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Thread: VR Question

  1. #1
    Senior Member simonclivehughes's Avatar
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    VR Question

    I posted this to the "Destinations" forum, but no answers. Since it is Nikon related, I'm reposting here:


    My wife and I are doing one of the re-positioning cruises from Vancouver to Ketchikan, AK and then back to Seattle. I'm going to take my two D300s and assorted glass. My question relates to using VR lenses on a monopod/tripod while on the ship (one of the big Princess ships). What kind of vibrations should I anticipate and will VR help, and if so, what VR mode is best?

    I'll also be doing a "Misty Fiords" boat trip on a much smaller vessel and I have the same question for that. My main lenses will be the 12-24mm, the 18-200mm and the 70-300 (the later two having VR). I'll also be using my 300 f4 w/1.4 for long reach so I'd like to use the monopod to help out there and it doesn't have VR.

    Any tips or tricks and things to watch for or watch out for on this trip would be welcome.

    Cheers,

  2. #2
    Bill Wilby
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    Re: VR Question

    Simon, I can't help you with your questions but when ever I hear of someone cruising by my home town of Alert Bay I ask them to give my mother a wave. South end of the island green house on the top of the hill, some people call it Wilby Hill. My mother has lived at the top of the hill for the last 60 years. Bill

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    Senior Member atanabe's Avatar
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    Re: VR Question

    Simon,
    When cruising on a boat, tripods or monopods work against you as the vibrations from the ship's engine and the waves vibrate straight through the tripod to the camera. A useful alternative is a bean bag that you can put on the rail of the boat and rest your lens or camera on. In a pinch, a rolled up sweatshirt or seat cushion can also work to isolate the boat's vibrations from your camera and you can let the VR work adjusting to the motion of the boat only. I would suggest that you use a higher than normal shutter speed to limit the motion effects.

    Good luck! I will most likely see your ship dock in Seattle.

    Al
    Al Tanabe my website https://www.altanabe.com

  4. #4
    Senior Member simonclivehughes's Avatar
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    Re: VR Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Wilby View Post
    Simon, I can't help you with your questions but when ever I hear of someone cruising by my home town of Alert Bay I ask them to give my mother a wave. South end of the island green house on the top of the hill, some people call it Wilby Hill. My mother has lived at the top of the hill for the last 60 years. Bill
    Bill,

    I'll be sure to do this if I remember!

    Quote Originally Posted by atanabe View Post
    Simon,
    When cruising on a boat, tripods or monopods work against you as the vibrations from the ship's engine and the waves vibrate straight through the tripod to the camera. A useful alternative is a bean bag that you can put on the rail of the boat and rest your lens or camera on. In a pinch, a rolled up sweatshirt or seat cushion can also work to isolate the boat's vibrations from your camera and you can let the VR work adjusting to the motion of the boat only. I would suggest that you use a higher than normal shutter speed to limit the motion effects.

    Good luck! I will most likely see your ship dock in Seattle.

    Al
    Al,

    Thanks for the advice. I was pretty sure that would be the case, especially on a smaller craft, but I wondered how much the large cruise ship would act as a "sink" to engine vibration. Lazy me is trying to find a way to not have to heft the weight of the camera/lens combo all the time.

    Cheers,

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    Senior Member atanabe's Avatar
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    Re: VR Question

    Simon,
    With VR and higher shutter speeds you can probably get away with most things on a bigger boat. I shot with 100 ISO Astia and no VR but got keepers, you just have to know how much you can push it. With digital you at least have an immediate feedback for your combinations.

    Regards,
    Al
    Al Tanabe my website https://www.altanabe.com

  6. #6
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    Re: VR Question

    i thought VR sensed when the camera was on a tripod and turns off or won't work. could be wrong, maybe thinking of canon.

  7. #7
    Senior Member ecsh's Avatar
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    Re: VR Question

    No, its either switched on or off on Nikon lens.
    Joe

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    Re: VR Question

    i just remembered, that i shoot off boats every year, except not this year due lack of surf. these are rocking, rolling, vibrating, large fishing boats positioned right off the 35-40 foot swells at Mavericks. (this requires downing a handful of sea sickness pills and results in quite a hangover) i mostly use the 70-200 on a D3 and sometimes also a 300 2.8 on a second camera. secret to success is high shutter speed and try not to fall off the boat. all hand held to avoid vibration. shots are good enough for mags and agencies, so it works. i leave the vr off since i use a high speed.
    Last edited by fultonpics; 6th June 2009 at 20:29.

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