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Thread: Ricoh GX100

  1. #401
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    That is an excellent site Simon. I had a good read.
    In the meantime I finished my writing and posted it on my blog.

    I use Adobe Lightroom to convert my photographs. Instead of using the Grayscale option in the Develop module I desaturate my photograph with the saturation sliders dragging to the left in the HSL panel. Then I adjust the color sliders with the Target adjustment tool in the Luminance panel. That way you can darken or brighten color area's in your photograph. That way you can preserve a lot gradation and tonalities. To enhance the contrast I use the Camera Calibration panel and the Tone Curve.


  2. #402
    Member MisiekBunnik's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thanks Wouter, what better way to start saturdaymorning, reading your article and having a cup of coffee next to it (I drink it black whit a bit of white)

  3. #403
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    WOUTER .....
    FAB
    JUST LOVE IT !!

    Cheers- H

  4. #404
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Nicely written Wouter. I was holding off sharing my methods to see what you wrote. I teach a very similar method on the workshops, but do a few things differently. First, like you, I do not use the grayscale conversion in LR, but de-saturate. A step I add is next bumping contrast up pretty significantly. Then I adjust exposure, recovery and fill to taste (usually needed after the contrast bump), then if I feel the need for a further tweak (I don't very often) I can hit the luminance sliders to adjust tonal response. Did not ever try the camera adjustments trick though -- very clever!

    Cheers,
    Jack
    home: www.getdpi.com

    "Perfection is not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence."

  5. #405
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thank you Guy's! I really wanted to finish the writing for this weekend.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flesher View Post
    Nicely written Wouter. I was holding off sharing my methods to see what you wrote. I teach a very similar method on the workshops, but do a few things differently. First, like you, I do not use the grayscale conversion in LR, but de-saturate. A step I add is next bumping contrast up pretty significantly. Then I adjust exposure, recovery and fill to taste (usually needed after the contrast bump), then if I feel the need for a further tweak (I don't very often) I can hit the luminance sliders to adjust tonal response. Did not ever try the camera adjustments trick though -- very clever!

    Cheers,
    Thank you Jack! Lightroom is still full of suprises. The luminance panel can be used as a channel mixer in Photoshop. But with much greater control and better usability too (with the Target adjustment tool).

    According to one of the comments on my blog the grayscale option in Lightroom had a bug. Adjusting the color sliders in the Grayscale panel resulted in a noisier image. The desaturate method was a kind of workaround. It should have been fixed in version 1.4, but I still think it is too limiting and you can still get noisy images (I use version 1.4.1). Desaturating and adjusting the luminance in combination with the Camera Calibration is still my favorite method to convert photographs to B&W in Lightroom.

    I am currently working on Develop presets for Lightroom to recreate the looks of B&W films like Kodak TRI-X, T-MAX, or Ilford HP5.

  6. #406
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    I started a new topic in the Image Processing Forum about this B&W conversion technique in Lightroom. Maybe it would be a good idea to share our methods and comments there for converting our photographs to B&W (not only Lightroom, but also other applications like Photoshop or Aperture).

  7. #407
    Super Duper
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Wouter,
    Brilliant, in every way, image!
    And a very interesting article as well.
    Almost enough to make me jump whole heartedly into PP
    Hmmmmm Lightroom is not that costly after all.
    And if I do so the slow RAW write time on the my GRD First Gen would allow me to justify getting a GX100 plus those prices are dropping....
    Sigh, the Devil is at my shoulder....

  8. #408
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    LiLi
    I think 'POPFLASH'
    has the GX100 for $427.00 (notice how I'm spending your MONEY )


    Best- H:
    Last edited by helenhill; 31st May 2008 at 07:46.

  9. #409
    Senior Member Robert Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thanks Wouter for this; I tried it, and even I was impressed with the results - and it is very straightforward.
    Sláinte

    Robert.

  10. #410
    Senior Member Robert Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    Hmmmmm Lightroom is not that costly after all.
    And very easy to use...go on, try it
    Sláinte

    Robert.

  11. #411
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    I am still very impressed with the GX-100's ability as a compact street photography camera. I find the 24mm lens especially helpful to get things in frame, as I often shoot from the hip and guess the framing. Here are a few from this week.

    Bearded transvestite in Greenwich Village:


    A very Puerto Rican building in my neighborhood:

    An anti-smoking graffiti wall in my neighborhood:

    I just found this funny...a portly guy smoking in front of a NYC quits anti-smoking poster and a "make healthy choices" sign.

    Some local schoolkids going to recess

  12. #412
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Campbell View Post
    Thanks Wouter for this; I tried it, and even I was impressed with the results - and it is very straightforward.
    That is absolutely great Robert

    And Stuart, great photographs. I really like the second, third and last one.

    Storm Clouds

    Ricoh GX100, f4.8, 1/75 sec, ISO 80, 0.0 EV

  13. #413
    Kiri
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Wow
    Amazing lighting on that storm clouds one. Looks like CG

  14. #414
    scanman
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Richardson View Post
    I am still very impressed with the GX-100's ability as a compact street photography camera. I find the 24mm lens especially helpful to get things in frame, as I often shoot from the hip and guess the framing. Here are a few from this week.
    Agreed with you.
    Most of my pic are at hip level (be it the GX100 or my DSLR)
    Really capture the realism of the subject.

    here some...






  15. #415
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Just to welcome you to the forum and ask a question.I need to be educated over this style of photography as to be honest I see little value in the hip shot way of working,perhaps you could help me to appreciate this "style"as I dont see the photographers involvement in the process and if youre not involved whats the point?Im sure theres more to it than I understand so if you can help Id be grateful,curious,Neil.
    Sorry thought you were a new member so Ill say hello instead!

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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Well, the point is to take a photograph without disturbing the subject or causing them to change their expression, position and so on. Because of that, some people don't like it because it can be "sneaky". I agree that it can be used in a bad way, but I think if your intentions are honorable, it is a valid style. That is, if you are not just taking upskirt photos or photos to embarrass or demean others. If you're approaching things from a positive place, then I think it is a valid style. It is also useful as a way of photographic "sketching". I live in a city where one needs to walk everywhere. I generally carry a camera everywhere, and as I walk about, there are fleeting photographic moments, many which do not wait for you to stop and set up the shot. So many of my hip shots come from just going about my daily life and snapping at the moments as they slide by. If I am out for dedicated street shooting, then I slow down and take more carefully composed shots. Hip shooting for me is sort of like my daily practice.

    The photographer's involvement is just like any other style -- it comes from deciding the moment of capture and deciding the settings used. While composition cannot be exact, it can be quite close. Once you get some practice, framing gets better, but all the other elements remain dependent on the skill of the photographer.

    Here are a few hip shots I have made that I like.


    This was not hip per se, but I just put the camera on the table, roughly gauged the framing, and fired the shutter.




    This would be a happy accident....I intended to get a more full frame photo of this woman in the striped stockings, but the framing was off and the shutter speed too slow for the night. Nevertheless, I think the photo came out well.

  17. #417
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    BTW: the bearded transvestite is quite a famous model.

    Some nice pics Stuart, and a few that, well....

    I find "hip" pics to be exactly that - it looks like the photographer is shooting with their hip, not their eye (which is connected to the head). You'll find in the canon of street photography very few of the successful ones (HCB, Winogrand, Mermelstein come to mind) shot/shoot from the hip. They look and compose and put their head/eye into the photo (and I'm using "head" in the larger sense). There is more often than not a disconnection with hip shooting that is all too obvious. I hesitate to call it laziness - it's more an incompleteness.

    And then with the advent of the compact digital suddenly everybody's a street shooter because there's no risk involved (just point in the general direction and let the camera do the rest - and it's silent! And quickly hidden). But it's the sense of challenge and risk that has always made the best photos. A great example is Bruce Davidson's Subway. I'm not saying everyone needs to put themselves in danger like he did, but there's a human quality and connectedness in those photos I see often lacking today. Not to mention a sense of craft.

    I think the Ricoh looks like a great tool - I just met a photojournalist who plans on taking one into Myanmar with him in order to be discreet.

  18. #418
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Im going to play devils advocate(thanks for taking my comments so well and giving such a good explanation);If I was say a security guard in charge of the cameras watching over a supermarket could I select a few frames and think of them as a creative act on my part,simply because of my act of selection. Believe me I am not about to jump on whatever you say because I believe the guard has a good case.Im just not sure if choosing the moment is enough when using a camera,I at the moment feel the need to compose to the millimeter if possible,but I think the security guard has a good point.hope you will reply,Neil.

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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thank you both for the comments. For what it is worth, only the first photo in the last group I posted was with the GX100...the rest were with a Leica. Anyway, as I explained, this is an exercise for me. It is not my main work. Honestly, it's just something to do as I walk from place to place. But I find it keeps me thinking about photography while I am out and about, and for me, that is a nice advantage. If there are photographers who use it as a sole method of working, then I would imagine they would come to terms with it in a way that allows them to embrace its advantages and minimize its downsides.

    As for the GX100, I don't think it is fundamentally different than other cameras. You choose the focal length, you choose the aperture, and you set the hyperfocal difference. The camera has automatic exposure, but so does the M7, as well as most cameras made in the last 25 years. There have long been quiet, small cameras that photographers have used on the street -- the Leicas, Hexar AF, fixed lens rangefinders like the Olympus XA, or even little SLR's like the OM or Spotmatic. Yes, digital has made it even smaller and quieter, but fundamentally I think they are still regarded as cameras by the people around you.

    Neil -- I am not 100% sure that I understand you, but I do think that many types of photography are essentially about capturing a moment rather than completely constructing it. So in this sense, yes, as long as the security guard chooses an artistically significant moment, I don't think it matters if he does not control the cameras exactly.

  20. #420
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Stuart,I think the construction and the moment are two separet things,its bringing the two together thats difficult,to my mind one without the other is interesting but not great.But then interesting is pretty good.

  21. #421
    Kiri
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Personally I think shooting from the hip is a really interesting form of photography that I often prefer over more conventional ones. Not only does it give a different perspective, but I find the shots to often be much more natural and in a way more 'authentic'. Traditional shooting methods are by their very nature highly constructed. Not that there is anything wrong with that, but I definitely think that shooting from the hip or other similar styles are very valid.

    I guess it depends on your definition of photography or what photography means to you. Whether it is something that you construct as much as possible and aim for 'perfection' in achieving what you imagine the result to be in your head.
    Or whether you try and capture a moment from the world around you just as it is and let that speak for itself.

    I can see the value in both.

  22. #422
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Just because some one looks through the finder means the subject is less authentic and natural? Give me a break. A camera is rendering the subject as something "other" no matter what. It's just that the camera can't think for the photographer. So I guess what you are referring to is taking the thinking out of photographing as being more authentic. That is still a flawed argument because you are still filtering the moment through a "dumb" camera no matter if you are looking through the viewfinder or not. The camera is a filter to authenticness no matter what - it is by it's very nature an unnatural object. Personally I prefer an operator in the seat. IMO it gives the photograph a more authentic vision - that of the photographers.

  23. #423
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Kiri,what your describing is happening around you all the time,without selection there is no point in recording,without deliberate selection there is no art,just a fog of a lack of intent or interest.Possibly what your thinking can be linked to the "punk"philosophy of my youth,something that I was a strong supporter of,the idea that a lack of technical expertise shouldnt stop anyone producing anything they want to,be it music,a painting or a photograph.However the sexpistols did play their instruments in the end and I think a camera should be looked through at some time in the process,all the best,Neil.

  24. #424
    Senior Member pollobarca's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Shooting from the hip is still pointing the camera ,therefore roughly composing, at someone you think interesting but who may not be there if they see you taking the picture.
    My favourite is to stand and fiddle with the camera but actually to
    compose the shot then wait for someone to come in and make it interesting (for me anyway). People normally dont realise you are waiting for them , so they carry on doing what they are doing. I also have the habit of holding my camera at waist or chest height , my old Oly with the flip out screen got me doing this.

    Sneak shots of people as the subject I'm not so keen on . But thats my taste.
    I do like people in my pictures as they make the scene work, for me.
    BTW the japanese schoolgirl (the pretty one) seems to have seen the photographer anyway.

    Heres a sneak shot I got of a colleague during lunch break at the bar. I fiddled with the camera ,on the table, and got this without her realising until she found it on Flickr. She was quite pleased with it.


    A good idea is also to turn off focus assist light- a dead giveaway if it lights up. This happened to me at the Blue Note Milan -the drummer gave me a very dirty look...

    b rgds

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  25. #425
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    I know of people who if they thought a stranger was trying to sneak a photograph of them would smash the camera over the "artists"head,Id tend to agree with the sentiment if not the action.Better to be a little braver I think and face the consequences face on. Ive had the cheek to add a photo to the gallery that maybe illustrates what you think is wrong with photography and what I think is right.
    May all of us go from strength to strength.

  26. #426
    Subscriber Member TRSmith's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Great discussion. If we were sitting together in a room having this talk, it would be easier to get a sense for people's thought process, and maybe a little easier to put forth a thought that wasn't completely developed. Like the one I'm about to stick out here now.

    The distinctions being made between from-the-hip and from-the-eye forced me to consider how feel about the two styles. I instantly flashed back to a recent visit to San Francisco and an afternoon at the MOMA, where I enjoyed the Lee Friedlander exhibit.

    Making those halfways-sideways steps between images on the wall, I would still be chewing (mentally) on the last image while I placed myself in front of the next. Those first few moments of re-focussing my attention on the new image would sort of pass in silence. Then the kernel, or nucleaus, or gist, or pun, or truth (whatever you want to call it) would suddenly bloom in my mind. Ahhhh, now I see!

    The frame edges would melt away and I was, for however long I stood there, absorbed in that clean moment of understanding. A moment masterfully seen and almost invisibly presented. If you were to analyze the composition and tones, etc. you could break it down into lots of things. But in reality, the moment was just as fleeting for Mr. Friedlander as it would have been for me. Except that he processed it all and managed to capture it intuitively. Frikkin' brilliant!

    Those images, and ones like them from so many other great photographers, have a very real impact on me.

    Which is not to say something akin to that can't happen with the shoot-from-the-hip style. Just that it's a great deal more rare. Those SFTH shots are everywhere and they're fun to look at because they often present interesting angles, and tones, and happy juxtapostions. And as a photographer, they can sometimes lead to an insight or line of creative thinking you might not have had otherwise. But rarely, rarely an Ahhhhh! moment.

  27. #427
    Kiri
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Quote Originally Posted by charlesphoto View Post
    Just because some one looks through the finder means the subject is less authentic and natural?
    No.
    Although if you set up a shot and have your subject pose for the photo, (and even if you tell them to "just act naturally", I think a lot of people will still pose to some degree), then I don't know if you could say that they are being totally natural could you?

    You are taking "shooting from the hip" to simply mean changing the point where you shoot from, minus the feedback from the viewfinder. But the point I was making about naturalness is more to do with how people react when you make it clear that you are taking a photo by raising the camera to your eye and setting up the shot.

    Whether you look through the viewfinder or not is not really the issue.
    Yes, looking though the viewfinder will give you more accurate feedback on what you are shooting, and generally this is what you want.
    But, if you shoot from the hip or from any other unorthodox position, you are still selecting what you shoot, and you can still exercise control over all of the camera settings and where you point it can't you?

    I'm not talking about just walking around taking photos aimlessly without any thought as to what you are shooting.

    @nei1: I never suggested that there should be no selection or intent or technical expertise involved in the process. Rather, I would suggest that all these elements are still present.


    Please understand that I am not trying to imply that shooting from the hip is by any means a replacement for traditional shooting methods, nor am I saying that it is better, or that we should all stop looking through the viewfinder. I am simply trying to argue that it CAN be a valid form of photography, and CAN offer a different perspective and the possibility to capture something that you may not have been able to with a conventional approach.

    I do find myself agreeing with what TRSmith said in the previous post.

    Getting the results you want will certainly be rarer when shooting from the hip, but if it brings a different thought process, perspective and even a degree of unpredictability to the art, isn't there some value in that?

  28. #428
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    An interesting discussion. Holding a camera in front of you and aiming it at your subject might not always be the best way. I personally think that Bruce Gilden's method is very offending. See it here.
    Joel Meyerowitz and Jeff Mermelstein have less offending methods, but they both still hold the camera in front of their eyes. There work looks more natural to me. But I also admire our member Chris for his photographs mostly shot from the hips.
    For me in person it is still something you have to feel comfortable with.

    On a different photography note, but all GX100 stuff.


    Ricoh GX100, f4.6, 1/350 sec, ISO 100, -0.7 EV


    Ricoh GX100, f7, 1/1050 sec, ISO 80, -0.7 EV

  29. #429
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    LOVE the first Shot ....Wouter
    The long Pathway that leads to the the Silver Cloud

    Best-H

  30. #430
    praktinafan
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    For me: best method is to "frame" what I see. See first picture.


    If you have the camera between your eyes and the object there is more distance to the object. You hide behind that black box. See picture 2


    To frame by looking down to a tilted screen or a good LCD with greater viewing angle you have the ability to frame the object and NOT to look at it. The chance to take a shot without being recognized as a photographer at work is quite big.


    Shooting from hip or any other place near your body where you can not see what you are framing is for me: coincidence, maybegood, have luck, hope. In the worst case I get the feeling that not it is not me who has taken the photos but anyone else. Unpersonal...

  31. #431
    Chris
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    I can see the point some of you make, that shooting from the hips depends on coincidence or intuition (to put it in a nicer way). But I also think that if you shoot like this regularly, you can get some kind of feeling for it (especially if you use a fixed lens or always the same focal length). Of course, a perfect frame is still dificult. But on the other hand, the chance of not "destroying" a moment is bigger and the low point of view is hard to get from looking through the viewfinder or at the display...
    I agree with Kiri that you can still select in some way if you shoot from the hips. Nevertheless, if I don't want to get that low and I don't think I will "destroy the moment", I prefer to look at the display.

    The discussion about the definition of art is a very hard one as well. I think there are always different grades of control... some musicians who jam sometimes also play what they play without being perfectly conscious before... This does not mean that they play without any intentions or without knowing how to play an instrument.
    And to go even further: should a musician not use a hookline he found by accident (if he wants to play something else but makes a mistakes and finds a new melody)? And I think shooting from the hip can be far away from taking a picture by accident even though we don't have the same grade of control as we would have by looking through the VF or at the display...


    PS: I could finally read your excellent article about b/w conversion, Wouter! Thank you very much! I am really looking foreward to trying this.








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    Last edited by Chris; 10th June 2008 at 21:20.

  32. #432
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    It might help me understand the point of the hip shot if you could explain youre reasons for using this method to obtain the two photos youve chosen to illustrate this style.At first glance they appear to be of a group of children playing in the street and an elderly gentleman on his pushbike.What was there in these situations that brought you to the conclusion that it was best to secretly take the photo without anyone knowing what you were doing?
    Last edited by nei1; 12th June 2008 at 07:36.

  33. #433
    Chris
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Quote Originally Posted by nei1 View Post
    It might help me understand the point of the hip shot if you could explain youre reasons for using this method to obtain the two photos youve chosen to illustrate this style.At first glance they appear to be of a group of children playing in the street and an elderly gentleman on his pushbike.What was there in these situations that brought you to the conclusion that it was best to sneakily take the photo without anyone knowing what you were doing?
    Well, I did not especially choose these pictures to illustrate this style (I just posted them as I post some pictures from time to time)... Anyway, they make the point as well: I would have had to go down (almost on my knees) and I am sure the boys would have changed their expressions (and would have looked at me) and I probably would have interrupted the conversation the man on the bike had with the man with the newspaper and so, they probably would have looked at me as well.
    I don't mind if they notice that I take pictures and if they asked, I would explain them what I am doing. But I prefer that they notice afterwards because if they notice before, I get a different picture (which can be a great one, but not one of the kind I usually search...).
    In the picture of the playing kids, the man behind the boy on the left (the dad of one of the kids) noticed me taking the picture and smiled at me. Many times they notice just in the moment of the picture and I don't mind at all.

    I also try to respect people and not to take pictures of people in a compromising situation.

    _________________________________________________
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    Last edited by Chris; 12th June 2008 at 07:54.

  34. #434
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Nice pics Chris. Too me they don't look at all "from the hip" but very conciously shot.

    It's not the actuality of not looking through the viewfinder that I find bothersome. I just finished a book on breakdancing shot with medium format (Hasselblad SWC and Mamiya 6/7) and I often didn't look through the viewfinder while shooting as I wanted shots from floor level or the action is just too crazy. But I figured out how to frame without the viewfinder, guessing at focus. Not always successfully but after thousands of tries one does get a few!

    What I often see is really lazy pics taken with the excuse that they didn't want their subjects to know. But just by catching the subject unawares doesn't automatically make it a good photograph. To me it's knowing how to compose with (or without) the viewfinder and of course the ability to edit after the fact.
    Ever try and take pics out of a speeding car? Rarely does it render anything useable and I am seeing this sort of attitude happening with the small sensor wide angle crowd. Slow down a bit, compose, stay in one place and let people know what you are doing and they will soon forget about you.

  35. #435
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thanks for the reply Chris,Im trying to put my finger on what it is that worries me about this way of taking pictures.I think its that it opens the door to the acceptance of almost anything,for me personel involvement is everything,the hip style is more detached,less personel but Im glad you enjoy it,all the best,Neil.

  36. #436
    SimonL
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    I think one of the main reasons for the 'hip shot' is the totally different perspective it gives you. I'm 6'2" and I'm sure that, if I allowed it to, the same boring perspective would do me no favours at all.

    Even when I don't strictly need to, I use the right angle finder on my 30D to give a little variety from my normal point of view.

  37. #437
    nei1
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    I dont like photos that look down on people either simon and often end up with anaching back from staying too long on the eyeline of the subject(Im about your height)The angle finder seems like a good idea.

  38. #438
    Kiri
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Quote Originally Posted by charlesphoto View Post
    Nice pics Chris. Too me they don't look at all "from the hip" but very conciously shot.

    It's not the actuality of not looking through the viewfinder that I find bothersome. I just finished a book on breakdancing shot with medium format (Hasselblad SWC and Mamiya 6/7) and I often didn't look through the viewfinder while shooting as I wanted shots from floor level or the action is just too crazy. But I figured out how to frame without the viewfinder, guessing at focus. Not always successfully but after thousands of tries one does get a few!

    What I often see is really lazy pics taken with the excuse that they didn't want their subjects to know. But just by catching the subject unawares doesn't automatically make it a good photograph. To me it's knowing how to compose with (or without) the viewfinder and of course the ability to edit after the fact.
    Ever try and take pics out of a speeding car? Rarely does it render anything useable and I am seeing this sort of attitude happening with the small sensor wide angle crowd. Slow down a bit, compose, stay in one place and let people know what you are doing and they will soon forget about you.


    I completely agree, so I'm not really sure what we were arguing about.


    Great images on your site by the way. I especially like the cypher ones. You really captured the action and mood of the break scene.

  39. #439
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Hi all,

    I've been lurking on the small sensor forum for awhile enjoying the images. I pulled the trigger on a nice used GX-100 a couple of weeks ago and I'm enjoying it all out of proportion to it's price and size.

    Here's an image from the 2nd day of ownership, shot in the skunk cabbage swamp in the woods behind our house. JPEG, converted via PS channel mixer.


  40. #440
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    ...a couple of more:





    The violets and birches were shot using a .6x wide-angle accessory lens from a Canon Super-8 camera (310 xl, fwiw) that happens to have 43mm threads, and that accounts for the soft corners in those pics.

  41. #441
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    FABULOUS Kevin

    Love the Sense of Tonality.......
    Any Tweaking Done ?

    Silly Question here but are you the same 'Kevin' in CT....
    Congrats on the GX 100
    Cheers ! H

  42. #442
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Hi Helen, yes, it's me! Looking forward to the Skopar!

    Nothing fancy here, just selective burning, dodging and sharpening.

  43. #443
    Senior Member Joan's Avatar
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Nice ones, Kevin. Love the frog, he is so nifty tucked in there. Beautiful conversions.

    Welcome aboard!
    Regards,
    Joan

  44. #444
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thanks, Joan. The frog was kind enough to move into the good light.

  45. #445
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    What a fantastic photographs to jump aboard Kevin! Welcome here and keep on posting more photographs from the GX100.


    Ricoh GX100, f4.6, 1/35 sec, ISO 100, -0.7 EV


    Ricoh GX100, f6.5, 1/750 sec, ISO 80, -0.3 EV


    Ricoh GX100, f4.1, 1/950 sec, ISO 80, -0.3 EV


    Ricoh GX100, f4.1, 1/950 sec, ISO 80, -0.3 EV

  46. #446
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thanks to the North Sea we can enjoy beautiful cloud formations here in the Netherlands.


    Ricoh GX100, f5.7, 1/1400 sec, ISO 80, -0.3 EV


    Ricoh GX100, f3.6, 1/1000 sec, ISO 80, 0.0 EV


    Ricoh GX100, f4.6, 1/1400 sec, ISO 80, -0.3 EV

  47. #447
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Those are superb Wouter!

  48. #448
    wbrandsma
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    Thank you Stuart

  49. #449
    Kiri
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    GX100 in low light conditions

    I'm just wondering if any of the GX100 users here have any tips for using this camera in low light conditions?
    I find that to get a reasonably sharp shot I have to keep the shutter speed fairly high, and so have to compensate by raising the ISO to 800. Unfortunately that does often introduce quite a lot of noise into the image...

    Does anyone here have any good strategies when shooting or in post processing to get clear images with minimum noise in low light situations?

    thanks

  50. #450
    praktinafan
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    Re: Ricoh GX100

    @kiri: I would use a good stand, ISO 80, long shutter time, remote release or timer. And RAW, of course.

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