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Thread: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

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    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
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    Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    No, it's not me saying it, although it could as well have been. It's the two guys in this video:

    Shooting a DSLR and a Mirrorless on the same job. - YouTube

    The video is a slightly boring conversation, summing up a shoot done with a D800/70-200 and a GH3/35-100. They did not comment on image quality, other than saying that both cameras provide stellar stills as well as video. What we know is that the D800 delivers more on the stills side, while the GH3 is the master of video.

    The interesting part is when it comes to how the cameras work in a real life, particularly when doing hybrid stills/video shooting...

    There's another thread here, called "What, no activity....?". This, I think, is part of the explanation.

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    Senior Member Swissblad's Avatar
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    It could be part of the explanation - BUT - there simply is more activity on the medium format board than here.....

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    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Quote Originally Posted by Swissblad View Post
    It could be part of the explanation - BUT - there simply is more activity on the medium format board than here.....
    Medium format photographers (me too) have a dedication to quality and a passion for their work or hobby that is reflected in their activity on this forum and a couple of others, but when it comes to the general development of cameras and photography, they represent a tiny, insignificant fraction of the big picture.
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    Super Duper
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Nothing against m4/3 and I like the OMD when I ride the bike or want to go out with light equipment.

    There is maybe some overlap between m4/3 and DSLRs, but IMO there are quite some advantages for a DSLR which stand against the 2 advantages of m4/3 (lighter/smaller and EVF advantage for video):
    + nice big OVF without any delay-you see the real thing in real colors and not a display with a black frame
    + usable continous AF for moving subjects
    + smaller AF-points allow more precise focusing (for example on the eye when shooting a portrait vs having to rely on face detection functions)
    + much more lens options, plus the lenses with same f-stop offer much more DOF-flexibility on ff vs m4/3
    + higher resolution
    + while smaller cameras are easier to carry larger ones are better/more solid to hold and to reach for the buttons IMO
    + additional dislplay on the top plate of many DLSRs is really usefull

    And yes, I also believe that the IQ of ff-cameras is even better than m4/3.
    Thats why I do not believe DSLR will disappear - there is a place for both systems.
    For many a DSLR plus a RX100 could be more usefull than a m4/3 which is not really big but also not really small.

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    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Paratom,
    Have you ever done event or sports photography with 8-12 kilograms of camera gear dangling from different parts of your body? After a full weekend of that, I couldn't care less about any of the points you mention if that load can be reduce by 60-70%, except possibly continous AF, but in a couple of years, that will improve further on the mirrorless cameras as well.

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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgen Udvang View Post
    Medium format photographers (me too) have a dedication to quality and a passion for their work or hobby that is reflected in their activity on this forum and a couple of others, but when it comes to the general development of cameras and photography, they represent a tiny, insignificant fraction of the big picture.


    Very odd rationale. I don't know how to characterize it.

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    Workshop Member ptomsu's Avatar
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    I have the feeling that DSLRs are a kind of a dying species. Why use an OVF if an EVF is as good (in the future - near future) or even better than the OVF? Why use a mirror and PDAF via the mirror if the sensor has integrated AF (PDAF as well as CDAF) working as nicely or better than the best AF of any DSLR - we are already at the turning point here.

    I can see that the latest AF revolution at Canon will be their last for DSLRs and also it is questionable if Nikon will improve their AF in order to make it equally good as the latest Canon AF, if both need to finally recognize that the train has left to mirror less.

    I have the certain feeling that my D800E was the last one DSLR I bought and actually would I not have sold all my Sony Alpha gear a few years ago I would have upgraded not for the A99 and never looked back.

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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    I get the impression that you are better off with a Nikon than the A99 as far as AF goes. The separate PDAF appears to have an edge over on sensor PDAF.

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    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    I have a feeling that the translucent mirror system will remain a Sony oddity, not because it's bad in any way, but because it has only one advantage: being able to combine PDAF with an EVF. Sooner or later, other manufacturers will figure out how to make on-sensor PDAF work as well as traditional systems, making the cameras even simpler. I'm sure that there's a race on to introduce the first 35mm mirrorless in a pro format, but smaller and lighter than the A99.

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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgen Udvang View Post
    Medium format photographers (me too) have a dedication to quality and a passion for their work or hobby that is reflected in their activity on this forum and a couple of others, but when it comes to the general development of cameras and photography, they represent a tiny, insignificant fraction of the big picture.
    I guess that depends on your definition of "insignificant." If you take what is regarded as historically and artistically significant work, how much of that was done with mass market cameras? "Affordable" and "popular" are really not the adjectives master's of a discipline use to describe their tools. And what is more likely to inspire you to photography, the work of the masters or the masses. You could say the Ansel Adams and his view camera did more to sell mass market cameras than the folks that uses those cameras. so what was the more significant camera?

    Just sayin'.

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    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Quote Originally Posted by Shashin View Post
    I guess that depends on your definition of "insignificant." If you take what is regarded as historically and artistically significant work, how much of that was done with mass market cameras? "Affordable" and "popular" are really not the adjectives master's of a discipline use to describe their tools. And what is more likely to inspire you to photography, the work of the masters or the masses. You could say the Ansel Adams and his view camera did more to sell mass market cameras than the folks that uses those cameras. so what was the more significant camera?

    Just sayin'.
    Ansel Adams' work may or may not have been significant for the sales of cameras, but that was then and now is now. What sell the most cameras nowadays is gadget value, marketing, design, size, marketing, speed, internet access, more marketing and what some Holly(Bolly)wood star(let) has been paid a zillion dollars to wear around his or her neck.

    I don't know what things look like in your part of the world, but around here, what sells is what is pushed down people's throat through TV commercials and boards on trains, busses, shopping malls, government offices, in your living room, on the street and almost everywhere else, 24 hours per day. Hardly a single word in those ads and commercials is wasted on image quality or the art of taking photographs.

    There are still people around who will appreciate a good photo when they see one, but most people will recognise it only if it's part of an ad (or a sports reportage, which are really ads also, since most of the sports that people are interested in are also 100% commercial), which is where expensive cameras like MF and Canikon's top models move into the picture.

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    Re: Thank you for all those years, Nikon

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgen Udvang View Post
    Ansel Adams' work may or may not have been significant for the sales of cameras, but that was then and now is now. What sell the most cameras nowadays is gadget value, marketing, design, size, marketing, speed, internet access, more marketing and what some Holly(Bolly)wood star(let) has been paid a zillion dollars to wear around his or her neck.

    I don't know what things look like in your part of the world, but around here, what sells is what is pushed down people's throat through TV commercials and boards on trains, busses, shopping malls, government offices, in your living room, on the street and almost everywhere else, 24 hours per day. Hardly a single word in those ads and commercials is wasted on image quality or the art of taking photographs.

    There are still people around who will appreciate a good photo when they see one, but most people will recognise it only if it's part of an ad (or a sports reportage, which are really ads also, since most of the sports that people are interested in are also 100% commercial), which is where expensive cameras like MF and Canikon's top models move into the picture.
    I am not so certain it has ever changed. The majority of the cameras have always been pushed for the consumer with technology that was going to make photography easier and better. Box Brownies were advertised as so easy a child could use it. And certainly advertising has alway been prolific and celebrities have always been pushing products--that goes way back to European Royal families. It is the same world it has always been.

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