even be a member of this forum; if not, he ought to be; he knows his stuffóand while it's a tad dated, it's spot on. This is the only pack I have found that is a true backpacking/photo alternative to a custom pack.

    P.S. But don't get me started on Arcíteryx. I tried that pivoting hip belt stuff, and it just seemed completely gimmicky and uncomfortable for me. YMMV, of course, and zero personal offense is intended. One of my sons-in-law absolutely Arcíteryx gear, but except for one ultralight down jacket/liner, I have returned everything of theirs I have ever tried. And the seams are coming out of that jacket after less than 6 months. They've eagerly agreed to repair it, but I shouldn't have to.I would never tell anyone not to try an AT, because each of us is different in so many ways. But I would caution not to buy based on brand name alone. Whatever you buy, make sure you can return it. And truly try it out with 30 pounds or more of gear on your back.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dj may View Post
    That is one of the worst things to do. If you want to exercise with additional weight put in on your body, eg, vest or backpack, or light weights in your hands. Your ligaments and tendons in your legs and feet are vulnerable to the excessive force from weight at the end of a lever, which is your leg.
    I'm talking 1 to 3.5 pounds. There is no data suggesting that this is bad for you unless you have a preexisting condition. Start light and work up. Some shoes weigh 1 to 2 pounds more than running shoes so I wouldn't advise someone not to wear hiking boots because they will cause ligament damage.

    Joel

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Don't worry, I wonít be offended everyone has different taste and needs. I for one have hiked with so much stuff and different equipment that I can say what I prefer.

    When it comes to the actually quality of the stuff I canít say one negative thing. I own a lot of their stuff, but also lots of other company. My Omega SV jacket is now 8years old and still is like new. Best severe weather jacked I have owned.
    Christopher Hauser
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
    Don't worry, I wonít be offended everyone has different taste and needs. I for one have hiked with so much stuff and different equipment that I can say what I prefer.

    When it comes to the actually quality of the stuff I canít say one negative thing. I own a lot of their stuff, but also lots of other company. My Omega SV jacket is now 8years old and still is like new. Best severe weather jacked I have owned.
    Hope that it keeps on keeping you dry!

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dchew View Post
    Dave,
    Are you talking about overnight backpacking, or more general hiking with a backpack that begins and ends in one day? The amount of non-photo gear is dramatically different. I assume the latter, since you mention pushing around the wheelchair.

    In regards to shoes, I've gone lighter and lighter as I've aged. unless there are crampons on my feet, I get as close to running shoes as possible given the weather, terrain and water. I'm done lifting 1.5 lbs of boots with each step 10,000 times a day! If you are talking about hiking around town and on light trails, then I would use trail running shoes. Gortex is ok for the occasional puddle, but I've tried both and frankly the jury is still out in my head on whether it makes a difference. Feet sweat a lot, and I'm not sure if all that moisture gets out through the membrane before it condenses and gets your feet wet anyway. I'm old school and still coat leather shoes with Sno-Seal. But light trail running shoes obviously aren't leather, so Gortex may make sense if you are going to often be out in wet weather. If you know it will be dry, I don't think Gortex is a good idea. These days my favorite socks are from these guys: darntough.com. In many ways I think socks are more important than the boots / shoes you pick.

    As for getting in shape, I am a big fan of finding a local hill and hiking up and down that hill a few hundred times. Steps work too, but your biggest risk of injury (besides sunburn!) is twisting an ankle when going down hill. Working out on an actual hill will strengthen those "other" muscles that don't get touched on a step machine. Start without a pack, then get the pack and add weight over time.

    There are a lot of prefabbed medical kits, but given your situation I would get a generic bag or molle attachment like you mentioned and build your own from scratch with materials that fit you and your wife's specific needs. Put dates on things. My wife has a medical kit she's been carrying around in her car for probably 30 years. I can't imagine what shape that gauze pad is in...

    Layer, layer and layer you clothes. Usually people get cold because they get wet. Layering allows you to regulate your temperature so you don't sweat, get wet, stop and then get cold. At least one of your layers should be windproof, and it should be the outer one. Keep a warm hat in the pack forever. I don't know if it is really true, but ever since I was a kid I was taught we lose 50% of our heat off our head. Cold hands? Put on a hat. Cold feet? put on a hat.

    That's a start!

    Dave
    Wow, thanks, Dave! There is a lot of information in your post.

    With my direction changing/expanding, there is still no plan for overnight hikes even though we hope to be shooting nighttime sessions as I delve deeper into Astro P work. Good thing too, my loaded pack is about where I would like to max out weight-wise. Adding a tent, sleeping bag, etc. is not going to happen any time soon. If it does, I will be riding a bagger instead of hiking, LOL...

    At the moment, I am kind of ready and set for the occasional short hikes for skylines, waterfalls, and on-location shoots. But there are a lot of things including those you mentioned that I need to consider. I thank you for your thoughtful post, as always!

    I also need a really good backpack charger(s) for the iPhone and iPad. No idea which ones to look at. And there are the special needs like medicines, BP machine, clothing articles, snacks, water, and an alternative to the iPhone if in a remote area. I have heard of a portable satellite system but I have not researched that yet.

    The medic bag will be interesting to custom outfit. Maybe two bags, one on the pack and another on the wheelchair. Obviously there will be times and locations when my bride is not coming along so I will have some flexibility in my packing. But a good photographer's umbrella would be good regardless!
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    My favourite pack for hiking would be my F-Stop Anja. All the straps are snug and comfortable for me, even the waist strap. Only thing for me is the pack gets dirty because of the way you put it down and access from the inside. So I use the Wardrd Prvke for travel.

    Shoe wise, after my accident I hike in Salomon Speedcross 4s. They are trail running shoes and as such have super soft inners which really help me with my damaged leg, great knobs on the bottom for traction, and they have a gortex option. My tripod choice now is super light as well, a Benro GoTravel 2 with Arca Swiss L60.

    The key for me is to not take to much gear. I used to take everything, (pre-accident), and wondered why I didn't enjoy alpine hikes in Switzerland when we visit my wife's homeland. Dumbass you are carrying too much gear especially at 3000m altitude. Now 1 camera and at most 2 lenses, normally just 1, tripod, filters and that is it.

    I also wear Coolibar sun smart shirts. They are UPF50, and my Outdoor Research hiking pants are also UPF50. They both breath really well and are super comfortable to wear. I have a collection of great hats as well. As soon as I turned 50 I started getting BCC skin cancers so now I cover up. NZ sun is up there with the worst in the world.

    I often wear 2XU compression tights as well if I have done a lot of hiking and my legs are already pre-fatigued. The recovery ones are great as well after you have had a shower.
    David
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips



    This is what I use: an Osprey Farpoint 40 internal frame pack. It carries weight very well. I gave up using photo backpack some time ago.

    My lenses are in a Think Tank belt and pouch system (bottom of the main compartment). The belt comes out when I am shooting, but then can go into the bag in bad weather or when just moving quickly. While I have a rain cover, I also carry a garbage bag to stuff things in when in a downpour. The camera is in a padded insert at the top of the main compartment. (And make sure there is room for food, jackets, and other non-photo stuff)

    Usually, when I am shooting, the camera is mounted on the tripod and I simply carry that against my shoulder while extended. When collapsed, I put one tripod leg through where the strap meets the bottom of the bag. It is easy to get out if I need it without taking the pack off and it lets me walk.

    I find most people don't know how to wear a pack and adjust the straps to carry a pack comfortably. The weight of the pack should be on your hips, with the straps just holding the bag against your back. If the weight is distributed that way, carrying the pack is faily effortless.

    Multi-day or month trips are different, but that is another post...
    Will

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    I will open another can of worms: water - how much and how to carry? In Dave.gtís case, I think 1 liter is enough and use a water bottle.

    Before a hike I stand around and drink as much as I can, usually a liter over a period of 30 minutes to an hour. Then I am well hydrated at the start. I will carry 0.5 - 1 liter in the pack depending on length and conditions. I hate carrying water; itís sooo darn heavy.

    If I am going to be out multiple nights I will also bring a 2 liter bladder half full. That keeps it from being a big bulge in the pack. I still bring a std nalgene water bottle for convenience and for treating.

    As for treatment, that is the industry Iím in, and I am far too opinionated on that topic.

    Dave, in your case I wouldnít worry about treatment at all. You are out only one day and not too far from civilization. Hydrate before you start, drink what you have with you then just go thirsty. If you are worried about extra water for your wife, then bring a few chlorine pills in the med kit for emergencies. They weigh nothing and work against most things as long as you wait long enough. With chlorine, time is your friend. The one thing chlorine doesnít kill well is crypto, but your best chance of getting crypto is at the local pool. So, just donít go for a swim to cool off in the summer.

    Dave
    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Shashin View Post


    This is what I use: an Osprey Farpoint 40 internal frame pack. It carries weight very well. I gave up using photo backpack some time ago.

    My lenses are in a Think Tank belt and pouch system (bottom of the main compartment). The belt comes out when I am shooting, but then can go into the bag in bad weather or when just moving quickly. While I have a rain cover, I also carry a garbage bag to stuff things in when in a downpour. The camera is in a padded insert at the top of the main compartment. (And make sure there is room for food, jackets, and other non-photo stuff)

    Usually, when I am shooting, the camera is mounted on the tripod and I simply carry that against my shoulder while extended. When collapsed, I put one tripod leg through where the strap meets the bottom of the bag. It is easy to get out if I need it without taking the pack off and it lets me walk.

    I find most people don't know how to wear a pack and adjust the straps to carry a pack comfortably. The weight of the pack should be on your hips, with the straps just holding the bag against your back. If the weight is distributed that way, carrying the pack is faily effortless.

    Multi-day or month trips are different, but that is another post...
    Cool!

    Will,

    I love Osprey packs and the 55 looks really handy with the detachable day pack.
    Dave (GT)

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Water depends on two things. Duration and conditions. I normally hike in normal conditions (10c-30c) on normal hikes 4-8hours with 3L hydration bladder. To that I add 750ml of isotonic drink in a bottle. On longer hikes I'll add 1 of additional water. However, when I hiked in death valley for 7 hours I actually carried 8L of water. Same was in grand Canyon on a 14hour hike. It's a lot of weight but honestly, you are NOT ALLOWED to run out of water on a long hike.

    When it comes to shoes, it's a lot of training and depended on conditions. I prefer to hike 80% of everything in Salomon Speedcross Pro. Even when carrying heavy loads, I'm used to these shoes and don't need any more protection. However, when there is coarse gravel involved I get my real hiking boots which have more ankle protection.
    Christopher Hauser
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
    However, when I hiked in death valley for 7 hours I actually carried 8L of water. Same was in grand Canyon on a 14hour hike. It's a lot of weight but honestly, you are NOT ALLOWED to run out of water on a long hike.
    True! A few years back a guy died in Death Valley, he went on not so long of a hike from with half a liter of water.
    Same goes if you are driving in remote areas especially in the dessert. Every year people die because their vehicle breaks down far away from anything. Fill up your vehicle with gallons of water, never can have enough. And plenty of food as well, energy bars, nuts, trail mix etc.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Ha!

    Today, I realized something that I sometimes overlook. Exercise. While waiting for the Milky Way Season or even time to go out on location to shoot, I have found that putting the computer and iPhone away and simply walking with a loaded backpack is paying off in a big way.

    I feel better! My mind feels better! The backpack feels like it weighs 50% less! and only because I have been walking with the loaded pack 3-5 days each week.

    So, my tip of the day is just GET OUT and WALK with a loaded pack at every possible opportunity.
    Dave (GT)

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Christopher -

    Indeed, as an Arc'teryx enthusiast (I have a few Arrakis packs) as well I find most camera backpacks to be atrocious. I have talked with every manufacturer that will listen (Lowepro, F-Stop, Shimoda, Tenba, etc.) and none have really taken my advice to make a decent carrying photo backpack. One of these days maybe it will happen.

    Cheers, Michael

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
    Backpacks are one thing I donít get. Why is there still in 2019 no great hiking backpack. All the usual ones are ok, but certainly so much room for improvement, especially regarding hipbelt.

    Perhaps itís my problem as I have two arcteryx backpacks with their flexible disc system and itís 10times more comfortable. When I go back to my photo backpacks I feel like going back to the stone ages.

    Besides backpacks, I do love arcteryx jackets and stuff, they are freaking expensive, but last forever.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Great advice on this thread.

    My first action will be to pick up some good running shoes. Not sure about the cross-country "spiked" Salomon shoes, but I will need a new pair soon for everyday wear as well as accessing photo locations.

    After that, I'll consider the more traditional mid hiking boots. I can see where conditions would favor either at different times.

    Thsnks for all the recommendations. I look forward to more as time goes on.
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dave.gt View Post
    Great advice on this thread.

    My first action will be to pick up some good running shoes. Not sure about the cross-country "spiked" Salomon shoes, but I will need a new pair soon for everyday wear as well as accessing photo locations.

    After that, I'll consider the more traditional mid hiking boots. I can see where conditions would favor either at different times.

    Thsnks for all the recommendations. I look forward to more as time goes on.
    Dave,

    I know people who use trail running shoes for both running and hiking. Lightweight shoes/boots for hiking are much less tiring.

    I prefer lightweight boots for hiking and travel with my gear. I usually carry 15-20 kg in gear. I use Lowa Renegade boots without Goretex. I do not advise Goretex in footwear. Part of the reason I prefer boots is that they are warmer in cold weather and they are also fine for me in hot weather.

    Jesse
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Update!

    Another month has gone by and I actually look forward to my backpacking trek around the neighborhood, taking advice from several here, I switched to my old Nike shoes that I once reserved for walking/power walking and it has made all the difference. Wow! No hiking boots anytime soon, I will probably not need that level of foot protection this year, but maybe later.

    With the Satori, I could not be happier lugging the Hasselblad H system around. But that is the Studio kit and I am working on my own personal smaller kit and I am wondering if anyone here has used the Lotus pack? I think it might be the answer for the smaller kit, which is much less volume to carry and appropriate when all I want is to carry a DSLR, one lens, a few filters and accessories for a smaller project. The Medium Slope ICU should be large enough.

    For now, all I can say is that I love the inclusion of a loaded backpack on my daily walks. It is making quite a difference.
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by michaelclark View Post
    Christopher -

    Indeed, as an Arc'teryx enthusiast (I have a few Arrakis packs) as well I find most camera backpacks to be atrocious. I have talked with every manufacturer that will listen (Lowepro, F-Stop, Shimoda, Tenba, etc.) and none have really taken my advice to make a decent carrying photo backpack. One of these days maybe it will happen.

    Cheers, Michael

    www.michaelclarkphoto.com
    Michael,

    I have had some time to review your thoughts and look over your website. Thank you for both!!!

    Those images are powerful! Wow! I had no idea!!!

    Should I aspire to those activities? I think not, not at my age, LOL... but you inspire me and I wanted to let you know that.
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dave.gt View Post
    Update!

    Another month has gone by and I actually look forward to my backpacking trek around the neighborhood, taking advice from several here, I switched to my old Nike shoes that I once reserved for walking/power walking and it has made all the difference. Wow! No hiking boots anytime soon, I will probably not need that level of foot protection this year, but maybe later.

    With the Satori, I could not be happier lugging the Hasselblad H system around. But that is the Studio kit and I am working on my own personal smaller kit and I am wondering if anyone here has used the Lotus pack? I think it might be the answer for the smaller kit, which is much less volume to carry and appropriate when all I want is to carry a DSLR, one lens, a few filters and accessories for a smaller project. The Medium Slope ICU should be large enough.

    For now, all I can say is that I love the inclusion of a loaded backpack on my daily walks. It is making quite a difference.
    Hello Dave,

    Maybe I missed it somewhere in the thread, but I've not seen any mention of ThinkTank backpacks https://www.thinktankphoto.com/pages/backpacks

    To provide some reference on my comments, I'm 62 and been carrying photo gear in backpacks for over 40 years. For most of those years I used Lowe's b/c that's what was largely available and having been a climber in my pre 60's years, thought the climbing Lowe brothers did a nice job of thinking through the designs. While I found improvements over time and was (and can still be at times) really happy w/ the Whistler 450 https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/B...860972?sts=cat I found it too small or not shaped well for MF and tech cam gear. Its great for 35mm DSLR, lenses, accessories, extra clothing, and very bomb proof, but the depth doesn't accommodate tech cam bodies (Arca R, Factum, Universalis) unless they're placed flat, which then takes up too much space.

    This led me to a great Osprey pack, the Farpoint, b/c the straps tuck in and there's a side handle so depending upon the size its a tidy carryon. The "lid" is a full front zip to access the interior body so its open enough allowing me to put a big box Lowe insert I thieved from a roller bag, to place in good dividers all of the gear. There's still plenty of room for all the other stuff as well. It does cinch down well w/ its compression straps, but kept looking around for alternatives b/c I find it a bit cumbersome to unzip the lid to access the insert that I also unzip. Its not an elegant solution, but it carries well on the back, holds lots of gear and other stuff.

    This led me to look at ThinkTank models. My first TT purchase was actually a carry on roller bag b/c that's what I also needed and was using the Osprey alongside to check w/ clothes and then switched out my gear when on location. But b/c I was so impressed w/ the TT roller bag, started looking at their backpacks. I ended up getting the Firstlight 40L https://www.thinktankphoto.com/colle...firstlight-40l because; 1) its a carryon size, 2) its depth allows for tech cams, and 3) their dividers are super rigid/sturdy as is the overall body of the pack. I've found this sturdiness to be the case w/ their gear and why all of my other packs are now collecting dust. I've found their packs to be incredibly well designed, built, damage resistant, and very sturdy. I don't like sloppy packs. Not only do they need to hold the gear tightly and securely, especially Copal shutter lenses, they need to remain secure on your back when hiking, climbing, etc. Any left/right movements or sag cause one to adjust their body which will wear one out and potentially cause muscle issues. Our bodies are constantly seeking to be in balance and a sloppy pack makes that task a constant workout! I'm too old to fight that and there ain't enough Advil...

    I just returned from Patagonia w/ the TT w/ both the Arca R-Factum and Universalis, 2 Roden lenses, and IQ4, plus all of the needed accessories and tripod and the pack worked like a charm both on the flights and in the field.

    My general rules for packs are; 1) comfortable AND stable on my back, 2) rigid interior to keep each piece of equipment stabilized, 3) enough well thought out pockets, attachments, etc for accessories, BUT clean exterior to prevent snagging on limbs, rocks, etc. And durable...

    Hope this additional info helps

    Cheers,
    Robert

    PS: I always walk in hiking boots in the field b/c ankles need the support to maintain stability on uncertain terrain. And I also use 2 ski poles for further stabilization/balance and they really help the knees and hips on descents
    Website

    PhaseOne . Arca-Swiss . Mamiya . Hasselblad . Leica . Canon . iPhone
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    If you are ok with investing a bit in shoes, I have been really really happy with Scarpa hiking shoes and boots. I have not had the combination of durability, comfort and quality in any other shoes I have used. Hiking shoes and boots are pretty necessary here, as the terrain is mostly sharp lava rocks covered by varying amounts of grass or moss. Ankle support and strength in the soles makes a huge difference. About four years ago I got a pair of Scarpa Kinesis Pro Gortex hiking boots and they are exceptional...very very comfortable, great support, no rubbing, great lacing, waterproof. They were very expensive here, but I am so happy I invested in them. They are much better than the Vasque and Merrill boots I had before. Since then I have gotten some of their more casual shoes as well, and they are basically daily wear for me here.

    As for backpacks, the only one that I have used that I think is really good is the Photobackpacker setup. He is no longer selling them, but they were basically Kelty Redwings modified for holding camera gear. They are really big, so probably much too large for most day hikes, but when I have to carry my 8x10 or 4x5 somewhere, the advantage of having a true backpacking suspension system makes all the difference, not just in strain relief on your shoulders, but in stability...having everything locked down and stable is extremely important when you are climbing or descending steep slopes here. Unfortunately hiking in Iceland often means long flats followed by nearly vertical rocky slopes with lots of loose gravel and stones. Good shoes and packs make a huge difference...I dare say life and death difference in certain places (not so much for me, thankfully!).
    My photos are here: http://www.stuartrichardson.com Please have a look at my book!
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  29. #29
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    OK, as someone liking being outside and outdoor activity and photography as well here is my take on some things:
    1) I do like gear which is flexible. I choose my outdoor goretex jacket so that it does work for skiing, riding the bike, hiking and everyday use. I rather buy one really good peace of gear instead of 3 specialized ones. So I get a jacket wich is sturdy enough to carry a heavy backpack, where I can open the sides for ventilation for sports where you get warm, and which is not too wide so I can use it for bycicle as well, and in a color and look that I can wear it in the evening as well.
    Also Gortex and other tech equipment is far from being good for environment. So I think its better to buy few good pieces and use them as long as possible.
    2) I have started to really enjoy wool products. Merino Shirts, Wool in a second layer (swiss wool for example), and also loden jacket. It keeps you warm even if its a little wet, it doesnt smell, and it is a nature product.
    3) As suggested before I also like Scarpa shoes, but IMO the fit of shoes is a very personal thing (same for clothes), and just because Scarpa or Lowa works goof for me doesnt mean it needs to work good for others. Thats why I much prefer to go to a store and check things out instead of buying through the internet.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Thank for the kind words Dave!

    Cheers, Michael

    www.michaelclarkphoto.com


    Quote Originally Posted by dave.gt View Post
    Michael,

    I have had some time to review your thoughts and look over your website. Thank you for both!!!

    Those images are powerful! Wow! I had no idea!!!

    Should I aspire to those activities? I think not, not at my age, LOL... but you inspire me and I wanted to let you know that.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Some good pointers so far. Below is a photo of my gear in operation. It is pretty much the same in sub-freezing weather and hot weather; the difference is number of layers. I have lived in Alaska, now live in Switzerland, travel a lot and have spent a fair amount of time outdoors in many kinds of weather and terrain.

    Probably the most important factor is choosing good gear that is comfortable and fits well. A good piece of gear that fits poorly can cause a great deal of discomfort. Shoes that are only slightly uncomfortable can turn into a nightmare once a loaded pack is carried for a few hours. Likewise, a poorly fitting pack can be miserable after several hours. Shirts, trousers, under layers can cause chafing (I have done mountain ultramarathons and have a few stories about chafing).

    My gear.
    1. MOLLE pack, about 35L. I intentionally use a size that is airplane carry-on. I have larger packs, but mainly were used with monorail view cameras. On this day I had two cameras, three lenses, filters, rails, water, batteries, cards, etc. Total weight about 15kg, not including tripod. I have MOLLE pouches attached to the belt and pack, which can be changed according to needs. I also carried YakTraks, which are like snow chains for shoes. I used them shortly after this shot. The trekking poles are for when the terrain gets difficult or I want to go faster. Then, I attach the tripod to the bottom of the pack.
    2. Sun protection hat. Since the sun was intense, I stayed warm without a wool hat, but needed the sun protection. My hands were cold, but not too cold that I needed gloves.
    3. Wool scarf. This is very important for comfort. It is the first thing that comes off when I start getting too warm.
    4. Hooded shell jacket, with permeable membrane. This is a Columbia 3-in-1, which allows one to zip in different layers, if desired. In the pockets I have gloves, balaclava and Icelandic wool hat. On this day I had two shirts and Icelandic wool sweater underneath. I have had up to five layers underneath in colder weather. In colder weather I also carry mittens and mitten shells.
    5. Fjšllršven Geb trousers. I wear these in all weather. Flexible, large pockets, with long ventilation zippers. In colder weather, long underwear underneath and even colder, rain trousers or snowboard trousers on top (only used once). Even in hot weather I wear long sleeves and long trousers for sun protection. Occasionally, I wear shorts in very hot weather.
    6. Lowa Renegade boots. I prefer lightweight shoes. As mentioned before I know people who only use trail-running shoes to minimize the weight on their feet. I lace the boots for flexibility in the ankles. This is done with the top three lacing hooks at the ankle. Most people lace sequentially bottom to top. I lace bottom, top, then middle. I also have overboots for very cold and wet, but I have never used them.

    I use this gear for city shoots as well. It gets cold standing around waiting for the right light for an architectural shot.

    Jesse

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    This is quite an interesting thread. I also think it is funny how differently the situation can be felt depending on activity level. I do a lot of night work, and if you are standing still waiting for exposures you need much more insulation than you do if you are hiking. Wind is also totally critical to how much clothing you need (even with a shell layer). I was out last night doing some video work and it was calm and clear, but negative 4 C. Not super cold, but cold enough to be very hard on exposed hands. Going through the stuff I was wearing from head to toe:
    Short sleeve wool t-shirt, fjallraven fleece hoodie, wool long underwear, wool socks, insulated EMS canvas pants (basically for construction workers...kind of like carhartt with primaloft insulation), a patagonia ultralight down vest, fjallraven large down jacket, wool hat with both hoods over it, smartwool liner gloves covered by heavy mittens and insulated merrill winter boots. It sounds like a lot because it was! I look like the Michelin Man. But I can also stand comfortable outside for hours. The least successful part is the gloves...the liner gloves are not warm enough and now have holes in them, and the touch screen function does not work well (my monitor has a touch screen), and the mittens are useless for controlling the cameras. I have heard of a company that does good photography gloves from Norway, but the name escapes me right now. I will certainly have a look at their stuff, but I find that for me gloves are quite hard to get a good fit with.

    P.S. Here is a snap of my tripod...I realized when I put it in my car that it had built up a nice layer for frost...must have been my breath!

    Click image for larger version. 

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  33. #33
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Richardson View Post
    This is quite an interesting thread. I also think it is funny how differently the situation can be felt depending on activity level. I do a lot of night work, and if you are standing still waiting for exposures you need much more insulation than you do if you are hiking. Wind is also totally critical to how much clothing you need (even with a shell layer). I was out last night doing some video work and it was calm and clear, but negative 4 C. Not super cold, but cold enough to be very hard on exposed hands. Going through the stuff I was wearing from head to toe:
    Short sleeve wool t-shirt, fjallraven fleece hoodie, wool long underwear, wool socks, insulated EMS canvas pants (basically for construction workers...kind of like carhartt with primaloft insulation), a patagonia ultralight down vest, fjallraven large down jacket, wool hat with both hoods over it, smartwool liner gloves covered by heavy mittens and insulated merrill winter boots. It sounds like a lot because it was! I look like the Michelin Man. But I can also stand comfortable outside for hours. The least successful part is the gloves...the liner gloves are not warm enough and now have holes in them, and the touch screen function does not work well (my monitor has a touch screen), and the mittens are useless for controlling the cameras. I have heard of a company that does good photography gloves from Norway, but the name escapes me right now. I will certainly have a look at their stuff, but I find that for me gloves are quite hard to get a good fit with.

    P.S. Here is a snap of my tripod...I realized when I put it in my car that it had built up a nice layer for frost...must have been my breath!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Jesse, Stuart, thanks for sharing your detailed descriptions. You both have backpacking down to an art!

    While existing in a completely different universe, I have no aspirations of adventure or even snowy environments so it is with great interest and marvel that I read about your preparations and experiences!!!

    My simple daily walks with a loaded pack have become ingrained in my thoughts, regardless of the weather. I keep looking at organizational alternatives, accessories and, yes, appropriate shoes and apparel. You guys are very helpful in discussing what you have found that works. This whole backpacking thing has become more than I ever realized it could be. It is actually pleasurable, dare I say "fun"?

    Is it possible to become "addicted" to backpacking?
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."
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  34. #34
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    The backpacking issue - there are a few examples discussed below. The differences come from living with them, and there are no easy answers.

    Favorite pack is the Fstop Loka - extremely comfortable, back opening, well made and thought through. Everything seems in just the right place, easy to use. If you don't fill it too much, its an easy carryon for smaller European flights - and you can always get more in it. Now made as the Lotus, a bit lighter weight, thinner materials, not quite as lovely, but still good.

    A good smaller pack hasn't been found, but not for lack of trying. F-stop's Guru UL shrinks their successful formula, and the size is good, but its not got the same comfort. The opening panel to the ICU is smaller, and with MFDB gear, its hard to get more than just the camera out. That other lens is awfully cumbersome to access.

    Mindshift has the rotating pack, but the big version is too big, and the rotating pack in the small one might hold the camera, lens and back (if not too big), but where is the rest of the gear? Nice idea, but nope.

    Thinktank Streetwalker v.2.0 is reasonably well made (their Retrospective bags are great for carryon), a straightforward smaller pack, great for day hikes. It hasn't the comfort of the F-stop Loka, is easier to use than the Guru, and if setup right, comfortable enough. It works, but the second lens isn't any easier to handle than the Guru - easier to get out, no where really to put it. The pack goes on the ground and then you think about the F-stop instead. While it works, it doesn't quite charm like the Loka.

    So there are the choices: a smaller straightforward backpack that works well enough, but isn't satisfying, the Guru that isn't so easy and isn't quite comfy, but maybe the right size, or the larger more comfortable Loka? Gee, can't someone solve a "smaller backpack"?

  35. #35
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    A new to me, Loka UL now contains the much smaller, lighter Nikon kit, solving my problems with two different systems. The Nikon is now my personal camera and had replaced a half dozen other "vintage" cameras that I have used for years. The old cameras are gone and the new Nikon with two lenses now will suffice for awhile. The Loka pack was a godsend (thanks Dave!) because I now have a smaller volume of gear that fits just right in the smaller pack. Total weight is only 10-11 pounds and it is a great companion to the larger Satori.

    The Satori, fully loaded is around 30 lbs.because the Studio's H camera gear is much bigger and heavier! Perfect setup for commercial work. I love that pack!

    You will find me huffing around my neighborhood most days of the week with one or the other. After almost five months, I can attest to the health benefits of even a limited amount of time walking regularly with a loaded pack.

    Btw, the Milky Way Season is just around the corner! Time to find dark skies!
    Dave (GT)

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  36. #36
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Device charging!

    What are you guys doing about being away for an extended time and charging your phone/computer/camera batteries, etc.???

    For the longest time I have wanted to make my Billingham Pro Hadley into ... a charging station, if you will. Not that I expect to be hiking and camping overnight anytime soon, or on a week's long motorcycle tour, but I do expect to be spending an inordinate amount of time in hospital this year and it can be nearly impossible to simply charge a phone at times.

    And then there are the photo excursions I hope to make with my backpack and those could involve long days away from the home wall outlet. So, instead of a water bladder and hydrating tube sticking through the H2O flap on the F-stop backpack, I would like to make it the charging portal.

    What portable chargers are recommended?

    Btw, I really need a Molle phone case so I don't have to carry my iphone5 in my pocket. Any ideas on that would be appreciated.
    Dave (GT)

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  37. #37
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Dave,
    In the context of backpacking, I've found it difficult to justify carrying around (and buying) charging devices vs. just extra batteries. Four extra DB batteries weigh ~400 gms. Tough to beat that. Plus, when backpacking you usually are not in a situation like fashion or portrait where you are taking hundreds of photos in a short period, burning through batteries. I suggest taking a mophie or Jackery battery cell for generic equipment charging like a cell phone and leave it at that.

    I suppose if you are interested in video, that may change things.

    Dave
    Last edited by dchew; 21st March 2019 at 05:09.
    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir

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  38. #38
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    One thing this thread hasn't touched on is reading material. My go-to bible for the last ~ 40 years has always been Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills. Some chapters may not be relevant to the masses, but there is a wealth of information on necessary learning at the beginning and end of the book even if you never tie into a rope. It is now on its 9th edition, which I just purchased. That makes four editions on my shelf, starting with #4 (my brother has the well-worn 3rd edition).

    Dave

    Last edited by dchew; 21st March 2019 at 09:00.
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  39. #39
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dave.gt View Post
    Device charging!

    What are you guys doing about being away for an extended time and charging your phone/computer/camera batteries, etc.???

    For the longest time I have wanted to make my Billingham Pro Hadley into ... a charging station, if you will. Not that I expect to be hiking and camping overnight anytime soon, or on a week's long motorcycle tour, but I do expect to be spending an inordinate amount of time in hospital this year and it can be nearly impossible to simply charge a phone at times.

    And then there are the photo excursions I hope to make with my backpack and those could involve long days away from the home wall outlet. So, instead of a water bladder and hydrating tube sticking through the H2O flap on the F-stop backpack, I would like to make it the charging portal.

    What portable chargers are recommended?

    Btw, I really need a Molle phone case so I don't have to carry my iphone5 in my pocket. Any ideas on that would be appreciated.
    Great thread BTW.

    Well a charger for charging what?

    iphone for apps? Camera batteries? If you use a Nitecore charger for camera batteries then you can use the USB plug and plug that into say a MyCharge USB socket for charging camera batteries or plug the MyCharge lightening plug directly into an iPhone or the other plug into an Android phone. Sure it weighs a bit, but I consider it a dual purpose device. To charge the MyCharge it has US prongs that flip out for easy wall charging once you get to a restaurant, etc. or real sleeping place -a hotel.

    Just my 2 cents.
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  40. #40
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Of course, if you're truly hiking around during the day there is the option of a solar charger that you can just fix to the back of your pack.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    The World is a book, and those that do not travel read only one page ...
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  41. #41
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dchew View Post
    Dave,
    In the context of backpacking, I've found it difficult to justify carrying around (and buying) charging devices vs. just extra batteries. Four extra DB batteries weigh ~400 gms. Tough to beat that. Plus, when backpacking you usually are not in a situation like fashion or portrait where you are taking hundreds of photos in a short period, burning through batteries. I suggest taking a mophie or Jackery battery cell for generic equipment charging like a cell phone and leave it at that.

    I suppose if you are interested in video, that may change things.

    Dave
    This is my experience as well...though I am generally not going all that far. I often bring a ton of gear in my car (it is a problem, honestly...), but when I am actually out walking I keep it minimal...sometimes very minimal. I went for a short hike yesterday and only brought the Mamiya 7II with an 80mm and two extra rolls of film. Of course I also go without a camera too. If you are going overnight or know that you are going to need X numbers of batteries because of specific needs, then I would say bring extra batteries. I think it is also good to remember that usually we are doing this for enjoyment of being in nature...in that case I find it often nicer to focus less on getting every possible shot than on being a bit more open to rolling with whatever circumstances are being thrown at me. If that is an unexpected beautiful thing I come upon, or a dead battery telling me that I should be paying more attention to the camera in my head than the one in my hands.

    As for practical answers, I can't help too much...I have not felt much need for chargers on the trail. That said, I have used the USB charging accessory for the Lupine headlamps that I use, and that works brilliantly for the phone if you are caught out, and I am sure it would work just as well to charge a battery...depending on the relative size of both etc.
    My photos are here: http://www.stuartrichardson.com Please have a look at my book!
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  42. #42
    Senior Member dchew's Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Richardson View Post
    This is my experience as well...though I am generally not going all that far. I often bring a ton of gear in my car (it is a problem, honestly...), but when I am actually out walking I keep it minimal...sometimes very minimal. I went for a short hike yesterday and only brought the Mamiya 7II with an 80mm and two extra rolls of film. Of course I also go without a camera too. If you are going overnight or know that you are going to need X numbers of batteries because of specific needs, then I would say bring extra batteries. I think it is also good to remember that usually we are doing this for enjoyment of being in nature...in that case I find it often nicer to focus less on getting every possible shot than on being a bit more open to rolling with whatever circumstances are being thrown at me. If that is an unexpected beautiful thing I come upon, or a dead battery telling me that I should be paying more attention to the camera in my head than the one in my hands.
    This is exactly how I look at it too. I mentioned above doing video might make a difference, but I think algrove's point is better: A charger for charging what? If you rely on a bunch of different devices that need batteries, then field charging makes more sense. I'm carrying five devices that need batteries when backpacking at least one night:
    UV water sterilizer
    SPOT emergency tracker
    Camera
    iPhone
    Headlamp

    The iPhone is pretty much along for the ride in case I get back to the car and lost my keys, so I don't need to recharge it; it is generally turned off. The UV, headlamp and SPOT have standard batteries, and I don't take spares since I could deal with any of them dying while I'm out. It is really only the camera I care about. I'm a died-in-the-wool map person and don't even own a stand-alone gps.

    However, if you want to read by iPad or Kindle, use a gps, rely on your iPhone, shoot video, shoot stills, do light painting, etc, then a solar charger makes sense because it stands in for a bunch of batteries associated with all those devices.

    Dave
    Last edited by dchew; 22nd March 2019 at 08:24.
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  43. #43
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Today, in the Southeast, we are finally able to breathe a little without the yellow-green pollen dust storms, thanks to a little welcomed rain early this morning.

    I am looking forward to walking with the backpack... the 30-40lb Satori has become my friend 4-5 days a week and the 10-12 lb. loaded Loka is a joy to use the rest of the week!

    There is a downside, though.

    Just like when I was walking 5 miles and biking 30 miles a day ten years ago (a lot for me), I feel addicted to "exercise backpacking"! It is a fear that if I don't do it, something bad will happen. Lol, I think this feeling is more normal than others will admit... I hope anyway.

    As soon as pollen season ends, we will head out for a day trip to Western North Carolina, chasing waterfalls and re-visiting Appalachia.

    What is everyone else doing this Spring?

    How are you preparing?
    Dave (GT)

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dchew View Post
    One thing this thread hasn't touched on is reading material. My go-to bible for the last ~ 40 years has always been Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills. Some chapters may not be relevant to the masses, but there is a wealth of information on necessary learning at the beginning and end of the book even if you never tie into a rope. It is now on its 9th edition, which I just purchased. That makes four editions on my shelf, starting with #4 (my brother has the well-worn 3rd edition).

    Dave

    The fourth edition of Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills is still sitting on my bookself. I never felt I had to update it.
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Here are some other insights into wilderness photography. The first you may want to skip if you are afraid of heights. It is also a series of pages which you can access through left and right arrows on the page.

    https://alpineexposures.com/phototip...ch-camera-gear

    https://www.davemorrowphotography.co...ing-essentials

    https://www.mountainphotographer.com...kpacking-gear/

    https://garyluhm.net/backpacking-pho...htweight-gear/

    https://www.alexnail.com/blog/articl...era-equipment/

    And for a disciplined approach (note the date): http://www.backpackingnorth.com/blog...ht-photography

    You will not how important spreadsheet software is for these folks. If you pay attention to the ounces, the pounds will take care of themselves. I actually moved to a Fuji APS-C system (X Pro2) for the weight it saved me (my spreadsheet tells me a three lens setup is 35%-40% lighter than an M10 or Sony equivalent). But the concept of ultralight is genius: the cost of the best equipment does not only lighten your pack, but also your wallet (a twofer). But when you start thinking about foregoing underwear and pulling fillings, you have probably crossed a line.

    Although...
    Will

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Small iPhone case for backpack, with Molle attachment needed!

    Somehow I haven't found the right case for my iPhone. Carrying in my pocket does not work. Nor does putting it in the backpack or in a stretch pocket on the side.

    I need one that will attach to the shoulder of hip straps. For ease of access and use.

    Anyone have a good solution?
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."

  47. #47
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by dave.gt View Post
    Small iPhone case for backpack, with Molle attachment needed!

    Somehow I haven't found the right case for my iPhone. Carrying in my pocket does not work. Nor does putting it in the backpack or in a stretch pocket on the side.

    I need one that will attach to the shoulder of hip straps. For ease of access and use.

    Anyone have a good solution?
    Mindshift perhaps.

  48. #48
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    Quote Originally Posted by algrove View Post
    Mindshift perhaps.
    Thanks, they have lots of good stuff for sure... but no phone case.

    This one might be perfect...

    https://www.amazon.com/Urvoix-Black-...A8K5AHATZ4YXGA
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."

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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    "Phone case" dimensions are all very different so smallish cases might work for your phone with space to spare. It does not have to say phone case to be small and hold a phone.

  50. #50
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    Re: Backpacking Experiences and Tips

    With all the help in so many ways from you guys in this forum, I would like to thank you once again and update my solitary experiences so far. With a short window of time to do that, I will share over multiple posts and for now, let you in on a challenge that I set for myself last year and yesterday, I successfully completed it.

    With the surprise gift of a pre-owned Satori backpack many months ago from another forum member, I was introduced to the world of backpacking. I had never tried one on let alone use one for any purpose whatsoever. It was like opening a door to to a place where I was in control of something, but I didn't know what. So, with your help, hours of research, daydreaming, and photo excursions with my friend, tcdeveau, I began the backpacking experience. It was strange at first and completely foreign to me.

    However, I dedicated most days of the week for huffing around the neighborhood for short periods of time, with a loaded backpack (roughly 30# on average). The short walks were laughable to experienced backpackers, but my caregiving duties require my complete attention and presence except for very short intervals. The good news is the cumulative effect of regular exercise over time.

    My challenge was to work up to a fully loaded 40# pack plus a near 10# tripod; complete an excursion alone, in a local nature area; make a few long exposures with my new 10-stop ND filter; and return within an hour. Not much of a challenge, perhaps, but it was huge for me considering I have been house-bound for so many years.

    The entire trek was only a few miles through wooded areas, up and down hills and along ridges, and then a nice winding walk along Line Creek, to the rocky shoals where locals bring their kids on weekends to play in the water.

    To my surprise, I was the only human for miles around. It occurred to me that I might have made a strategic mistake, but I continued on in the 90į heat and oppressive humidity, something I had not experienced for decades, in another life, in another world.

    With my time restraints, I took residence in the rocks at the second location I selected, not worrying about composition so much as just getting some good captures and enjoying my freedom. I set up quickly and stopped to breathe, really breathe the air and, like a sponge, absorbed the sensory overload I was experiencing. It was glorious.

    Two camera systems, 12 captures total.

    Then it was time to leave. The walk back was, of course, uphill all the way...

    Sweating profusely, I could not help but smile when I returned to our old SUV, turned on the air conditioning and realized that I had completed my challenge, with 10 minutes to spare. The results of the images would surely be not so good as I forgot several key settings and made exposure mistakes, but I would find out later that I did ok, considering....

    c/o Studio INSPIRE!
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    Final result:

    I've got this.
    Last edited by dave.gt; 4th July 2019 at 04:56.
    Dave (GT)

    Best quote of the day: "Always be kind to others, behind every face is some kind of pain."
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