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Thread: D850

  1. #401
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    Re: D850

    Steen,

    I do not have anything against the film aesthetics.

    If anyone is occupied with all the gear based factors you list (and more) before tripping the shutter, they should not be buying a camera. My 0.02c.

    OTOH, there is nothing wrong with checking out the gear that I would use, ahead of time and buy the right stuff that suits my purposes.

    Jorgen bought the D810, it would not suit him and went back to his m43rds. Nothing wrong with that.

  2. #402
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    Re: D850

    Taken to the extreme there is the quintessential stoner argument that rather than using a single shot stills camera. a photographer could use a video camera and pick the best frames for their photos. Technologically we are there, or at least almost there. In a few years we'll have capture devices with multiple lenses making multiple versions of the same scene, calculating the image we want by combining various focal lengths and focus points.

    Versus the retro approach of making one image at a time, waiting for that decisive moment.

    We can gripe about modern media, I certainly do, but what difference does it make? There are wonderful expressive video clips and stills taken from streams of photos out there on social media and they compare just as well as the classic film stills.

    The thing about many of the famous Magnum/Life photos wasn't that the photographer was all that exceptional but that they were there, their organizations got them access to D-Day and war zones, moon launches and exotic locales. Robert Capa was not a particularly good photographer, Eisenstadt was probably a wonderful personality but did he really shoot anything different than hundreds of other press photographers?

    We bemoan the loss of classic photojournalism but I rather like that billions of people can be amateur photojournalists. Image making should be like writing, not a specialty but a universal skill, with some practitioners doing it better than others.
    Last edited by Frankly; 4 Days Ago at 10:40.
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankly View Post
    Taken to the extreme there is the quintessential stoner argument that rather than using a single shot stills camera. a photographer could use a video camera and pick the best frames for their photos. Technologically we are there, or at least almost there. In a few years we'll have capture devices with multiple lenses making multiple versions of the same scene, calculating the image we want by combining various focal lengths and focus points.

    Versus the retro approach of making one image at a time, waiting for that decisive moment.

    We can gripe about modern media, I certainly do, but what difference does it make? There are wonderful expressive video clips and stills taken from streams of photos out there on social media and they compare just as well as the classic film stills.

    The thing about many of the famous Magnum/Life photos wasn't that the photographer was all that exceptional but that they were there, their organizations got them access to D-Day and war zones, moon launches and exotic locales. Robert Capa was not a particularly good photographer, Eisenstadt was probably a wonderful personality but did he really shoot anything different than hundreds of other press photographers?

    We bemoan the loss of classic photojournalism but I rather like that billions of people can be amateur photojournalists. Image making should be like writing, not a specialty but a universal skill, with some practitioners doing it better than others.
    So, by this diatribe, there is no longer any need or desire for the skilled photographer in the world. Great. All you folks can simply click away while I practice photography ... I no longer need to make a living from photography, I do it for myself.

    G
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    Re: D850

    This thread is obviously taking a turn, but it's a good discussion.

    @Frankly -- I agree that "being there" is half the battle. And taking a still from a movie is essentially what sports photographers have been doing ever since motor-drives were invented

    @Godfrey -- I agree that knowing when to click is half the battle. Of course having 30 (or 60) frames per second to choose from alleviates this to a certain degree... Knowing how to set the camera was definitely a thing back when, as was focusing it properly, but now the cam does both for you, and frankly most of the time better than we can. I see the niche for today's photographer being perspective, framing/focal length and aperture for desired effect --- that's where the art of photography now lies. Okay, need to add in lighting modification whether natural or artificial.
    Jack
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankly View Post
    Taken to the extreme there is the quintessential stoner argument that rather than using a single shot stills camera. a photographer could use a video camera and pick the best frames for their photos. Technologically we are there, or at least almost there. In a few years we'll have capture devices with multiple lenses making multiple versions of the same scene, calculating the image we want by combining various focal lengths and focus points.

    Versus the retro approach of making one image at a time, waiting for that decisive moment.

    We can gripe about modern media, I certainly do, but what difference does it make? There are wonderful expressive video clips and stills taken from streams of photos out there on social media and they compare just as well as the classic film stills.

    The thing about many of the famous Magnum/Life photos wasn't that the photographer was all that exceptional but that they were there, their organizations got them access to D-Day and war zones, moon launches and exotic locales. Robert Capa was not a particularly good photographer, Eisenstadt was probably a wonderful personality but did he really shoot anything different than hundreds of other press photographers?

    We bemoan the loss of classic photojournalism but I rather like that billions of people can be amateur photojournalists. Image making should be like writing, not a specialty but a universal skill, with some practitioners doing it better than others.
    Shooting good video and good stills will normally give two totally different results. As a photographer, you will be looking for that one moment that sums up the whole action. When you make video, you will through a sequence of occurences at the scene describe the development of the action, hopefully to end up with a final scene that will be remembered. The latter may not contain the "decisive moment" of the photographer at all, since it's a totally different way of telling a story.

    Try to take the exceptional final scene of The Passenger, Antonioni's great movie, out of context, and you have basically nothing of interest. But as the conclusion of that movie, it represented a strike of genius. A video from the scene of Eisenstaedt's photo would be zooming in on faces, pan to the actual puppet performance, show the environment where it's happening and so on. While you are doing this, consentrating on conveying all the action, the quintessential photo may happen while you're not even aware of it.

    Yes, being present was, and still is, an important part of being a good photographer. However, photographers 50 or more years ago had another big "advantage": Their task was to get one, or a few, good photos, and because communication was slower, transportation was slower and life in general happened at a more relaxed pace, they were given more time to capture that photo than what is the case today.

    News photographers today will deliver hundreds or thousands of images from an event, and they will have little influence on which of those photos will be used. Most of the time, they won't even be back at the desk when the choice is made. It will be the picture editor's or the editor's or maybe even a journalist's choice, made on the background of what they think will illustrate the event in the best way, or what suits the publication's political agenda the best. In principle, it's the same process as it was 50 years ago, but it happens much faster now, since photos are often published within minutes of being taken, chosen from thousands, instead of tens, of candidates. The human brain, the one that evaluates those photos, isn't faster than it was though. The greatest photo, the one that conveys what was actually happening the best, may not even have been looked at.

    To me, it seems like news photos 50 years ago, in addition to being reportage, was art on several levels. Today, they look more like design. The difference between art and design is that, while both can be used as decorations, art conveys more than one message, and it may take time and require a thought process from the point of the viewer, to get access to those messages.

    We can discuss till the cows come home if Capa or Eisenstaedt or Cartier-Bresson were good photographers. Some of them, like Capa, were probably mostly brave. But it would be illogical to believe that there weren't good photographers then, at least as many as there are now. The technical differences between now and then also forces another difference: While a photojournalist back then were more or less forced to capture the scene "as is", because he didn't have much equipment to make it look otherwise except maybe a flash, current photographic equipment enables the photographer to "create" reality in a totally different way.

    Take Joey Lawrence for instance. While there's no doubt that he's a very good photographer, his use of artificial lighting and other equipment, and the way he stages and arranges his photos, makes me wonder what he's trying to convey. Reality, it is not. In a way, one can say that he, and many other current photographers, stage their own decisive moments in an alternate reality that resembles the real world, but doesn't reflect it. Not in a way that the photos of Eisenstaedt, Capa or Cartier-Bresson reflected it anyway.

    But as decorations, they are very suitable.

  6. #406
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    Re: D850

    If I photograph a skier flying over a downhill race jump, I can not physically capture “the decisive moment”. I certainly used to try back in the manual camera days. However I can mash the shutter on a modern camera and find an optimal frame during editing.

    I understand that an art house movie not directed by Terrence Malick may have different requirements than a still photo, seems like a pointless analogy?

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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    So, by this diatribe, there is no longer any need or desire for the skilled photographer in the world. Great. All you folks can simply click away while I practice photography ... I no longer need to make a living from photography, I do it for myself.

    G
    Point being that now that the masses can make good photos with ease we’ll have to step up our game to stand out.

    Or take their cameras away so we can revert to only the weathly and skilled having the privilege to make pictures.

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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankly View Post
    If I photograph a skier flying over a downhill race jump, I can not physically capture “the decisive moment”. I certainly used to try back in the manual camera days. However I can mash the shutter on a modern camera and find an optimal frame during editing.

    I understand that an art house movie not directed by Terrence Malick may have different requirements than a still photo, seems like a pointless analogy?
    Sports is a totally different world. The only things that are not predictable are the end results and any accidents. The layout is known, the competitors are known, the time frame is known, both to the photographer and the viewer. I agree that video converted to stills would actually work for many sports, not least for motor sports which I have been photographing for years. This is also one reason why unmanned or remotely operated cameras are frequently used for some sports photography.

  9. #409
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    This thread is obviously taking a turn, but it's a good discussion.

    @Frankly -- I agree that "being there" is half the battle. And taking a still from a movie is essentially what sports photographers have been doing ever since motor-drives were invented

    @Godfrey -- I agree that knowing when to click is half the battle. Of course having 30 (or 60) frames per second to choose from alleviates this to a certain degree... Knowing how to set the camera was definitely a thing back when, as was focusing it properly, but now the cam does both for you, and frankly most of the time better than we can. I see the niche for today's photographer being perspective, framing/focal length and aperture for desired effect --- that's where the art of photography now lies. Okay, need to add in lighting modification whether natural or artificial.
    Heya Jack,

    No intent whatever to take this thread to a turn, personally, but the post I responded to simply struck me as saying "Photography as we knew it is dead." I don't believe that, nor is it what I practice in my photography.

    I know everyone here is all amorous and drooling over bazillions of multiple-gazillion megapixel frames to work with, hypersonic AF and prescient-scale-12 exposure automation with every trick in the book ... but quite honestly, all those things just bore me. I focus my lens. I make my exposure settings. I set up where to shoot from. And then I make my exposure. It's that simple: that's photography to me. The notion of the latest WunderKamera as being the next best thing to the Buddha floating in on his magic carpet leaves me cold. To me, it's a big, heavy, complicated, machine. It has none of the light ease of learning, remembering, and using that even my beloved Nikon F still does. (And yes, I still have that one. ) It's kind of like aiming Darth Vader's Death Star to snap a picture of a tulip... (I hope that image gives you a giggle. )

    I've moved far away from these things. Photography is about seeing, expression, and timing. Not about ISO, pixels, lenses, and all that palaver. No carefully selected frame out of a row of a thousand wannabes will ever give me the sense of satisfaction having seen, caught the expression with my settings and timing, that a single snap at the right moment with a box brownie does.

    As I said, I no longer need to sell my photographs for my income. I don't have to do anything for my income any more, other than stay alive to receive my checks. I do photography for the joy of it, to share my seeing and my photographs with other photographers and artists who see more than pixels, lenses, etcetera. I stay out of discussions of the latest trends in the photography business because it's no longer my world. I'm branching into doing short art motion stuff, just for fun and because it intrigues me now.

    I'll keep doing, and evolving, my photography the same way I always have. And please pardon what I thought might be an amusing jest at ourselves.

    G

    "To see the light and wonder at it, to capture a moment and make a heart sing."
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankly View Post
    Point being that now that the masses can make good photos with ease we’ll have to step up our game to stand out.
    Or take their cameras away so we can revert to only the weathly and skilled having the privilege to make pictures.
    You've likely already seen my response to Jack.

    I no longer need to stand out with my photography.
    I simply need to make photographs that please me, and maybe another couple of people who like to look at my photographs...

    G



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    Re: D850

    I keep coming back to this thread hoping to read something relevant about the D850. By the latest postings I see that is not going to happen.
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnBrew View Post
    I keep coming back to this thread hoping to read something relevant about the D850. By the latest postings I see that is not going to happen.
    Oh, but the D850 is sooooo 2018, and photography is dead anyway... or was that film?

    Jokes aside, maybe a good idea to get back on track. Has anybody here used the D850 long enough to say anything about how it's an improvement over the D810?

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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    Heya Jack,

    No intent whatever to take this thread to a turn, personally, but the post I responded to simply struck me as saying "Photography as we knew it is dead." I don't believe that, nor is it what I practice in my photography.

    I know everyone here is all amorous and drooling over bazillions of multiple-gazillion megapixel frames to work with, hypersonic AF and prescient-scale-12 exposure automation with every trick in the book ... but quite honestly, all those things just bore me. I focus my lens. I make my exposure settings. I set up where to shoot from. And then I make my exposure. It's that simple: that's photography to me. The notion of the latest WunderKamera as being the next best thing to the Buddha floating in on his magic carpet leaves me cold. To me, it's a big, heavy, complicated, machine. It has none of the light ease of learning, remembering, and using that even my beloved Nikon F still does. (And yes, I still have that one. ) It's kind of like aiming Darth Vader's Death Star to snap a picture of a tulip... (I hope that image gives you a giggle. )

    I've moved far away from these things. Photography is about seeing, expression, and timing. Not about ISO, pixels, lenses, and all that palaver. No carefully selected frame out of a row of a thousand wannabes will ever give me the sense of satisfaction having seen, caught the expression with my settings and timing, that a single snap at the right moment with a box brownie does.

    As I said, I no longer need to sell my photographs for my income. I don't have to do anything for my income any more, other than stay alive to receive my checks. I do photography for the joy of it, to share my seeing and my photographs with other photographers and artists who see more than pixels, lenses, etcetera. I stay out of discussions of the latest trends in the photography business because it's no longer my world. I'm branching into doing short art motion stuff, just for fun and because it intrigues me now.

    I'll keep doing, and evolving, my photography the same way I always have. And please pardon what I thought might be an amusing jest at ourselves.

    G

    "To see the light and wonder at it, to capture a moment and make a heart sing."
    Rainy, Lazy Day: https://youtu.be/75K3Wl8dGG4
    Godfrey,

    great words and great thoughts - i really wish I would have been the one writing this. Had similar thoughts lately but could not really formulate what you have done in such a perfect way. This is also one of the reasons I lust of going back to the Leica M as this camera really forces - at least me - to think out of the box to take extraordinary pictures.

    I also don't sell any photographs (at least I could not make a living out of this) and so I can concentrate on what pleases me. In times where all cameras need to do everything including perfect 4k video with all different kind of bitrates and color depth at up to thousands of FPS and also easily mountable to drones so one can add that Hollywood-look to your videos intermixed with iconic photos that were taken directly out of the video - I think I am getting way enough of that trend. Do I need video - sure to film some memories from my daughter or my grown up kids or their friends, but that's it!

    I am no filmmaker and I do not want to be - I AM A PHOTOGRAPHER that occasionally needs to make some video - PERIOD!!!!

    And for that a camera and technique that makes me think before I take the shot is what I need. Plus for me 24MP are already plenty enough - be it from m43, Leica FF or Nikon FF or any APSC camera.

    So once again many thanks for reminding (me and maybe also many others) of the roots of good photography - and also this discussion is VERY OT in this thread I do hope that most reading through this will appreciate these musings ..... because these are the essentials why we finally do photograph.
    Life is an ever changing journey
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by ptomsu View Post
    Godfrey,

    great words and great thoughts - i really wish I would have been the one writing this. Had similar thoughts lately but could not really formulate what you have done in such a perfect way. This is also one of the reasons I lust of going back to the Leica M as this camera really forces - at least me - to think out of the box to take extraordinary pictures.

    I also don't sell any photographs (at least I could not make a living out of this) and so I can concentrate on what pleases me. In times where all cameras need to do everything including perfect 4k video with all different kind of bitrates and color depth at up to thousands of FPS and also easily mountable to drones so one can add that Hollywood-look to your videos intermixed with iconic photos that were taken directly out of the video - I think I am getting way enough of that trend. Do I need video - sure to film some memories from my daughter or my grown up kids or their friends, but that's it!

    I am no filmmaker and I do not want to be - I AM A PHOTOGRAPHER that occasionally needs to make some video - PERIOD!!!!

    And for that a camera and technique that makes me think before I take the shot is what I need. Plus for me 24MP are already plenty enough - be it from m43, Leica FF or Nikon FF or any APSC camera.

    So once again many thanks for reminding (me and maybe also many others) of the roots of good photography - and also this discussion is VERY OT in this thread I do hope that most reading through this will appreciate these musings ..... because these are the essentials why we finally do photograph.
    I shot my best pics with old school technology and inferior electronics. Yet there seems to be no escape from the "upgrading to the newest and best" hamster wheel. M9 and "focus tracking", i.e. called zone focusing in the old days.
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  15. #415
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    Re: D850

    I have never sold one photograph. That might be a reflection on my end product, or the fact that it has always been hobby for me. Since about the late 70s.

    If my finances would permit, I would buy the latest and the best. Not coz of need but want. I would still not sell any photographs. It is still a hobby for me.

    The strange thing, though, is that whenever I have progressed to a newer model
    Of a camera, I still spend the same amount of time before pressing the shutter, as I did long time ago...when i learned what photography was all about.

    My D70, e.g, was excellent. I found that I was limited by its high ISO performance. Of course, a tripod could have alleviated some of these issues.
    Or a flash. But I am not averse to these aids.

    Should I still be carrying a wooden tripod or a light weight carbon fiber one.
    I still spend more time looking and envisioning than pressing the shutter.

    The last camera I bought was the Fuji X-pro2.
    Miraculously, I discovered that I could set it to all manual, and I was back with my
    Spotmatic.

    The Df, similarly, I can set to all manual.

    I am sure, the next bang whiz that might buy, I can still set to manual.

    Enjoy my photography...of course that is why I do it.

    Whether in manual or full auto.

    Nothing has changed for me...except that iso 6400 is a blessing for a lazy old man with shaky hands.

    Having the latest in no way should not allow one not to practice and enjoy the essence of different genres of photography.

    I had 2 sets of cameras and lenses with me, when I went to meet the locals..so to speak....

    Like has been observed, better to click with the subject...than with your camera.
    I am all for clicking with the subject. I enjoy my photography, but I enjoy my subjects more...

    My iPhone was enough. Allowed me more time with my vision.

    koffee & kamera
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  16. #416
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    Re: D850

    My D850 is arriving next week !
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    Re: D850

    One of my most favorite shots ever. Nikon 8008 early AF film body with first 24/f2.8 AF, which was arguably a POS lens. Shot on Velvia rated at ISO 40. Aperture was f8, for this in-cam double exposure. First exposure at sunset for sunset sky, second exposure 2 hours later after sunset and after full moon rise -- a 2 hour exposure -- which provided some fill and time to do the following: secondary fill on casino exterior from portable Nikon strobe and old-school flashlight -- very warm CT -- used inside building to paint interior walls for the kerosene light effect. Due to timing and double-exposure requirement, I got exactly one chance to create this:




    Another favorite, this one done all newer school and higher tech, Phase IQ 180 with 55mm lens. (True story -- I was shoulder to shoulder with about 50 other photographers I didn't know at Tunnel View, all were standing around gabbing about gear waiting for the "magic light to happen" when I snapped 2 or 3 frames either side of this one -- the clouds parted and closed over the course of maybe a minute. Yet I saw nobody else exposing, apparently they weren't even looking... I left them all there, still talking and waiting while I drove off knowing I'd gotten it. Seriously.) :




    Another favorite, this one done really old school with a 4x5 view cam and 150mm lens and Provia IIRC. Nothing special, just in Yosemite on a winter morning with a camera discovering movements -- a wee bit of rise and a wee bit of tilt...:



    ...


    ...


    ...


    And I'm not even certain what my point is with this post... I've created my art with some of the best gear available; and at the same time created some of my best art with gear that by all accounts is total crap by current standards, and others essentially antiques. Perhaps I'm just tired of chasing the latest and greatest in gear, and yearn to get back to creating art with whatever tool I happen to own...

    Carry on without me, I am tired.
    Last edited by Jack; 2 Days Ago at 06:08.
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  18. #418
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    Re: D850

    Thanks for the above posting, Jack - you really hit a home run.

    Stunning set of images - very valid points - which echo my own sentiment.


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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    One of my most favorite shots ever. Nikon 8008 early AF film body, first 24/f2.8 AF lens, which was arguably a POS lens. Shot on Velvia rated at ISO 40. Aperture was f8, for this in-cam double exposure. First exposure at sunset for sunset sky, second exposure 2 hours later after sunset and after full moon rise -- a 2 hour exposure -- which provided some fill and time to do the following: secondary fill on casino exterior from portable Nikon strobe and old-school flashlight -- very warm CT -- used inside building to paint interior walls for the kerosene light effect. Due to timing and double-exposure requirement, I got exactly one chance to create this:




    .
    One of my all time favorites. Used to adorn the front page (homepage) of getdpi.
    Did not know what went into making it!

    Thanks for the information, Jack!
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  20. #420
    Workshop Member ptomsu's Avatar
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    And I'm not even certain what my point is with this post... I've created my art with some of the best gear available; and at the same time created some of my best art with gear that by all accounts is total crap by current standards, and others essentially antiques. Perhaps I'm just tired of chasing the latest and greatest in gear, and yearn to get back to creating art with whatever tool I happen to own...

    Carry on without me, I am tired.
    Jack,

    You speak from my heart, very similar for me too, I am tired!

    Issue is that I still am waking up from time to time and then it always takes some effort to come to this conclusion again.

  21. #421
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    ... I've created my art with some of the best gear available; and at the same time created some of my best art with gear that by all accounts is total crap by current standards, and others essentially antiques. Perhaps I'm just tired of chasing the latest and greatest in gear, and yearn to get back to creating art with whatever tool I happen to own...

    Carry on without me, I am tired.
    Lovely photos, Jack, thanks for showing them.
    I understand.

    (bolded) This is the good part. You don't need anything to create fine art; we don't need anything, most of us. We have everything we need. So lets get on with that and forget the GAS chase.

    onwards,

    G

    "Equipment is transitory. Photographs endure."
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post

    dremaningfull...
    thorkil
    (and simplicity is just an ongoing dream..)

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    Re: D850

    Jack Wrote--->>>"And I'm not even certain what my point is with this post... I've created my art with some of the best gear available; and at the same time created some of my best art with gear that by all accounts is total crap by current standards, and others essentially antiques. Perhaps I'm just tired of chasing the latest and greatest in gear, and yearn to get back to creating art with whatever tool I happen to own..."<<<

    What it always come back to, is that it's the photographer/artist and their vision, insight and talent that makes a great image than most anything else. When we get lost in an image out of shear interest, for a few seconds or longer, regardless of the subject matter, we rarely first ask, what equipment was utilized. For myself, that is the hallmark of an image well done, with thought and creativity. Afterwards might come the interest in the technical aspects. There's no hard and fast rule to all this of course and different subject matter holds interest for different people. Yet a well crafted image or alternatively capturing a decisive moment that immediately stimulates the viewer, is generally a successful photograph and for which we've seen taken with equipment at all levels throughout the many decades of the past.

    Dave (D&A)
    Last edited by D&A; 2 Days Ago at 08:52.
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    Senior Subscriber Member Steen's Avatar
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by ptomsu View Post

    (...) me too, I am tired (...)


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    Re: D850

    Here is a suggestion- to harness all the strong feelings expressed here- why not start an old gear thread? Over at the sony section there is a thread for using old lenses. Like that make it an old gear thread. No new cameras allowed.
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Vivek View Post
    Here is a suggestion- to harness all the strong feelings expressed here- why not start an old gear thread? Over at the sony section there is a thread for using old lenses. Like that make it an old gear thread. No new cameras allowed.
    Why not do something even more radical, like start a section about photographs where you get to post and discuss one photograph per thread, with no irrelevant blah-blah-blah about camera, lens, bytes, etc? What is the title of the photograph, what was your intent in making it, how did you go about it, what problems did you encounter, what do the viewers think about it, how could it be improved, etc?

    An "old gear thread" is just another gearhead discussion rather than anything to do with photography. All gear threads become Old Gear threads the moment your new WunderKamera is put to use.

    G
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    Re: D850

    Looks like my proposal is misrepresented and turned down.

    Sure, make a section based on the “radical” suggestion. Quite a few such sections have already been created and provide platform for low or no contributions.

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    Re: D850

    just a Nikon FF mirrorless for me, lovely viewfinder, modest Mp, simple menu's, high iso-ability like the Df and just one lens, a 24mm with aperture-ring with figures (not by wire!) and oldschool focus-ring, depth of field with decent zonefocus ability, then I'm on
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  29. #429
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    Re: D850

    This thread has gone so far off base it isn't funny. it's supposed to be about the D850 !
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by DougDolde View Post
    This thread has gone so far off base it isn't funny. it's supposed to be about the D850 !
    I agree, although I'm one of the sinners who have contributed to the off topic trend. I think there are some good reasons why we're off topic though:

    - The camera isn't yet widely available. Here in Thailand, where I asume it's manufactured, it isn't available at all yet.
    - Even if it were available, and even if it's the best alround camera in the world, its predecessors, the D800/E and in particular the D810, are so good that many hesitate to upgrade. The philosophical and practical reasons for that are what we see reflected in this thread.

    It's tempting to compare with the Panasonic G9 thread, which is very on topic. In spite of being the sister camera to the GH5 with the same sensor, more or less the same size and with many similar specs, the Panasonic is a major breakthrough for that company when it comes to advanced cameras marketed towards stills photographers. So, people are upgrading from other Panasonic cameras and other brands and "side grading" from the GH5. Although the camera has only been available for a few days, many are posting images and describing their experiences.

    I notice also that the shops where I buy cameras hasn't listed a single D810 body for sale the last 6 or so months, which is unusual when the new model has been launched. One can always question if describing why many people are not upgrading yet is off or on topic, but it's certainly an interesting aspect of the situation. The D850 is clear proof that DSLR technology hasn't reached its peak yet, and probably never will, but the fact that the upgrade isn't really needed by many, at least not urgently, will mean a distinct change in the DSLR market and how Nikon plans ahead.

    Sorry if you feel that this too is off topic, but I thought it sould be mentioned. My upgrade from the D610 that I currently use will probably be a used D810... if I can find one locally.
    Things I sell: https://www.shutterstock.com/g/epixx?language=en
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    D850


    Oh, sorry

    I have enjoyed the nice and interesting chat while waiting for the body-only version to become available in my country

    (and worse, in my case awaiting that I can actually afford it)

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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    I no longer need to make a living from photography, I do it for myself.
    I am not sure I would know what to do with my self if it were just a hobby, it would be like dying to me, a prison born of lack of purpose.

    The life I have lived, the places I have been to and the people I have met because of the freedom I have had from living a life in the fullest behind a camera, I would not trade it for anything.

    I love what I do, I will not work a day in my life.

  33. #433
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    Re: D850

    Quote Originally Posted by DougDolde View Post
    This thread has gone so far off base it isn't funny. it's supposed to be about the D850 !
    So Doug... are you going to cancel/refund your D850 order and build a pinhole camera to cleanse your artistic soul?

    I’m always amused by how conservative and puritanical “creative” people can be. Save your money and buy a nice camera and you might as well be a modern day Hester Prynne.
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  34. #434
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    Re: D850

    One of he reasons I probably would not upgrade from a D810 is that this camera is much quieter (the shutter) than the new D850. The D850 shutter sound is back up to the annoying click clack of Nikon ....
    Life is an ever changing journey
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