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Thread: D800E files on old MacPro ?

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    D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Hi there,

    I'm not very keen on the new MacPRO : very much video orientated.

    So I want to replace my aging MacBook PRO 17" ( i7 2.7ghz ) which is moderate for D800E files ( brushes are so so in speed in C1, sliders take 0.5 secs to reflect things.. ) and I'm looking into a MacPro 2010 model ( 8 core, 2.40ghz ) ... so I can upgrade its ram to 24-36gb and its disk to SSD..

    anyone has a simular setup ? how it handles D800 files ?

    I will also upgrade its GPU to a 680GX or wereabouts - I like the odd gamiing here and there and an expandable MacPro seems perfect ( had a original 1,1 and I miss it ) - rather being tied down to a iMac with a petty mobile GPU or paying quite a few extra for a NewMacPro which is very much video centric - it can do photography, I'm pretty sure, but for pure photography and occasional gaming, I would rather go for a iMac 27".

    So, anyone has a MacPro 8 core ( 2010 model ) with preferably an SSD and a D800/D800e ? How it is processing ? Snappy ?

    Best ,

    GP
    Leica M9 | 50mm Summilux ASPH | www.proenca.eu

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Hi,

    I use a 2008 MacPro 8 core with 16 GB Ram for my Hasselblad H3-39 files for everdays work - fine for me

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    My 2008 MacPro was leagues behind my 2014 MBP in processing ability on large files, not even in the same state let alone zipcode.

    By all accounts the newest MacPro is the cat's pajamas for editing and connectivity, but you want the fast single 6-core for photography, not the slower dual quad or dual hex. And then for the price, you might as well load it with ram, drive and GPU to the max -- $6600 US when you're all said and done.

    That said, my 2014 MBP does a fine job with D800 files, though the limited connectivity is getting to me and I'll likely spring for the MAcPro above later this year.
    Jack
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    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."
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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    My current-model MBP (2.3GHz Core i7) is about 5x as fast as my 2010 MBP (2.6? Core i7) was. A lot of progress bars that once made sense just flicker by on it. It's FAST.

    The 2010 MBP was slightly faster than my 8-core 2008 Mac Pro. Basically, the current MBP just leaves the 2008 MP in the dust.

    This includes just about any workload that you can throw at it. Add in USB3 and all the other good little upgrades and it's really, really nice. (The built-in SDXC slot is also on USB3.)

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    I'm probably going to upgrade my 8-core 2008 mac pro within the next year. Not because it performs poorly, but because it's currently the oldest desktop supported by the newest OS, which means the obsolescence clock is ticking. Better to sell before that happens.

    I would replace with a 2010 or 2011 6-core model, running 3.33ghz. This has proved to be the fastest configuration for photoshop. Unless you're doing some heavy multitasking while processing photos, there's more cost than benefit to the additional cores.

    I would absolutely not get the latest mac pro. While it could be configured to be marginally faster, the performance / price gain would be terrible. Most of the cost of these machines can be attributed to the two workstation-class video cards, which would only slightly and occasionally be taken advantage of by photoshop.

    If you're doing video, 3D, visualizations, or scientific computing, the new mac pro is beast. It's really not designed for us.

    I also don't like that it requires us to have an external drive enclosure. Video guys have these already, but for me, the 4 bays of the old mac pro are perfectly adequate. I'm confused by something with such an elegant form factor, if the design requires adding a nest of wires and external appliances.

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    My 2008 MacPro was leagues behind my 2014 MBP in processing ability on large files, not even in the same state let alone zipcode.

    By all accounts the newest MacPro is the cat's pajamas for editing and connectivity, but you want the fast single 6-core for photography, not the slower dual quad or dual hex. And then for the price, you might as well load it with ram, drive and GPU to the max -- $6600 US when you're all said and done.

    That said, my 2014 MBP does a fine job with D800 files, though the limited connectivity is getting to me and I'll likely spring for the MAcPro above later this year.
    I see a lot of those comments on MacPro 2008 users - but isnt that because of the HDD ?

    My MBP is a 17", 2010 i7 2.7ghz dual core one and I just gave it a breath of life by installling a SSD.

    Couldnt the same be done on a MP 2010 ? Plus with a current GPU ( lets say a ATI r9 or a GTX680 ? )

    Quote Originally Posted by Jan Brittenson View Post
    My current-model MBP (2.3GHz Core i7) is about 5x as fast as my 2010 MBP (2.6? Core i7) was. A lot of progress bars that once made sense just flicker by on it. It's FAST.

    The 2010 MBP was slightly faster than my 8-core 2008 Mac Pro. Basically, the current MBP just leaves the 2008 MP in the dust.

    This includes just about any workload that you can throw at it. Add in USB3 and all the other good little upgrades and it's really, really nice. (The built-in SDXC slot is also on USB3.)
    That 2010 is my current one.

    The i5, i7 malarchy reminds me the Pentium days. Its confusing now.

    i7 that are 4 and 5 times faster than... same speed i7's... doesnt make sense.

    Intel should be smarter by now, but it isnt.

    In the 386, 486 days everything was easy - the faster the speed, the better the CPU

    Then Pentium cpu's came along and intel had a hardtime educating the public that a Pentium III at 1500ghz was much better than a Pentium II at 2000 ghz.

    You would have expected by now they would have learned. But no :P

    Quote Originally Posted by paulraphael View Post
    I'm probably going to upgrade my 8-core 2008 mac pro within the next year. Not because it performs poorly, but because it's currently the oldest desktop supported by the newest OS, which means the obsolescence clock is ticking. Better to sell before that happens.

    I would replace with a 2010 or 2011 6-core model, running 3.33ghz. This has proved to be the fastest configuration for photoshop. Unless you're doing some heavy multitasking while processing photos, there's more cost than benefit to the additional cores.

    I would absolutely not get the latest mac pro. While it could be configured to be marginally faster, the performance / price gain would be terrible. Most of the cost of these machines can be attributed to the two workstation-class video cards, which would only slightly and occasionally be taken advantage of by photoshop.

    If you're doing video, 3D, visualizations, or scientific computing, the new mac pro is beast. It's really not designed for us.

    I also don't like that it requires us to have an external drive enclosure. Video guys have these already, but for me, the 4 bays of the old mac pro are perfectly adequate. I'm confused by something with such an elegant form factor, if the design requires adding a nest of wires and external appliances.
    I'm really struggling here.

    I find the price for a New Mac PRO 6 core a bit high - and specially because it is very much video orientated.

    I **could** be ALMOST ok with the price if I knew that it was a killer photo machine ( which it is, on its own right ) and the best - but an iMac 27" fully specced just trounces the nMP for photo editing and cost 1000 usd less.

    "so buy a iMac27" everyone says. well.. it buggers me to spend 3000 euros on a imac with ZERO upgradability on the near future. And knowing that in 3-4 years a replacement is to be bought... so for that I would rather have a MacPro ( new or old ) that IF I want, I can upgrade the ram, the cpu, the videocards.

    Its easier with the 2010 models - GPU versions are abound, ram is cheap and the whole thing cost half the price of a nMP - but zero warranty, zero support from apple and if they just want to leave on the side with upgrades and so on, they will ( MacPro 1.1 is now confined to 10.7. No upgrade possible )





    In the end, my MBP does "okayish" with my D800E files - I think I will buy a decent 27" monitor and save some money for a newMacPro in the future... but I would buy a different thing in a heartbeat - MacPro orientated for photographers, MacMini beefed up with ram and discreete GPU, old Mac Pro with two year warranties..

    New laptop is a no no - specially because I bought a new Mac Air for my wife ( her bday ) and she rarely uses it..
    Leica M9 | 50mm Summilux ASPH | www.proenca.eu

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    I was not going to enter into this conversation concerning machines...but your response has prompted me to counter the other advice with my own experience.

    I have a late 2010 MacPro that replaced an early one....

    2.4 Dual Quad Core with 32 MB memory...Samsung 750 SSD for the operating system a SSD PCI RAM drive for Lightroom catalog and main file storage...three extra internal Hitachi 2/3GB drives....and external eSATA 4GB G-Drive raid and two external Seagate 2GB drives with internal CD/DVD writer and an external Bluray writer.

    Nvidia Geforce GTX 680 and a Dell U2711 Display.

    It can handle any file I can throw at it with no difficulty and it seems fast enough for me...

    I run Leica S files with multiple layers without a problem....Also have run RED EPIC 5K files under Premiere without difficulty...1.4 - 2 Gb running without any noticeable slowdown.

    I would recommend the newer 2103 Trashcan MacPro as mine is a space heater...only surpassed by my tube amps....ok in the winter but can necessitate a ceiling fan in the Texas summers.

    The expansion capability of the older MacPro is great the ability to use RAID certainly obviates the supposed advantage of Thunderbolt and USB3 for drive arrays.

    That said I will move to a 2013 Eight core with dual 700 video 1TB SSD and equivalent RAM to the present machine as video 4K will drive the need for more bandwidth. Nothing in the still photography range would necessitate the move.
    However a decent external display that can be profiled is a necessity irregardless of the underlying system...and the Mac displays fall a bit short of ideal.

    Mac Powerbooks are great for travel and have become very viable as stand alone systems but they do preclude much in the way of expansion.

    As to warranty...these things are so reliable and parts are not an issue...you can replace almost anything on them ... easily accessible sources on Ebay at a fraction of the cost from Apple as folks move on up.

    Reality is that most of our decisions are based on availability of product and you may be best served with the newer model....

    Regards,


    Bob

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by proenca View Post
    Hi there,

    I'm not very keen on the new MacPRO : very much video orientated.

    So I want to replace my aging MacBook PRO 17" ( i7 2.7ghz ) which is moderate for D800E files ( brushes are so so in speed in C1, sliders take 0.5 secs to reflect things.. ) and I'm looking into a MacPro 2010 model ( 8 core, 2.40ghz ) ... so I can upgrade its ram to 24-36gb and its disk to SSD..

    anyone has a simular setup ? how it handles D800 files ?

    I will also upgrade its GPU to a 680GX or wereabouts - I like the odd gamiing here and there and an expandable MacPro seems perfect ( had a original 1,1 and I miss it ) - rather being tied down to a iMac with a petty mobile GPU or paying quite a few extra for a NewMacPro which is very much video centric - it can do photography, I'm pretty sure, but for pure photography and occasional gaming, I would rather go for a iMac 27".

    So, anyone has a MacPro 8 core ( 2010 model ) with preferably an SSD and a D800/D800e ? How it is processing ? Snappy ?

    Best ,

    GP
    I was using a first gen MacPro for years but finally had to upgrade because of incompatibility with newer OS and software. Waited for new MacPro to be announced but decided to go with late 2012 3.33 GHz 6 core, 26 gig ram and SSD as main drive. I can also use some of my peripherals from my old Pro. IIRC cost was around $3000 new. Quite happy with speed with LR and 800E files.

    Steve

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by proenca View Post
    I see a lot of those comments on MacPro 2008 users - but isnt that because of the HDD ?
    Not likely -- my 2008 MacPro OS was running on a pair of SSD's set up in RAID-0.
    Jack
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    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    My 2008 MacPro was leagues behind my 2014 MBP in processing ability on large files, not even in the same state let alone zipcode.

    By all accounts the newest MacPro is the cat's pajamas for editing and connectivity, but you want the fast single 6-core for photography, not the slower dual quad or dual hex. And then for the price, you might as well load it with ram, drive and GPU to the max -- $6600 US when you're all said and done.

    That said, my 2014 MBP does a fine job with D800 files, though the limited connectivity is getting to me and I'll likely spring for the MAcPro above later this year.
    Jack,the ability to increase RAM is a big deal,a friend of mine is using the latest MBP with an Eizo and he is surprised at just how fast my nMP 6core is with 64gb ram,the 16gb limit on the Mbp is too limiting.

    Besides the dual GPU on the nMP is another big bonus and I think the next version of C1P is set up to use both cards

    I had a 2010 6core with 32gb of ram,Raid Zero SSD'S and that was pretty fast but now that everything is thunderbolt and USB3 orientated I would avoid that too..

    Rob

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Rob, I know the new MP is a better machine all around than my MBP and why I'll be getting pone, but I need to wait for the funds to accumulate
    Jack
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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    Rob, I know the new MP is a better machine all around than my MBP and why I'll be getting pone, but I need to wait for the funds to accumulate
    You'll love it,I'm also trying to fill the piggybank to be ready for the Eizo 4k. ;-)

    Rob

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by SHV View Post
    ...Waited for new MacPro to be announced but decided to go with late 2012 3.33 GHz 6 core, 26 gig ram and SSD as main drive. I can also use some of my peripherals from my old Pro. IIRC cost was around $3000 new. Quite happy with speed with LR and 800E files.

    Steve
    I think this is the most practical way to go right now. Getting the latest of the old models is good hedge against OS obsolescence. Or, you might get even better deals (with minor performance sacrifice) from a 2010 model.

    Anyone contemplating a 2013+ mac pro needs to consider the cost of a drive enclosure, if you don't already have one. Ideally you'd want a thunderbolt raid array, and they don't come cheap. Also keep in mind how much of the price of computer is tied up in those workstation graphics cards, which are only minimally relevant to photography.

    [As an aside, if you look at the price of the retail version of those graphics cards, the new mac pro is an almost impossibly good deal for someone who will take advantage of its powers.]

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    Re: D800E files on old MacPro ?

    Quote Originally Posted by paulraphael View Post

    Anyone contemplating a 2013+ mac pro needs to consider the cost of a drive enclosure, if you don't already have one. Ideally you'd want a thunderbolt raid array, and they don't come cheap.
    Good point. I do happen to have a 4x2TB Thunderbolt RAID array and then [email protected] 2x4TB USB3 back-up arrays. The USB3 arrays are relatively inexpensive and perfectly adequate for back-up. The Thunderbolt array is expensive, but is essentially as fast as working direct to main flash drive in real-world processing situations.
    Jack
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