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Thread: Nikon Flash for dummies

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    Nikon Flash for dummies

    I am a complete newbie at using a flash. I've decided that Nikon makes it fairly impossible to screw up too badly. My friends got married on New Years Eve. It was a very informal wedding, casual enough to make me the photographer . Even after a wee bit too much champagne I was IMHO bailed out by Nikon. Here are a few.....no PP except switch to D2x profile in Lightroom and output sharpening for screen.

    Attachment 10526


    Attachment 10525


    Attachment 10527


    Attachment 10528

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    Administrator Bob's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Yup,
    IMO, that is one thing that Nikon has nailed.
    -bob

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    You did a excellent job, trick to on camera flash lighting is letting the ambient light show through as much as possible in the background which helps with that flash effect. Key word here is balance
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Terry,

    One of my favorite tricks with Nikon flash is to set the camera to M and the flash to TTL BL. Use ISO 400-800, f/2.8, 1/60th and point the flash up to the ceiling. You won't ever think you used a flash. Just as Guy is recommending, letting in as much ambient light will make your pictures look less "flashy". These shots look really nice, btw.

    David
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    Leica Store Miami

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    David,
    That is almost what I did. I shot at ISO 800, had the flash pointed directly up. I stopped down a little bit because I needed some more DOF. I only screwed up on shutter speed. I was on Aperture Priority. I remember reading where you posted about it. I had a little trouble at the beginning with shutter speed on lower ISO and thats when I bumped it up and all was OK. I am actually pleased with the large number of keepers I got from the party.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    FAB shots Terry
    in particular I Adore the Little Girl in Pink.....Adorable
    & your friend in the 2009 Glasses is a Hoot

    never use FLASH but if I did...Nikon Rules

    Best -H

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Not bad, but sorry, if you were shooting this wedding as an assistant or second camera for me I'd send you back to the drawing board.

    They're all to warm ... making the skin a bit too yellow.

    The blacks are blocked up ... which can be a "Style" IF (big IF) you are doing it on purpose.

    Firing the flash at the ceiling is okay at a distance and if the ceiling isn't a color ... but up close it casts a deep shadow under the chin and accents neck wrinkles or double chins, and the eyes are usually dead looking. At it's worst, it can create "Racoon Eyes" just like shooting at noon outdoors. It also lights unevenly on some images so the forehead is brighter than the chin and chest area.

    Note the flash reflection in the top of the window in the first shot ... which is okay here, but on other shots it can ruin a image.

    The second image works better because it's shot further away so the flash angle is more 3/4 down.

    The little girl is underexposed.

    Now this is not a big deal with a couple of shots to fix in Post, but try it with 800 images from a 10 hour wedding and it IS a big deal.

    The advice to use Manual on the camera and TTL Flash is a good start. When you use Aperture Preferred the camera takes precedence and the image is flooded with Tungsten temp light that is only suplimented by the flash ... so you end up with yellow skin. To do it with real control, it has to be balanced ... The camera controls the exposure of the background, and the flash controls the exposure of the foreground subject. To do that, you need to ride the flash compensation.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    Not bad, but sorry, if you were shooting this wedding as an assistant or second camera for me I'd send you back to the drawing board.

    They're all to warm ... making the skin a bit too yellow.

    The blacks are blocked up ... which can be a "Style" IF (big IF) you are doing it on purpose.

    Firing the flash at the ceiling is okay at a distance and if the ceiling isn't a color ... but up close it casts a deep shadow under the chin and accents neck wrinkles or double chins, and the eyes are usually dead looking. At it's worst, it can create "Racoon Eyes" just like shooting at noon outdoors. It also lights unevenly on some images so the forehead is brighter than the chin and chest area.

    Note the flash reflection in the top of the window in the first shot ... which is okay here, but on other shots it can ruin a image.

    The second image works better because it's shot further away so the flash angle is more 3/4 down.

    The little girl is underexposed.

    Now this is not a big deal with a couple of shots to fix in Post, but try it with 800 images from a 10 hour wedding and it IS a big deal.

    The advice to use Manual on the camera and TTL Flash is a good start. When you use Aperture Preferred the camera takes precedence and the image is flooded with Tungsten temp light that is only suplimented by the flash ... so you end up with yellow skin. To do it with real control, it has to be balanced ... The camera controls the exposure of the background, and the flash controls the exposure of the foreground subject. To do that, you need to ride the flash compensation.
    Thanks for all the tips. I am completely new at using flash so all of the info is very helpful. It is hard to think about everything when it isn't instinctual and you are part of the party . I am going to be getting some instruction on lighting in the near future. Not to worry, I will never do this as a profession!

    I won't have to fix too many shots as she is just going to put a small book together and we will sit down and go through them together.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post

    They're all to warm ... making the skin a bit too yellow.
    Well, I wasn't gonna say it, but since you did.

    I slid the second pic (3 women) off and played around with it a little. I could not get anything close to an acceptable result, it lacks blues and greens, the information is not there to use to fix it.

    It does, however, make a hell of a beautiful b&w image, I used Silver Efex Pro.

    Sorry, but using a single flash for weddings is for rookies. Ok, it works for some candid pix, especially b&w. But in general, minimum of two lights -- one on flash bracket above the camera (think: red eye), and one off at about 45-deg. There is no reason to bounce light off the ceiling, unless you are taking a picture of the ceiling, and as mentioned, the light picks up the color of the ceiling and shares it with your subject.

    I cannot over emphasis the necessity of getting the strobe up off the camera and onto a bracket. If you haven't already, join a gym because the rig is going to get heavy.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by Oxide Blu View Post
    Well, I wasn't gonna say it, but since you did.

    I slid the second pic (3 women) off and played around with it a little. I could not get anything close to an acceptable result, it lacks blues and greens, the information is not there to use to fix it.

    It does, however, make a hell of a beautiful b&w image, I used Silver Efex Pro.

    Sorry, but using a single flash for weddings is for rookies. Ok, it works for some candid pix, especially b&w. But in general, minimum of two lights -- one on flash bracket above the camera (think: red eye), and one off at about 45-deg. There is no reason to bounce light off the ceiling, unless you are taking a picture of the ceiling, and as mentioned, the light picks up the color of the ceiling and shares it with your subject.

    I cannot over emphasis the necessity of getting the strobe up off the camera and onto a bracket. If you haven't already, join a gym because the rig is going to get heavy.
    I am not a pro, will never be a pro, will never shoot a full wedding etc. My friend was having a very informal wedding in her apartment on New Years Eve. It was casual (although not all women do casual - ever). She was not getting a photographer and asked me to take pictures for her.

    So, I wouldn't even put myself in the rookie category hence my in the first post. I am also brand new to using flash and will be taking a lighting class (my first) later this month. I guess I was just happy that I was able to capture shots the didn't scream flash right in the face with a big shadow or darkness behind. I've reprocessed the picture (you took a low quality jpeg) two ways one changing around the white balance but also trying to reduce the redness in skin tone of one and then a simple lightroom based B&W conversion.

    Attachment 10631


    Attachment 10630

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Good thoughts from experienced users - but nice pics too TEB!

    I havent gotten around to reading the 1000000 page manual which came with my Nikon flash - I gave up on Canon . saving it for winter time project!

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterA View Post
    Good thoughts from experienced users - but nice pics too TEB!

    I havent gotten around to reading the 1000000 page manual which came with my Nikon flash - I gave up on Canon . saving it for winter time project!
    That new Nikon School DVD about the CLS flash system is a pretty good investment, IMO.

    Yeah, I know, the pricetag of forty bones (at NikonMall) may sound steep when there are so many instructional videos on the web for free. But the production quality is high and the presentation is very logical. I've had some CLS experience, so strictly speaking there wasn't much on the DVD that was completely new to me -- but after watching it, I found that my knowledge had become more "available" to me as a result of seeing the info recapped in such a well-organized format. Worth considering for anyone trying to get his/her head around the basic concepts of Nikon flash, I'd say...

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    TEB, after your adjustment the color is better, but that B&W just rocks!!!

    I did wedding photography, professionally. Now that you are all done photographing the wedding I can tell you everything you did wrong.

    Every image that went to the bride was considered for how it will be perceived now, and in 20-years. That image in b&w will stand the test of time, will be something of value to your friend in 20-years from now. You did good.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    That new Nikon School DVD about the CLS flash system is a pretty good investment, IMO.

    Yeah, I know, the pricetag of forty bones (at NikonMall) may sound steep when there are so many instructional videos on the web for free. But the production quality is high and the presentation is very logical. I've had some CLS experience, so strictly speaking there wasn't much on the DVD that was completely new to me -- but after watching it, I found that my knowledge had become more "available" to me as a result of seeing the info recapped in such a well-organized format. Worth considering for anyone trying to get his/her head around the basic concepts of Nikon flash, I'd say...
    Thanks for the link Ranger 9

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger 9 View Post
    That new Nikon School DVD about the CLS flash system is a pretty good investment, IMO.

    Yeah, I know, the pricetag of forty bones (at NikonMall) may sound steep when there are so many instructional videos on the web for free. But the production quality is high and the presentation is very logical. I've had some CLS experience, so strictly speaking there wasn't much on the DVD that was completely new to me -- but after watching it, I found that my knowledge had become more "available" to me as a result of seeing the info recapped in such a well-organized format. Worth considering for anyone trying to get his/her head around the basic concepts of Nikon flash, I'd say...
    I was waiting for it to be released but then I got all busy with moving. I almost pulled the trigger on it this past weekend and thought I would wait until after i had some instruction and then get it.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by Oxide Blu View Post
    TEB, after your adjustment the color is better, but that B&W just rocks!!!

    I did wedding photography, professionally. Now that you are all done photographing the wedding I can tell you everything you did wrong.

    Every image that went to the bride was considered for how it will be perceived now, and in 20-years. That image in b&w will stand the test of time, will be something of value to your friend in 20-years from now. You did good.
    When she gets back in town we will go over them and figure out what to do. I left her the disk under instructions she was NOT allowed to send anything to print. This past summer I enlightened her on straightening out her horizons before sending stuff out for printing so we should be just fine. There are a lot of shots that I would certainly look to do in B&W.

    Thanks for the tips before, sorry if I was snippy but wedding photography is not my thing so elaborate setups just weren't going to happen.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Terry, an excellent gadget for transforming the otherwise useless popup flash into a real tool is Gary Fong's Puffer. It's a shoe mounted diffuser that wraps around the popup flash. With some deft flash EV adjustment, you can crank out some decent images at close range with this.

    Here is a shot of the Puffer mounted on my D300


    Here are photos of two [strike]victims[/strike] subjects both shot at point blank range:




    Normally, being flashed directly at this range meant have the complexion of a cave eel, but as you can see both came through the ordeal looking none the worse for wear.
    Carlos Echenique | Carlos Echenique Photography |Olympus OM-D E-M1 MK II | Olympus Pen-F - M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 25mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8, Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS, M.Zuiko 75mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by etrigan63 View Post
    Terry, an excellent gadget for transforming the otherwise useless popup flash into a real tool is Gary Fong's Puffer. It's a shoe mounted diffuser that wraps around the popup flash. With some deft flash EV adjustment, you can crank out some decent images at close range with this.

    Here is a shot of the Puffer mounted on my D300


    Here are photos of two [strike]victims[/strike] subjects both shot at point blank range:




    Normally, being flashed directly at this range meant have the complexion of a cave eel, but as you can see both came through the ordeal looking none the worse for wear.
    Very nice Carlos. I'll have to get me one of these. Do you have a link to Gary Fong's site?

    Woody

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    http://www.garyfong.com

    The Puffer retails for $19.95.
    Carlos Echenique | Carlos Echenique Photography |Olympus OM-D E-M1 MK II | Olympus Pen-F - M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 25mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8, Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS, M.Zuiko 75mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Thanks Carlos!

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by etrigan63 View Post
    ......otherwise useless popup flash.........
    This cannot go unchallenged. I would recommend Nikon for it's easy flash above any other virtues, and the pop-up flash is an important link in the flash set-up providing you use it as a Commander control for one [or more] 600/800/900 flashguns.

    Here's my recommendation; get the flash off the camera, preferably on a light stand, have the flash firing through a 'shoot through' umbrella, and control the flash exposure from the camera using the rear thumbwheel. For this way of controlled flash shooting [I like gentle flash, use it in addition to ambient light] the pop-up is a fantastic resource; fabulous rather than useless.

    .............. Chris

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Chris,
    I find it a mite difficult to to mingle and shoot in an informal setting dragging around a flash umbrella. Tends to poke people in the eyes. Sometimes even using a flashgun (600/800/900 or, in my case, Metz 58A-1) can get a little obtrusive.

    In my case, I have two choices:
    1. Use my M8 - which is fine if I am not shooting moving objects (I am not quick on the manual focus) or
    2. Take the MB-D10 off of my D300, slap on my 35mm f2 and use the popup flash. The Puffer makes it quite usable.


    It's use in Commander mode is unquestionable - utterly priceless. As a light source by itself, not so much without help.
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    I have an SU-800 Commander that I got for my D2x. The D2x got replaced by a D300, so I had a chance to test the range of the SU-800 against the D300 popup in commander mode. Range was roughly equal.

    The SU-800 is essentially a flash with an infrared flash cover. I also tested the SU-800 range with the infrared cover removed - got perhaps 10-15% more range but not more than that.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by etrigan63 View Post
    .....It's use in Commander mode is unquestionable - utterly priceless. As a light source by itself, not so much without help.
    Carlos - I think we mostly agree. It's true of course that 'remote' firing is more work; but boy is it easy compared to shooting film with off-camera flash. Being able to thumb-wheel control flash output from the viewfinder readout is fabulous too. Perhaps, on reflection; poking people in the eye with an umbrella prong is best avoided.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    ..... SU-800 against the D300 popup in commander mode. Range was roughly equal...... SU-800.. perhaps 10-15% more range......
    Lars - I'm grateful to you for stating this, it's the first time I've seen the comparison in print and I would have expected the SU-800 to give more.

    ............. Chris

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris C View Post
    Lars - I'm grateful to you for stating this, it's the first time I've seen the comparison in print and I would have expected the SU-800 to give more.
    Yes it's a bit underwhelming considering the price tag on the SU-800. However, it does have it's niche: on D2/D3 series without popup flash, plus it's much less blinding if you're shooting portraits. I can't help wondering why Nikon hasn't produced an RF system though - IR line of sight can be a bit of a limitation especially outdoors in strong sunlight. Apart from that it's a remarkably good flash system considering the cost and portability.
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    One point in favor of the SU-800 vs. using the built-in flash as a CLS controller is that if you're shooting at wide apertures and close distances, the built-in flash will make a visible contribution to the light in the scene. You'll notice extra catchlights, shadows, and reflections in shiny objects. This is true of any flash-controlled wireless TTL system, not just Nikon's, and there's no way to avoid it: the "start" pulse happens before the shutter opens, but the "stop" pulse to terminate flash exposure has to happen while the shutter is still open.

    I don't have an SU-800 yet, but I've had this problem often enough that I plan to get one eventually.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    For the record, you can set the popup flash not to fire and still control off camera flashes. I did this for a photo shoot of a cabin up in North Carolina last November.
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by etrigan63 View Post
    ....you can set the popup flash not to fire and still control off camera flashes....
    And failing that option the visible light part of the output can always be filtered out - which is presumably what the SU800 does.

    .............. Chris

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by etrigan63 View Post
    For the record, you can set the popup flash not to fire and still control off camera flashes. I did this for a photo shoot of a cabin up in North Carolina last November.
    No, it still fires even if it's set to be used only as the controller. The way it controls the off-camera flashes is by emitting short flash bursts that act as control pulses; the spacing and timing of the control pulses transmits the info to the off-camera units.

    The pre-exposure control pulses are sent just before the camera shutter opens, so have no effect on the exposure. But the pulses that tell the off-camera units to terminate their output happen while the shutter is open; there's no way to avoid that, because the shutter has to be open while the off-camera units are firing, and it's the termination pulse that tells them to stop firing.

    Super-crude ASCII representation of what's happening:

    ******************************************[open]
    Camera shutter: ---------| |------------

    Remote units: _______/---------------\__________

    Commander: ____^^___________^____________
    [start] [stop]

    The control pulses are very short and very low in power, so it's true you won't notice them in most moderate-aperture, medium-distance shooting. But if you're shooting at wide apertures and close distances, the control pulses can still contribute enough to the exposure to be visible.

    But don't take my word for it; prove it to yourself. Set up a shot with remote flashes and your on-camera flash set to commander-only mode. Include a mirror in the scene, angled so the camera will be visible in the shot. (Don't have the camera pointing straight into the mirror or it'll throw off your exposure.) Then take the shot and look at the result. You'll see the on-camera flash is firing during the exposure; what's showing up in the picture is the control pulse that tells the off-camera units to stop firing.

    Incidentally, don't blame Nikon for this; all manufacturers' off-camera TTL systems work the same way, via control pulses emitted from the commander unit. (If I recall correctly, Minolta invented this concept and Olympus, under license, was the first to use it in a camera system.)


    The SU-800 works exactly the same way; the only difference is that it's got an IR filter over its flash tube so it doesn't emit visible light. As Chris said, putting an IR filter over the built-in flash does the same thing. The remote units are IR-filtered (that's the dark plastic lens over the sensor "eye") so there will be little or no effect on range.

    Old trick: If you've still got a box of Kodachrome slides somewhere with the black leader still stuck in the box (labs used to include the cut-off leader in case there were partial exposures on it) the black piece makes a pretty good IR filter; Kodachrome dyes were formulated to stop visible light but pass infrared, so they wouldn't heat up as quickly in the projector.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Sorry, my ASCII picture didn't turn out too well because the spaces got truncated. The picture should show that the camera shutter remains open until AFTER the remote units have received the termination pulse from the controller and stopped firing.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by Lars Vinberg View Post
    I can't help wondering why Nikon hasn't produced an RF system though - IR line of sight can be a bit of a limitation especially outdoors in strong sunlight.
    Part of the problem is the freqs available. Different countries have diff freqs reserved for diff applications. Apparently there is no one universal freq that can be used. Reference the Radio Popper.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    O.B. is correct. The use of radio frequencies is controlled by the government Communications Bureaus. Aside from international military channels, how a country use radio frequencies is entirely up to them. No one has succeeded in allocating a certain frequency range for remote control operation because there is no money in it. Or more correctly, no one is willing to fork over enough cash to get everyone to agree on a standard.
    Carlos Echenique | Carlos Echenique Photography |Olympus OM-D E-M1 MK II | Olympus Pen-F - M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 25mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8, Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS, M.Zuiko 75mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

  33. #33
    Senior Member Hacker's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Pocket Wizards or Elinchrom EL-Skyports?

  34. #34
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    The caucasian fellow looks like the "Predator" has a lock on him.
    Last edited by peby; 12th March 2009 at 17:11. Reason: I'm not used to the thread format on this forum and it looks like this reply is out of sync. It was a reply to post #17.

  35. #35
    peby
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by etrigan63 View Post
    http://www.garyfong.com

    The Puffer retails for $19.95.
    If you want to save a few bux, take a piece of that white foam packing material that's used for damage control in shipping and place a layer or two over the flash.
    Makes a great diffuser.

  36. #36
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Except that I ran out of hands at holding the camera and controlling the zoom. I'm all for economizing, but sometimes folks can go too far...

    Carlos Echenique | Carlos Echenique Photography |Olympus OM-D E-M1 MK II | Olympus Pen-F - M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 25mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8, Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS, M.Zuiko 75mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

  37. #37
    Oxide Blu
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Quote Originally Posted by peby View Post
    If you want to save a few bux, take a piece of that white foam packing material that's used for damage control in shipping and place a layer or two over the flash.
    Makes a great diffuser.
    You need to be really careful about what you out over the output of a strobe. I took a sheet of Lee 87 or 89 infrared gel and laid it over the top of my flash, pointed up at the ceiling. I wanted to see if any visible light would get past it.

    Popped the flash -- in TTL mode -- and it lit off at full power for the longest duration. I guess the filter blocked the light output -- -- and of course the strobe is looking for light coming back, not seeing it, and keeps pumping power to the flash.

    Oh, that infrared filter, it flew off the strobe about 3 or 4 feet into the air. The part that was over the strobe output was instantly fried, melted, looked like a rejected potato chip. That just from the energy of absorbing light.

    For homemade strobe diffusion I like to use the heat resistant theater gels designed specifically for diffusing light. You can get about 1-sq yard of the stuff for around $5 to $8. Buy it in 1-stop, 1/2-stop, or 1/4-stop. Use multiple layers of the stuff if needed.

    See the light defusing gels near the bottom of this page:

    http://www.rosco.com/us/filters/roscolux.asp#colors

  38. #38
    Senior Member Lars's Avatar
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Another Don't try this at home:

    I once fired my SB-26 by accident while it was standing upside down on a laser-printed paper sheet. The text on the paper fused with the clear cover on the flash. Now everytime the flash is fired the fused text on the front emits a puff of smoke and there is an ozone smell. Still, after ten years. Weird.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

  39. #39
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Terry,
    Glad you posted this as I've learned something from the responses. Interesting that Gary Fong has a different take on using the Nikon flash system. If you're interested here's the link to his video tutorial (click on Canon vs Nikon flash at the top left of the page)

    http://flashdiffuser.com/

  40. #40
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    There is actually a simple solution to the built in flash commander mode without contamination of picture.

    Nikon has an IR panel that clips into hotshoe and block visible flash while still retaining the CLS control

    nikon SG-31R IR Panel for Built-In Flash

    http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-SG-31R-R.../dp/B000E1G0LI

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Nikon has a very good instructional video on the CLS system hosted by Bob Krist of National Geographic Fame and Joe McNally, a recognized expert on lighting.

    It is available from the Nikon store (Nikon Mall) and is a bit pricey (around $35 IIRC) but I think worth the price, especially if you are thinking about using the Nikon flashes as a system since they add up to serious money.

    Woody

  42. #42
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Rocky Nook just published a new book on The Nikon Creative Lighting System ..by Mike Hagen. Quick read looks like it might be good for covering all the bases on the operation of the SB-900 also covers the other flashes as well.

  43. #43
    GroovyGeek
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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    Free tutorial... one of the best I have seen
    http://www.planetneil.com/tangents/f...hy-techniques/

    All the basics are there --- dragging the shutter, bouncing flash, lots of nice instructive images on the effects of flash.

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    The Joe McNally book on lighting (Hot Shoe Diaries) is excellent. One thing Joe points out is that you can supplement a single flash with ambient/available light to get some nice portrait lighting.

    Here is a shot I took tonight of my friends daughter for a portrait I am giving her Mom for her birthday. I use one flash (Metz 58A-1 + Gary Fong diffuser) and two porch lamps, positioning myself so the lamps warmer light would highlight her hair and add some color to her skin.



    I think her mom will be happy.
    Carlos Echenique | Carlos Echenique Photography |Olympus OM-D E-M1 MK II | Olympus Pen-F - M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 25mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8, Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS, M.Zuiko 75mm f/1.8, M.Zuiko 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO

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    Re: Nikon Flash for dummies

    From a shoot I did of UK Olympic Diver Nick Robinson Baker. So he forgave me for the in flight shot expression I did the posed shot with the flash diffused a bit. I needed unmodified full power to catch him in the air. As he was a second or two from hitting the water at 32 feet per second per second there wasn't really enough time to get him to look relaxed and into camera. He had other things on his mind I guess. Having heard of some of the horrendous injuries divers get I would never try to distract them and know they can deal with a flash, when they no it's coming.
    I've added a SD-9 battery pack to boost recycling on shoots. Silly price for a 8 battery holder but does the job. One of the main reasons I went Nikon was because of the flash. Canon's flash, on digital, did my head in and initially I went Olympus because of the lenses. Then I drank Jono dry under the pretext of buying some Nikon gear off him
    David
    Last edited by DavidL; 1st July 2011 at 13:03.

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