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Thread: Hasselblad X1D II review

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    Senior Member vieri's Avatar
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    Hasselblad X1D II review

    Ladies and gentlemen,

    for a little Sunday read, I just posted my first impression review of the Hasselblad X1D II. Without revealing too much, I think the camera is improved on pretty much all counts Read on to find out all about the changes and improvements brought by this new iteration of the great little X1D:

    https://www.vieribottazzini.com/2019...ii-review.html

    Looking forward to your thoughts and comments, best regards

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    Ladies and gentlemen,

    for a little Sunday read, I just posted my first impression review of the Hasselblad X1D II. Without revealing too much, I think the camera is improved on pretty much all counts Read on to find out all about the changes and improvements brought by this new iteration of the great little X1D:

    https://www.vieribottazzini.com/2019...ii-review.html

    Looking forward to your thoughts and comments, best regards

    Vieri
    Thank you for the very informative review of your demo X1DII, Vieri.

    For my part, I am happy that "Always start Live View in EVF" is still an option as I prefer it and miss it on other mirrorless cameras.

    Too bad about the counter being 'hidden' with long exposures. Maybe Hasselblad thinks it uses too much power when LCD is on all the time during the long exposure. I assume you could wake up the LCD to check the counter or finish exposure with a remote release. I prefer working with a delay instead of a remote release, but with mark 2, a remote may be more useful.

    Which dedicated GPS device do you use, and is it more precise than X1DII built-in GPS?

    Thanks,

    - Srdjan

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    Senior Member vieri's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by SrMphoto View Post
    Thank you for the very informative review of your demo X1DII, Vieri.

    For my part, I am happy that "Always start Live View in EVF" is still an option as I prefer it and miss it on other mirrorless cameras.

    Too bad about the counter being 'hidden' with long exposures. Maybe Hasselblad thinks it uses too much power when LCD is on all the time during the long exposure. I assume you could wake up the LCD to check the counter or finish exposure with a remote release. I prefer working with a delay instead of a remote release, but with mark 2, a remote may be more useful.

    Which dedicated GPS device do you use, and is it more precise than X1DII built-in GPS?

    Thanks,

    - Srdjan
    You are very welcome Srdjan, glad you enjoyed the read

    About the Long Exposure, the thing is that using a remote release in many instances is either simply not viable, or viable but a real pain. I.e.: 1. Camera in portrait mode on the tripod (possible with the RRS bracket, but a pain, you need to fiddle with the bracket, loosen it, slide the thing out, tighten it and do it again backwards when you are done); 2. Under rain / in sand storms / snow storms, and in all situations where you don't want to have your connector's door open; 3. Is another thing to carry / another thing that can go bad / another thing to fiddle with when you have gloves, frozen hands, when you are in precarious balance, on cliffs, in the water, etc etc. They just have to bring it back the way it was, it shouldn't be that hard

    For GPS, I lately use a Garmin watch, which I find great. I also have two classic Garmin GPS units, but they stay at home lately. And, I very rarely use GPS, I am ok with maps and can navigate pretty well pretty much everywhere with a paper map - which, has the added bonus of not running out of juice

    Best regards,

    Vieri
    Last edited by vieri; 4th August 2019 at 22:46.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    You are very welcome Srdjan, glad you enjoyed the read

    About the Long Exposure, the thing is that using a remote release in many instances is either simply not viable, or viable but a real pain. I.e.: 1. Camera in portrait mode on the tripod (possible with the RRS bracket, but a pain, you need to fiddle with the bracket, loosen it, slide the thing out, tighten it and do it again backwards when you are done); 2. Under rain / in sand storms / snow storms, and in all situations where you don't want to have your connector's door open; 3. Is another thing to carry / another thing that can go bad / another thing to fiddle with when you have gloves, frozen hands, when you are in precarious balance, on cliffs, in the water, etc etc. They just have to bring it back the way it was, it shouldn't be that hard

    For GPS, I lately use a Garmin watch, which I find great. I also have two classic Garmin GPS units, but they stay at home lately. And, I very rarely use GPS, I am ok with maps and can navigate pretty well pretty much everywhere with a paper map - which, has the added bonus of not running out of juice

    Best regards,

    Vieri
    Thank you for the answers, Vieri.
    Do you know if GPS sets the correct time on X1DII? It does not on X1D mark I, AFAIK.

    - Srdjan

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by SrMphoto View Post
    Thank you for the answers, Vieri.
    Do you know if GPS sets the correct time on X1DII? It does not on X1D mark I, AFAIK.

    - Srdjan
    You are welcome Srdjan. The GPS's time is correct GMT time. Not your local time though, I am afraid. Hope this helps, best regards

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Thanks for the review!
    The speed improvements and improved EVF are the things which would be benefits for me.
    I would love if they offered a black version of the camera because I also love my black x1d.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by Paratom View Post
    Thanks for the review!
    The speed improvements and improved EVF are the things which would be benefits for me.
    I would love if they offered a black version of the camera because I also love my black x1d.
    Hello Paratom,

    thank you for your comment, glad you enjoyed the review Who knows, there might be a black version in the cards, as a Special Edition perhaps (?). However, the new color scheme is just beautiful!

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Nice read, thanks for the review.

    What's the strap you are using? Looks very nice. Do they make a wrist strap?

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    Senior Member vieri's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Chong View Post
    Nice read, thanks for the review.

    What's the strap you are using? Looks very nice. Do they make a wrist strap?
    Thank you, glad you enjoyed the review! The straps are Harry Benz's, see here: https://www.vieribottazzini.com/2018...as-review.html, I now use the "Wingtips" version with the X1D. Yes, he does a wrist version of the Brogue I seem to recall. Hope this helps! Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    I like your rationale for getting X1D owner to upgrade. This is encouraging for us "no-budgeters" to get a used X1D at a good price

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    A most excellent review Vieri. Thanks much for your continued unselfish sharing of your time and expertise. And this just makes me wait for my backorder more eagerly. I found this understated gem delightful:

    one can’t help it but feel that Hasselblad didn’t include a charger because they intend to sell you the new, and very cool, dual charger instead.
    I suspect that, in this instance, one cannot also help but be correct.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by drunkenspyder View Post
    A most excellent review Vieri. Thanks much for your continued unselfish sharing of your time and expertise. And this just makes me wait for my backorder more eagerly. I found this understated gem delightful:


    I suspect that, in this instance, one cannot also help but be correct.
    The list of included items is displayed on page 10 of X1DII manual:
    "Battery Charger (included in some countries)"

    However, that "Battery Charger" may be just the USB power adapter.
    Last edited by SrMphoto; 5th August 2019 at 14:54.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by drunkenspyder View Post
    A most excellent review Vieri. Thanks much for your continued unselfish sharing of your time and expertise. And this just makes me wait for my backorder more eagerly. I found this understated gem delightful:


    I suspect that, in this instance, one cannot also help but be correct.
    Would definitely make sense Greg and Vieri. The new dual charger is awesome and has turned my old charger into a paper weight.
    -Todd
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by tcdeveau View Post
    Would definitely make sense Greg and Vieri. The new dual charger is awesome and has turned my old charger into a paper weight.
    -Todd
    I agree Todd. It's a very nice combo of form and function. I have no regrets about being suckered, er, seduced into purchasing it.
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    Senior Member vieri's Avatar
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by richardman View Post
    I like your rationale for getting X1D owner to upgrade. This is encouraging for us "no-budgeters" to get a used X1D at a good price
    Exactly, as long as people either stays in the system (if they are already in), or jump in (either with a X1D II or with a well cared fro, second hand X1D), the new price makes a lot of sense for all involved

    Quote Originally Posted by drunkenspyder View Post
    A most excellent review Vieri. Thanks much for your continued unselfish sharing of your time and expertise. And this just makes me wait for my backorder more eagerly. I found this understated gem delightful:

    I suspect that, in this instance, one cannot also help but be correct.
    My pleasure, I am glad you enjoyed the review and I am happy if my writings can contribute something to the collective knowledge.

    About the charger, there was a very famous Italian political, he used to say "thinking evil about someone is a sin, but you very often ended up being right"

    Quote Originally Posted by SrMphoto View Post
    The list of included items is displayed on page 10 of X1DII manual:
    "Battery Charger (included in some countries)"

    However, that "Battery Charger" may be just the USB power adapter.
    That would be my thoughts, too - but I am happy to be prove wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by tcdeveau View Post
    Would definitely make sense Greg and Vieri. The new dual charger is awesome and has turned my old charger into a paper weight.
    -Todd
    Quote Originally Posted by drunkenspyder View Post
    I agree Todd. It's a very nice combo of form and function. I have no regrets about being suckered, er, seduced into purchasing it.
    I totally agree, gentlemen. Not only the new charger is wonderfully built and looks extremely cool, it's small and feels indestructible and it allows you to charge two batteries, but what makes me love it even more is that it is USB-based. Less cables / adapters / bits and pieces to carry is always a definite bonus to me, as is the possibility of charging batteries in your car when traveling (for someone always on the road, that's truly a plus!). And, with the X1D II, if it should ever break for whatever reason, you can still charge your batteries in camera (and, again, you can also do so in the car).

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Vieri, what is your experience of the blackout time after each shot comparing the OG with the ii?

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    Exactly, as long as people either stays in the system (if they are already in), or jump in (either with a X1D II or with a well cared fro, second hand X1D), the new price makes a lot of sense for all involved
    Yes, that was my first reaction when I saw the pricing: encourages new folks and current users alike. Sure, it frustrated some earlier X1D adopters, and especially anyone who managed to buy new within the last few months [I was fortunate; I scored a smoking' deal on v.1 from a dealer who simply wanted to get his last new kit out of his inventory], or anyone who wanted to sell their v.1 for a better price. I understand that frustration, but overall it was a good move.

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    About the charger, there was a very famous Italian political, he used to say "thinking evil about someone is a sin, but you very often ended up being right"
    Just so.

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    I totally agree, gentlemen. Not only the new charger is wonderfully built and looks extremely cool, it's small and feels indestructible and it allows you to charge two batteries, but what makes me love it even more is that it is USB-based. Less cables / adapters / bits and pieces to carry is always a definite bonus to me, as is the possibility of charging batteries in your car when traveling (for someone always on the road, that's truly a plus!). And, with the X1D II, if it should ever break for whatever reason, you can still charge your batteries in camera (and, again, you can also do so in the car).

    Best regards,

    Vieri
    This is often overlooked. Being able to power through a single bus system is huge. If I could just get my Profoto and Phase battery charging over to USB . . ..

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by P. Chong View Post
    Vieri, what is your experience of the blackout time after each shot comparing the OG with the ii?
    There is no blackout once the shutter has done its job Image preview is much, much faster that in the original X1D, images show up actually before the last click of the shutter. Hope this helps!

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by drunkenspyder View Post
    ...

    This is often overlooked. Being able to power through a single bus system is huge. If I could just get my Profoto and Phase battery charging over to USB . . ..
    Indeed. Being able to bring all chargers to USB is amazing, and - as you perfectly put - overlooked Now, I finally got there: iPhone, iPad, MacBook, X1D II. All USB, perfect!

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Is the new Hasselblad X1DII still lacking a live Histogram?

    I've read through the available manual (online) and while there is mention of luminosity and RGB histograms, the manual suggests that they are available in review mode, since they are stored with the images. This was the case with the original X1D, and IMO was a major omission. And in this regard, I have yet to find a modern day camera that does not offer a live, histogram visible either in the LCD or EVF. OK, maybe there is one, but I haven't stumbled across it.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    Is the new Hasselblad X1DII still lacking a live Histogram?

    I've read through the available manual (online) and while there is mention of luminosity and RGB histograms, the manual suggests that they are available in review mode, since they are stored with the images. This was the case with the original X1D, and IMO was a major omission. And in this regard, I have yet to find a modern day camera that does not offer a live, histogram visible either in the LCD or EVF. OK, maybe there is one, but I haven't stumbled across it.
    Hello Ron,

    yes, at the moment that is still the case, as you can see in my review which I am linking again for you here: https://www.vieribottazzini.com/2019...ii-review.html, see the conclusions if you don't want to read it all. However, the camera I reviewed is a Demo unit, and firmware is very likely not final, so this can change. If we take the X1D as an example, Hasselblad has shown their commitment to constantly improving the camera via FW updates, and I hope this will continue to be the case with the X1D II. So, even if Live View histogram will not make it into the launch version of FW, I am hopeful it will make it into future updates.

    One more thing that makes me hopeful is that it has been said that, for the X1D, the absence of LV histogram was a hardware limitation. Many understood this to be a limitation of the sensor, mistakenly in my opinion since the GFX 50 had LV histogram with the same sensor. What it could have been instead is a limitation of the surrounding processors, something that should have been solved now with the new processors of the X1D II, so I am hopeful that we'll see LV histogram eventually.

    Let's wait and see. Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    Hello Ron,

    yes, at the moment that is still the case, as you can see in my review which I am linking again for you here: https://www.vieribottazzini.com/2019...ii-review.html, see the conclusions if you don't want to read it all. However, the camera I reviewed is a Demo unit, and firmware is very likely not final, so this can change. If we take the X1D as an example, Hasselblad has shown their commitment to constantly improving the camera via FW updates, and I hope this will continue to be the case with the X1D II. So, even if Live View histogram will not make it into the launch version of FW, I am hopeful it will make it into future updates.

    One more thing that makes me hopeful is that it has been said that, for the X1D, the absence of LV histogram was a hardware limitation. Many understood this to be a limitation of the sensor, mistakenly in my opinion since the GFX 50 had LV histogram with the same sensor. What it could have been instead is a limitation of the surrounding processors, something that should have been solved now with the new processors of the X1D II, so I am hopeful that we'll see LV histogram eventually.

    Let's wait and see. Best regards,

    Vieri
    Hi Vieri,
    Thank you for your reply.
    I guess we'll have to wait and see what develops, but I'd been disappointed by the X1D and suspect that the newest iteration will be, or is a tweaked version of the original—BTW, nice review of same. Rather than reinvest in the system, however, I have decided to move on and wait for a preordered Fuji GFX100.
    Best regards,
    Ron
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    Hi Vieri,
    Thank you for your reply.
    I guess we'll have to wait and see what develops, but I'd been disappointed by the X1D and suspect that the newest iteration will be, or is a tweaked version of the original—BTW, nice review of same. Rather than reinvest in the system, however, I have decided to move on and wait for a preordered Fuji GFX100.
    Best regards,
    Ron
    Hello Ron,

    you are welcome. The new X1D II, sensor aside, is a completely new camera IMHO, with new processors and electronics, new EVF and new LCD. Also IMHO, it's now better than the Fuji GFX 50R/S, if you like leaf-shutter-based cameras. If you prefer focal plane shutter, obviously, the Fuji GFX 50 is your best choice. The GFX 100, of course, is a completely different story, not only resolution-wise, but for all the tech that it contains and, if you need that, is without equal.

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    Hello Ron,

    you are welcome. The new X1D II, sensor aside, is a completely new camera IMHO, with new processors and electronics, new EVF and new LCD. Also IMHO, it's now better than the Fuji GFX 50R/S, if you like leaf-shutter-based cameras. If you prefer focal plane shutter, obviously, the Fuji GFX 50 is your best choice. The GFX 100, of course, is a completely different story, not only resolution-wise, but for all the tech that it contains and, if you need that, is without equal.

    Best regards,

    Vieri
    That, and someone smacked the GFX100 with an ugly stick! Held one at a camera shop a week or so ago - not much subtlety or elegance wasted on that camera ...
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikarus View Post
    That, and someone smacked the GFX100 with an ugly stick! Held one at a camera shop a week or so ago - not much subtlety or elegance wasted on that camera ...
    Perhaps, but beauty and elegance do not always bring home the bacon, and form doesn't always equate with function.

    I guess if you take away the 102mp sensor, the IBIS and the need for a heat dissipating enclosure to accommodate the pixel dense sensor, as well as all of its technological goodies, you could assemble a more attractive camera, but then we'd be sacrificing function for form. And cameras are designed for imaging, not beauty contests. When was the last time a client said, "Your camera is ugly?"
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    Hello Ron,

    you are welcome. The new X1D II, sensor aside, is a completely new camera IMHO, with new processors and electronics, new EVF and new LCD. Also IMHO, it's now better than the Fuji GFX 50R/S, if you like leaf-shutter-based cameras. If you prefer focal plane shutter, obviously, the Fuji GFX 50 is your best choice. The GFX 100, of course, is a completely different story, not only resolution-wise, but for all the tech that it contains and, if you need that, is without equal.

    Best regards,

    Vieri
    Ciao Vieri,
    Often times it's not a matter of need, but desire. I don't need 102mp, but I can no longer do without IBIS. In the past, a steady hand had been a requirement of my trade (physician) but tincture of time has taken its toll and the advent of IBIS has brought with it a breath of fresh air. I've been involved in photography both as a hobbyist and, for a brief interval professionally, for the past 60 years, and have owned more cameras than I can count. But this new stabilized breed is an eye opener, and I find that I can not do without IBIS ergo, the GFX100. I had owned a GFX50s and sold it due to its, IMO, odd ergonomics and the absence of stabilization. I have winnowed my collection of cameras down to a Panasonic S1R, G9, and Sony A7rIII ... all with IBIS.
    Tanti cari saluti,
    Ron
    BTW, parlo Italiano

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    Ciao Vieri,
    Often times it's not a matter of need, but desire. I don't need 102mp, but I can no longer do without IBIS. In the past, a steady hand had been a requirement of my trade (physician) but tincture of time has taken its toll and the advent of IBIS has brought with it a breath of fresh air. I've been involved in photography both as a hobbyist and, for a brief interval professionally, for the past 60 years, and have owned more cameras than I can count. But this new stabilized breed is an eye opener, and I find that I can not do without IBIS ergo, the GFX100. I had owned a GFX50s and sold it due to its, IMO, odd ergonomics and the absence of stabilization. I have winnowed my collection of cameras down to a Panasonic S1R, G9, and Sony A7rIII ... all with IBIS.
    Tanti cari saluti,
    Ron
    BTW, parlo Italiano
    Ciao Ron,

    I am sorry to hear that IBIS is now a requirement for you, and I am happy that the Fuji GFX 100 - despite is lack of beauty, as many pointed out - offer you a solution for that allowing you to keep using MF, besides FF, even now that your hands are less steady than what they used to be. Yours is a classic example of what I always say about choosing a camera: evaluate your requirements and needs, and choose accordingly. For me, photography is something that happens on a tripod 90% of the times, and when I am handholding a camera I much prefer to have something small, light and nimble. More, I hike long distance, so I much prefer a smaller and lighter solution. So, the GFX 100 is out, and the X1D is in. While of course I would welcome more resolution, I am more than happy with 50 MP for now, and I am in no rush for Hasselblad to release a X2D with a 100 MP sensor - it will happen eventually, and when it will, I will definitely evaluate it and consider it. And even assuming it won't happen, ever, I will keep using the X1D II for the foreseeable future unless something drastic happens in the market.

    Buona giornata e buon Agosto!

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by vieri View Post
    Ciao Ron,

    I am sorry to hear that IBIS is now a requirement for you, and I am happy that the Fuji GFX 100 - despite is lack of beauty, as many pointed out - offer you a solution for that allowing you to keep using MF, besides FF, even now that your hands are less steady than what they used to be. Yours is a classic example of what I always say about choosing a camera: evaluate your requirements and needs, and choose accordingly. For me, photography is something that happens on a tripod 90% of the times, and when I am handholding a camera I much prefer to have something small, light and nimble. More, I hike long distance, so I much prefer a smaller and lighter solution. So, the GFX 100 is out, and the X1D is in. While of course I would welcome more resolution, I am more than happy with 50 MP for now, and I am in no rush for Hasselblad to release a X2D with a 100 MP sensor - it will happen eventually, and when it will, I will definitely evaluate it and consider it. And even assuming it won't happen, ever, I will keep using the X1D II for the foreseeable future unless something drastic happens in the market.

    Buona giornata e buon Agosto!

    Vieri
    Ciao Vieri,

    Thank you for your thoughts.
    I agree, the GFX would not make a good hiking companion. As for tripod use, for my purposes it is relegated to the studio, as I cannot imagine lugging a reasonably sturdy tripod around town.
    In regards to a future, 100mp X1d, I would imagine that, given the physical and heat dissipation requirements, any future iteration of the camera would result in a significant alteration of its form. But in its current state, it is indeed an attractive option, just not a workable solution for my needs.
    Buona giornata

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    And cameras are designed for imaging, not beauty contests. When was the last time a client said, "Your camera is ugly?"
    Um, last week, when they called my Phase a “beast,” (I love the beast, but it is a cacophony of lines and angles), and the same person praised my X1D’s elegance. So, yeah, it may or may not affect the image, but the gratification a tool creates in one’s hands matters to me. Same with my cars (to some, Point A—>Point B is not an emotional experience; to me it is) and espresso machine (who wants to look at and put hands on “ugly” at 4:30am?).

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    Ciao Vieri,

    Thank you for your thoughts.
    I agree, the GFX would not make a good hiking companion. As for tripod use, for my purposes it is relegated to the studio, as I cannot imagine lugging a reasonably sturdy tripod around town.
    In regards to a future, 100mp X1d, I would imagine that, given the physical and heat dissipation requirements, any future iteration of the camera would result in a significant alteration of its form. But in its current state, it is indeed an attractive option, just not a workable solution for my needs.
    Buona giornata
    Ciao Ron,


    you are welcome, thank you for your reply.

    About a possible X2D with 100MP: sensor size is exactly the same, and as far as heat dissipation I am not sure it will need a different body. Technology evolves, see for instance the new X1D II vs X1D: same sensor, but the X1D II's new processors are much - MUCH - faster and yet the new camera doesn't get any warmer than the old one. So, I am pretty sure that - assuming that the 100 MP sensor gets warmer than the 50 MP one, which is not a given in the first place - it will be possible to use processors that keep the heat problem down to a reasonable body. If what I have heard from Hasselblad has to be believed, they have no intention of changing the X1D's body for future iteration, and in my opinion this could have been a very good reason for not having a 100 MP X2D yet. If you think about it, everything is there, sensor, processors, tech, etc etc. The only reason for not releasing a X2D with 100 MP is that the available technology doesn't allow for fitting everything in the X1D body - with a body change, they could have done it easily.

    I guess we'll just have to wait and see

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by drunkenspyder View Post
    Um, last week, when they called my Phase a “beast,” (I love the beast, but it is a cacophony of lines and angles), and the same person praised my X1D’s elegance. So, yeah, it may or may not affect the image, but the gratification a tool creates in one’s hands matters to me. Same with my cars (to some, Point A—>Point B is not an emotional experience; to me it is) and espresso machine (who wants to look at and put hands on “ugly” at 4:30am?).
    I definitely agree. If I'd have to choose between form and function, of course I'd choose function - I need my tools to work, first and foremost. But, the working experience, the feeling I have when I photograph, my relationship with my tools, all are also very important to me, and so is the UI. So, if the choice is between any of the GFX 50 and any of the X1D, I'll choose the X1D any day, no question about it. None. The X1D inspires me to pick it up and go to work, while the very idea of having to pick up the GFX 50 makes me lose any joy.

    That said, of course if I'd need something that is only available in a less visually inspiring camera, so to speak, such as i.e. 100 MP and IBIS, then I'd go for it. Luckily I don't need to do that

    Best regards,

    Vieri
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Excuse my blunt response, but when I picked up the GFX100 it felt about as ergonomic as a 1980’s microwave oven with a heavy lens glued on it. Files are beautiful and to some that’ll be all that counts. Indeed others might find it fits their hands well AND produces great files - as opposed to produces great images, which is solely up to the person behind the camera. Technology is not the limiting factor and hasn’t been for eons.

    And don’t get me started on the Fuji interface and menu structure. Even Sony could teach them a lesson or two about menu hierarchy and logic... Even Sony... (My personal opinions of course.)

    Anyway, at the end of the day people buy what suits and works for them. That’s all that matters. Judging by the amount of chopping and changing of gear of all sorts people do on here and other forums however, there may be no magic bullets...

    I’m going to load some more 8x10” film AKA set fire to my bank account. (That Fuji and Hasselblad are looking better by the minute!)
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    I know there are no magic bullets.

    I've been slowly trying and forming my 'ideal system' to my likes and needs. I'm pretty much done with my FF and smaller search, and am very happy with what I've acquired and use there. I've felt a need for a larger format for a while, and the step up from APS-C to FF just never played out to much advantage far as I could see, so I've settled on APS-C and now want the larger format to be 33x44 MFD.

    I looked at the Fuji cameras at the shop and was immediately turned off ... they have a lot of options, most of which I don't need and clutter up the camera more than I want. The X1D appealed to me even before they shipped it when I played with it at a demo event, and it's only gotten better since. The X1D II looks even better ... I haven't completely finished reading Vieri's review yet (I've been traveling since he posted it) but it all sounds just as I expected.

    But. Much as I like the X1D/II, the form factor of Hasselblad's other recent announcement (the 907x/CFV50c II) just appeals to me much more, and the way the CFV50c II can be used with my 500CM and then with my other lenses as well with the 907x body: It just make more sense for what I want out of this equipment.

    Time will tell, but I expect I'll be using that kit for a long time to come. I'm very glad I didn't sell the 500CM system a year or so back when I thought I might.

    G

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by tjv View Post
    Excuse my blunt response, but when I picked up the GFX100 it felt about as ergonomic as a 1980’s microwave oven with a heavy lens glued on it. Files are beautiful and to some that’ll be all that counts. Indeed others might find it fits their hands well AND produces great files - as opposed to produces great images, which is solely up to the person behind the camera. Technology is not the limiting factor and hasn’t been for eons.

    And don’t get me started on the Fuji interface and menu structure. Even Sony could teach them a lesson or two about menu hierarchy and logic... Even Sony... (My personal opinions of course.)

    Anyway, at the end of the day people buy what suits and works for them. That’s all that matters. Judging by the amount of chopping and changing of gear of all sorts people do on here and other forums however, there may be no magic bullets...

    I’m going to load some more 8x10” film AKA set fire to my bank account. (That Fuji and Hasselblad are looking better by the minute!)
    There have been many statements regarding the unsightly nature of the GFX100, as well as numerous Leica lovers claiming that the Leica SL is "beautiful." However, the appearance of the Leica SL with battery grip is not much different than that of the GFX.
    (I've tried to attach photos of both, but I an experiencing difficulty with same.)

    The GFX may still be larger but its appearance is not much different. As for the comments made by many, the absence of the characteristic Fuji top plate dials appears to be where the industry is headed, with an obvious eye towards cost containment. This trend is seen with the GFX100, the Leica SL and likely the SL2, as well as the X1DII. One can argue that a simplistic interface is a philosophical feature, but the nature of everything is ultimately determined by the money factor, and less dials and buttons boils down to cost containment. And if that approach pleases the buying public, so much the better.

    Do I think that the GFX100 is attractive? NO, but I didn't think that the Leica SL was a beauty either.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    For me it's function over form any day and for me the joy of using a tool comes from functioning well and not because it is "beautiful". Obviously it needs to fit in my hand well which is a very personal experience, with no "right" or "wrong" in a general sense.

    In my mind no cameras, and certainly not the MF ones, are "beautiful", they're mostly big, shaped like a brick or pavement tile and won't be mistaken for art like a pair of sunglasses left on a museum floor https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...staken-for-art

    Saying one is more beautiful vs. another is a valid personal opinion (beauty is in the eye of the beholder) but no more than that.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by pegelli View Post
    For me it's function over form any day and for me the joy of using a tool comes from functioning well and not because it is "beautiful". Obviously it needs to fit in my hand well which is a very personal experience, with no "right" or "wrong" in a general sense.

    In my mind no cameras, and certainly not the MF ones, are "beautiful", they're mostly big, shaped like a brick or pavement tile and won't be mistaken for art like a pair of sunglasses left on a museum floor https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...staken-for-art

    Saying one is more beautiful vs. another is a valid personal opinion (beauty is in the eye of the beholder) but no more than that.
    I agree in totality!

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    The GFX may still be larger but its appearance is not much different. As for the comments made by many, the absence of the characteristic Fuji top plate dials appears to be where the industry is headed, with an obvious eye towards cost containment. This trend is seen with the GFX100, the Leica SL and likely the SL2, as well as the X1DII. One can argue that a simplistic interface is a philosophical feature, but the nature of everything is ultimately determined by the money factor, and less dials and buttons boils down to cost containment. And if that approach pleases the buying public, so much the better.
    Unfortunately, a simplistic interface and relatively few buttons and dials in cameras apparently doesn't please the buying public at all, because the only camera manufacturers producing cameras that follow that design philosophy are made by Phase One, Hasselblad and Leica. Whatever their differences, they all share a similar design philosophy, and together, they make VERY few cameras. Almost all cameras are made by the Japanese, and they have an unrequited passion for dials, buttons, options, features, and deep menu systems that boggle the mind (or at least mine). Can you imagine what the iPhone and the Google Pixel would look like and how they would work if the Japanese designed them? This is a very different issue from the physical beauty of a camera. It's about how smooth and enjoyable the process of USING a camera is in practice.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Why is it necessary to denigrate another camera in order to justify buying one’s own?

    Camera X appeals to me. Full stop. There are cameras I wished that I liked, just how I wish I liked exercise.

    The rest confuses me.

    Best,

    Matt
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by hcubell View Post
    Unfortunately, a simplistic interface and relatively few buttons and dials in cameras apparently doesn't please the buying public at all, because the only camera manufacturers producing cameras that follow that design philosophy are made by Phase One, Hasselblad and Leica. Whatever their differences, they all share a similar design philosophy, and together, they make VERY few cameras. Almost all cameras are made by the Japanese, and they have an unrequited passion for dials, buttons, options, features, and deep menu systems that boggle the mind (or at least mine). Can you imagine what the iPhone and the Google Pixel would look like and how they would work if the Japanese designed them? This is a very different issue from the physical beauty of a camera. It's about how smooth and enjoyable the process of USING a camera is in practice.
    I don't follow this very well.
    I think it's good to have more buttons, menu options and levers than having less. But having more does not mean that we have to use them all. In a fully featured machinery we can always pre-set most of the parameters to a good default and operate only the two or three we need. This turns the complex device into a simple one. Doing the opposite is not possible.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by mristuccia View Post
    I don't follow this very well.
    I think it's good to have more buttons, menu options and levers than having less. But having more does not mean that we have to use them all. In a fully featured machinery we can always pre-set most of the parameters to a good default and operate only the two or three we need. This turns the complex device into a simple one. Doing the opposite is not possible.
    What's hard to follow? Some people like external controls. Some don't. There are lots of arguments for both sides, but it comes down to preference. If my camera does not "spark joy", as Marie Kando would say, it doesn't get used. Even if you use the "it's just a tool and get's the job done, who cares what it looks like" argument, that's still a reflection of your own values. And they are yours. And that's fine.

    My own experience handling the Fujis is that I liked the 100 much more in the hand than either of the 50's. It doesn't satisfy some of my other personal requirements (size and weight), so I didn't get it. But it satisfies many others. The X1D is a better match for Vieri than it is for me, but it's still the best compromise for me right now.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by MGrayson View Post
    What's hard to follow? Some people like external controls. Some don't. There are lots of arguments for both sides, but it comes down to preference. If my camera does not "spark joy", as Marie Kando would say, it doesn't get used. Even if you use the "it's just a tool and get's the job done, who cares what it looks like" argument, that's still a reflection of your own values. And they are yours. And that's fine.

    My own experience handling the Fujis is that I liked the 100 much more in the hand than either of the 50's. It doesn't satisfy some of my other personal requirements (size and weight), so I didn't get it. But it satisfies many others. The X1D is a better match for Vieri than it is for me, but it's still the best compromise for me right now.

    Matt
    I don't follow the idea that "a simplistic interface and relatively few buttons and dials" could be an evaluation criteria.
    For example, I like simplistic interfaces and few buttons as well, nonetheless I've chosen a Fujifilm X-T2 as my APS-C "reportage" camera, because of its weight, form-factor and output quality. I've navigated its hugely complex menu only one or two times, I've set up all the stuff that I need and now I use the camera almost as a point-and-shot one, by only changing ISO and aperture on a normal reportage or street-photography shooting.
    On the MF side I have a CFV-50c back which I use with my 503CW camera for "slow" art/conceptual photography. Again, I've chosen it because of its versatility and output quality, despite it has a very poor user interface and very few buttons and customisation options.
    In the end I operate both cameras in the same simplistic "zen" way. It's up to me how I use a system, however complex it may be.
    On the contrary, a simple system cannot be turned into a complex and fully featured one in case our future photography career would need it.
    Last edited by mristuccia; 14th August 2019 at 12:18.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by mristuccia View Post
    I don't follow this very well.
    I think it's good to have more buttons, menu options and levers than having less. But having more does not mean that we have to use them all. In a fully featured machinery we can always pre-set most of the parameters to a good default and operate only the two or three we need. This turns the complex device into a simple one. Doing the opposite is not possible.
    Yes, but first yo uhave to take much more time to understand all those buttons and menues and configure them. For my part I am allways impressed by products with an intuitive user interface.
    If I could choose I would have something with more buttons than Leica but with much less than Pana/Oly etc.
    I have not missed any buttons from the x1d, except a joystick for moving AF point.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    My “ugly stick” comment seems to have struck a nerve!

    The starting point has to be one of function. Form must follow function, to my mind. For others, not so much. What is the function I want in a camera? Aperture control, focus, shutter and ISO, roughly in that order. In that sense, the Leica M is the best iteration.

    With the addition of electronics - AF, aperture priority, white balance and everything else - that clarity of purpose gets confused. Lenses with multitudes of switches, bodies littered with buttons scattered all over the place ... my first digital camera had no obvious way of adjusting aperture.

    For the cost of these cameras, good design is relevant. Is the SL pretty? No. But it is the best camera I have used so far. Every button and user control is well considered and the menus nicely shallow. After years of use, I still haven’t used the manual.

    From what I’ve seen, the X1D will serve the same purpose.

    The Fuji? Having held one in my hand, I found it huge, poorly conceived (for what I want), massively expensive and not for my needs; and no not an object which meets my aesthetic requirements.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    For the record, I never used the words 'beautiful' or 'ugly'. I simply find the ergonomics of the Fuji GFX100 horribly for my hands. It's a great camera however and will no doubt fit perfectly in the mits of others. Each to their own and variety is the spice of life.

    I find the X1D ii camera to be perfect in the hand, but I've never used one in the field. It might annoy the crap out of me in some other way. Who knows.

    If I had to choose a camera that I think was perfect ergonomically and functionally, I'd choose the Mamiya 7ii. I loved that camera and regret selling it (to pay for a ton of C41 processing of 4x5" and 8x10" film... I'm a sick, sick puppy...)

    Anyway, check back in a year I might have bought the Fuji, but most likely a new CFV back (hopefully with the 100mpx chip, as that'll play betting on my Linhof.)

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by Paratom View Post
    Yes, but first yo uhave to take much more time to understand all those buttons and menues and configure them. For my part I am allways impressed by products with an intuitive user interface.
    If I could choose I would have something with more buttons than Leica but with much less than Pana/Oly etc.
    I have not missed any buttons from the x1d, except a joystick for moving AF point.
    No you don't have to, like you will never do on simpler devices. You could just ignore them and leave them configured from fabric as if they have never been there. Here you are, you'll automagically have the simple brick. The fact that you feel pressed to learn & play all the options is a psychological self-trap.
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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by mristuccia View Post
    No you don't have to, like you will never do on simpler devices. You could just ignore them and leave them configured from fabric as if they have never been there. Here you are, you'll automagically have the simple brick. The fact that you feel pressed to learn & play all the options is a psychological self-trap.
    I guess you could. JPG files, P function, auto white balance ... I'm sure the output would be good enough, but it rather misses the point, don't you think?

    When the Monochrom was first released, some users complained that the files were all too flat, but when you played with the raw files, they were amazing! My approach, for what it's worth, is I want to know what is going to affect the way I use the camera and the output. That generally means direct access to the four main controls and then easy adjustment of secondary settings in a way I find second nature. The menu is not something I access a lot, but when I do I like the architecture to be as flat as possible.

    That said, when I'm new to a camera I do like to explore as much as I can to see what the camera can do, and the way it works.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    You know, the Leica M-D typ 262 was nearly perfect. Options? There are none. Raw files only. Just set focus, exposure, and release the shutter. Chimp? No LCD. Just take pictures.

    Life is (was) beautiful. (I sold it to fund the 907x... )

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by mristuccia View Post
    No you don't have to, like you will never do on simpler devices. You could just ignore them and leave them configured from fabric as if they have never been there. Here you are, you'll automagically have the simple brick. The fact that you feel pressed to learn & play all the options is a psychological self-trap.
    I agree.
    Life is all about options, and cameras that offer more options are bound to appear more complicated but, as you've indicated, they do not have to be. Just use the functions that you need, and as time goes by explore the functions that you've overlooked. As one poster has already said, a complicated camera can be simplified, but a simple camera is just that ... simple, without the potentially useful options that you may benefit from down the road.

    Frankly, I'd hated the simple Leica SL. Sure, it offered some useful functions but some, such as the histogram, could only be employed on its own. If you'd wanted the histogram and grid on the EVF at the same time, for example, you were SOL. I've owned many different Leica iterations, but their current KISS (keep it simple...) philosophy does not suit me, and I've found it just as difficult to recall how many button presses were required for a particular function as some apparently do with multiple, well labeled buttons and levers.
    But everyone has their own requirements, fears and willingness to absorb new information. I recall when BMW first introduced their iDrive. People were confused, outraged and so on, but it was and is a great feature, so much so that other manufacturers have copied it in one form or another and I've find it very intuitive, and had I been one of the iDrive naysayers I would have been embarrassed to admit that it was too complicated for me. But was it complicated? No, it was just something new and different and those purchasers were apparently intimidated by the many potential functions that they did not want to take the time to learn.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by ron787 View Post
    I agree.
    Life is all about options, and cameras that offer more options are bound to appear more complicated but, as you've indicated, they do not have to be. Just use the functions that you need, and as time goes by explore the functions that you've overlooked. As one poster has already said, a complicated camera can be simplified, but a simple camera is just that ... simple, without the potentially useful options that you may benefit from down the road.

    Frankly, I'd hated the simple Leica SL. Sure, it offered some useful functions but some, such as the histogram, could only be employed on its own. If you'd wanted the histogram and grid on the EVF at the same time, for example, you were SOL. I've owned many different Leica iterations, but their current KISS (keep it simple...) philosophy does not suit me, and I've found it just as difficult to recall how many button presses were required for a particular function as some apparently do with multiple, well labeled buttons and levers.
    But everyone has their own requirements, fears and willingness to absorb new information. I recall when BMW first introduced their iDrive. People were confused, outraged and so on, but it was and is a great feature, so much so that other manufacturers have copied it in one form or another and I've find it very intuitive, and had I been one of the iDrive naysayers I would have been embarrassed to admit that it was too complicated for me. But was it complicated? No, it was just something new and different and those purchasers were apparently intimidated by the many potential functions that they did not want to take the time to learn.
    We all have different tastes and needs, and we're the better for it. With your preferences, may I ask what you see in the X1D? It seems to be the antithesis of what you need ...

    Interesting you mention the BMW iDrive. I rented a 3 series a few years ago in NSW. Couldn't set the radio to work, the screen could only do one thing at once, so if I was doing something (navigation?) and my partner wanted to change the aircon, whatever I was doing disappeared! I hated that car in the brief time I used it more than any other car. I'm not intimidated by technology at all - I just loathe it when it is more complicated than it needs to be. Technology is there to serve, not to retrain you.

    SL? just push the bottom right button once to get the additional information screens. Once you've got your head around that, it's relatively intuitive ... for me, anyway.

    Each to their own, I guess.

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    Re: Hasselblad X1D II review

    Quote Originally Posted by Ikarus View Post
    We all have different tastes and needs, and we're the better for it. With your preferences, may I ask what you see in the X1D? It seems to be the antithesis of what you need ...

    Interesting you mention the BMW iDrive. I rented a 3 series a few years ago in NSW. Couldn't set the radio to work, the screen could only do one thing at once, so if I was doing something (navigation?) and my partner wanted to change the aircon, whatever I was doing disappeared! I hated that car in the brief time I used it more than any other car. I'm not intimidated by technology at all - I just loathe it when it is more complicated than it needs to be. Technology is there to serve, not to retrain you.

    SL? just push the bottom right button once to get the additional information screens. Once you've got your head around that, it's relatively intuitive ... for me, anyway.

    Each to their own, I guess.
    Antithesis indeed.

    But it had required ownership of an X1D to arrive at that conclusion. And yes, you can press the bottom right button of the SL to change screens, but they cannot be combined, as per my prior histogram example.

    As for BMW, I have never owned or driven a model 3, but I have owned multiple series 7's, a RR Ghost with iDrive and, currently, a brand new BMW M850i. On these iDrive vehicles there is absolutely no problem operating the radio from the steering wheel, the main screen or with hand gestures, while calling up other vehicular functions. Perhaps your model 3 was among the earliest to feature iDrive, or perhaps iDrive is somehow hobbled on the less costly models.

    BTW, I'd sold my X1D when it had become apparent that it did not suit my needs. To wit, how many current day digital cameras, other than the X1d/II, do you know of, regardless of cost, that do not have a live histogram?

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