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Thread: B&W printing

  1. #1
    Senior Member JBurnett's Avatar
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    B&W printing

    Originally posted in the 4/3 forum, but I'm sure there is expertise to tap in to here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Diane B View Post
    It would be a beautiful print.
    The suggestion of a print reminds me that I'm still trying to decide what to do about B&W prints. My Epson R800 has never been consistent for B&W, and it's limited in size of course (8.5 x 11"). I don't print a lot, but when I do, I'm looking for very good quality. So, what to do? DIY or service? Epson ABW (eg. 3880)? Service giclee? Piezography (K7 inks) at home (dedicated printer) or via service? Ilford "true" B&W at a service? Lamda fibre print?

    Oh, BTW, most prints would be 12 x 18 or less, but the occasional print would be up to 16 x 20.
    Best regards,
    John.
    http://jburnett.ca

  2. #2
    richard.L
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    Re: B&W printing

    wading in to the endless "best" ...
    there exists a list for digital BW : http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/D...WhiteThePrint/

    there is the Epson 1400, often used by DIY BW and with discounts: http://www.atlex.com/Epson/SP1400-80-EA210-C34480.pdf


    there is Paul Roark's inksets (see listserv above for ongoing info)
    the simple approach uses preloaded cartridges from : http://www.inksupply.com/ut14_black_and_white.cfm

    there are other things, but this can get you started within several hours, and a few hundred dollars.

    branching further into the forest means mixing your own inks, to print onto regular printmakers paper....

    richard with a different brown stain than amidol.

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    Re: B&W printing

    Quote Originally Posted by JBurnett View Post
    Originally posted in the 4/3 forum, but I'm sure there is expertise to tap in to here.

    The suggestion of a print reminds me that I'm still trying to decide what to do about B&W prints. My Epson R800 has never been consistent for B&W, and it's limited in size of course (8.5 x 11"). I don't print a lot, but when I do, I'm looking for very good quality. So, what to do? DIY or service? Epson ABW (eg. 3880)? Service giclee? Piezography (K7 inks) at home (dedicated printer) or via service? Ilford "true" B&W at a service? Lamda fibre print?

    Oh, BTW, most prints would be 12 x 18 or less, but the occasional print would be up to 16 x 20.
    I've been printing uo to 13x19 inch paper with an Epson R2400 since 2005 using a color-managed workflow on Epson, Hahnemuhle and other fine art, matte papers. It's archival, prints with high fidelity to the screen, and is consistent and reasonably priced. ABW works very nicely if you don't want to bother with the full color managed business.

    I have never had a client or gallery owner make any negative comment regards technical quality of the prints ...

    If you don't print a heck of a lot and 12x18 inch or smaller is your target, the new Epson 3000 or the well-proven R3880 would be just about perfect.

  4. #4
    Senior Member JBurnett's Avatar
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    Re: B&W printing

    Quote Originally Posted by richard.L View Post
    there is the Epson 1400, often used by DIY BW and with discounts: http://www.atlex.com/Epson/SP1400-80-EA210-C34480.pdf
    Thanks for the links, Richard. The current cost of the 1400 makes it an attractive option to try B&W-only printing.
    Best regards,
    John.
    http://jburnett.ca

  5. #5
    Senior Member JBurnett's Avatar
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    Re: B&W printing

    Quote Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
    I've been printing uo to 13x19 inch paper with an Epson R2400 since 2005 using a color-managed workflow on Epson, Hahnemuhle and other fine art, matte papers. It's archival, prints with high fidelity to the screen, and is consistent and reasonably priced. ABW works very nicely if you don't want to bother with the full color managed business.

    I have never had a client or gallery owner make any negative comment regards technical quality of the prints ...

    If you don't print a heck of a lot and 12x18 inch or smaller is your target, the new Epson 3000 or the well-proven R3880 would be just about perfect.
    Thanks for responding, Godfrey. It helps to know that photographers who exhibit and sell prints are using and satisfied with the 3880. In some ways this option makes the most sense for me because I'm likely going to have to purchase a larger format colour printer in any event.
    Best regards,
    John.
    http://jburnett.ca

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    Re: B&W printing

    Quote Originally Posted by JBurnett View Post
    Thanks for responding, Godfrey. It helps to know that photographers who exhibit and sell prints are using and satisfied with the 3880. In some ways this option makes the most sense for me because I'm likely going to have to purchase a larger format colour printer in any event.
    You're welcome.

    Having been through the "quad tone inks" and other B&W printing processes with the dye-based siblings (predecessors) of the Epson 1400, I strongly recommend against it. The problem isn't that it can't work; it's that it is very difficult to get consistency. And clogging with the third party inks was always a problem.

    The Epson K3 inkset used in the R2400, R2880, R3000, R3800, R3880, etc all include the correct Light Light Black, Light Black and Photo Black/Matte Black inks to do top notch printing straight out of the box. Profiles for most all papers are available easily. The inks are all pigment based with state of the art archival stability. Clogging problems are mostly non-existent.

    Spending $800 on the R2400 in 2005 probably saved me a few thousand dollars over the years in wasted ink and paper, and who knows how much time... :-)

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