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Thread: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

  1. #1
    Sean_Reid
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    Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    I just got an e-mail from Ricoh Japan that they're sending me the 40 adapter by Fedex so I may have it tomorrow and will then post some initial impressions.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  2. #2
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Sean, I'm all ears on this one...

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  3. #3
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    me too!

  4. #4
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    They Fedex'd it from Japan, so it should arrive today, but they forgot the connector piece so that should be here Monday.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  5. #5
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    We're all counting on u Sean to give us your as usual unbiased opinion. I would expect that the adapter needs to be removed each time the camera is turned off. Also, how obstrusive is the assembly?? Does the camera lose some effectiveness as a stealthy street camera??

    Thanks.

    Martin




    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    They Fedex'd it from Japan, so it should arrive today, but they forgot the connector piece so that should be here Monday.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  6. #6
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    I just got an e-mail from Ricoh Japan that they're sending me the 40 adapter by Fedex so I may have it tomorrow and will then post some initial impressions.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Sean,

    I always look forward to your reviews. I have been looking for a high quality small sensor camera for a while. Most of them have fatal flaws. One of the most annoying is the lack of a RAW buffer. (I bought a Pan LC1 from you a long while back and loved the camera and it's output. I agree with you that the LC1 and the Digilux 2 have some of the best file quality in a small sensor camera. But the size and the 6 sec RAW write times were hard to get past.) I would look seriously at the GX100 but for the RAW write times.

    Anyway, I really overlooked the GRD because of the 28mm lens. It is just too wide for my everyday use. But with the GRDII I am rethinking this. The RAW buffer and the addition of the 40mm adapter are exciting updates worth a look.

    I look forward to your review and impressions of the adapter. I am hoping that lens quality and camera size and weight do not suffer too badly when using it. It would be on the GRDII most of the time for me.


    Thanks,
    Chuck A

  7. #7
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Hi Chuck,

    Thanks, I'm very glad to hear that. As you probably remember, that 6 second write time was the primary reason I sold that camera. Fedex tried to deliver the accessory lens today but missed me. I also need the mounting collar thing to arrive before I can try things out. But soon, hopefully. Christmas will be busy because we've got a lot of people coming - so scheduling any testing could be tricky.

    I think an important thing to sort out is how the GR2, with and without the accessory lens, compares to the GX-100.

    Best,

    Sean

  8. #8
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin S View Post
    We're all counting on u Sean to give us your as usual unbiased opinion. I would expect that the adapter needs to be removed each time the camera is turned off. Also, how obstrusive is the assembly?? Does the camera lose some effectiveness as a stealthy street camera??

    Thanks.

    Martin
    Hi Martin,

    I wouldn't think that it would need to be removed at all. I imagine it could stay on all the time if desired.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  9. #9
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Martin:

    I don't yet have the 40mm converter lens, but it works the same way as the 21mm one, which means that it can stay on the camera permanently if you wish, and, of course the camera can be switched on or off.

    I think the "stealth" aspect is usually overstated: it's not that people don't see you photographing, it's that they don't you seriously with this camera; with the converter lens the camera is small enough that that doesn't change.

    —Mitch/Bangkok

  10. #10
    chris_tribble
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck A View Post
    Sean,

    Anyway, I really overlooked the GRD because of the 28mm lens. It is just too wide for my everyday use. But with the GRDII I am rethinking this. The RAW buffer and the addition of the 40mm adapter are exciting updates worth a look.

    Chuck A
    Chuck - I've just realised through another discussion that the 28mm Ricoh FoV is radically different to the 28mm on a 35mm camera with its 3:2 ratio. IMO working with the Ricoh is much more like working with a 35mm on a rangefinder. Others who reject the Ricoh because it's "too wide" might like to look at the example shots on this post: http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/showth...=5368#post5368

    Best

  11. #11
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    So when is FedEX overnight from Japan not really overnight? Apparently, during the holidays is when packages "absolutely, positively, reliably, maybe, kinda, sort of have to be there overnight". But after chasing my packages around since Friday I do now have all the pieces in place to test this "40" adapter. This morning I published my last article before my holiday vacation but I'll play with the 40 over the next couple of days, as time allows, and report back. Testing, in earnest, will start after the holidays.

    We have a four year old and a 12 year old and then lots of guests are coming - should be an exciting couple of days.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  12. #12
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    And here in Bangkok the Ricoh Camera importer doesn't even yet have a price from from Japan for the 40mm converter, which they say that they were trying to get last week.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  13. #13
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    I will call Popflash and see if they actually have any, their site says they will be available after 12/21....

  14. #14
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Popflash has them. They're selling fast. I ordered one.

    Best,

    Mitchell

  15. #15
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Hi folks, first time posting here. Love the GRD2!

    I've actually had my 40mm x1.43 converter since last Friday, from Adorama. I haven't used it yet because I'm waiting for a VL VF, but a couple observations:

    It does make the camera bulkier, and it's not really pocketable, but it's still a really small compact setup, and the converter and adapter adds a considerable amount of weight. One minor negative is that the lens cap seems pretty loose. It doesn't fall off when the camera is tipped down, but it doesn't take much to knock it off.

    I think the best bet is to use a neck strap and carry the camera that way. It does make me wonder, however, why I'm not just carrying my D80, but the GRD2 40mm setup is way lighter and smaller.

  16. #16
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Player,
    Understood about the bulk factor.
    I have that issue with GW-1 21mm adapter on my GRD.
    I love the results but it is a bit of a pain to carry about separately or attched.
    The small form factor and fast response are a big part of why I carry my GRD.
    With the HA-1 and with either lens adapter is gonna be far more bulky (if only marginally heavier).
    Even with both lens adapters the whole kit is still smaller than my K100D and the 18-55mm kit lens however.
    Sigh.
    Part of me says to stay with the "Razor" only, part wants the 40mm and another, greedy part, says "get the GX100".
    Decisions, decisions.
    ^_^
    Last edited by Lili; 25th December 2007 at 10:39.

  17. #17
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Hi Lili,

    I sympathize, it's tough finding a gear setup that you're 100% comfortable and satisfied with. The GRD2 is a terrific carry-anywhere camera with the 28mm lens, but throw on a converter lens and the equation changes.

    If I had my druthers, I'd rather the GRD2 came with a standard 40mm lens, and 21 and 28mm converters, but I'm not complaining. A website, The Online Photographer I think, did a survey of photographer's favorite focal lengths for a compact camera, and it was about 72% in favor of a 35-40mm (equivalent 35mm) focal length. I wonder if Ricoh ever conducted similar research? It's still a great camera though. Nice talking to you!

  18. #18
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    Player,
    Understood about the bulk factor.
    I have that issue with GW-1 21mm adapter on my GRD.
    I love the results but it is a bit of a pain to carry about separately or attched.
    The small form factor and fast response are a big part of why I carry my GRD.
    With the HA-1 and with either lens adapter is gonna be far more bulky (if only marginally heavier).
    Even with both lens adapters the whole kit is still smaller than my K100D and the 18-55mm kit lens however.
    Sigh.
    Part of me says to stay with the "Razor" only, part wants the 40mm and another, greedy part, says "get the GX100".
    Decisions, decisions.
    ^_^
    I know what you mean. I am trying to decide between the GX100 and the GRDII. Like I said before I am concerned about the wide lens on the GRDII. The 40mm converter sound great in theory but in practice it may not be the best solution.

    I am drawn to the comments about the GRDII lens being sharper with better contrast. I just can't get away from the 28mm FOV though. Even if it is a bit narrower than a SLR 28mm FOV. The GX100 has the 24-72mm which intrigues me for its usefulness. The RAW buffer on the GRDII is also a great plus. I will have to wait for Sean's comparison review. The more I read in these threads the more I bounce back and forth.

    When the GX100 first came out I was not very impressed with the output I was seeing. But I was really just looking at reviews from Dpreview and the like. After seeing some results from the better photographers I see what it can do. I would love to see these cameras in person but I live in the boonies and have a long drive to even hope to see one. Actually I would love to see some of the results in person as well. Those from Mitch and others. This will be a camera that I will shoot with often and I have to be able to produce files that will print professionally. Mostly for sale.


    Thanks,
    Chuck A
    www.pbase.com/candrask

  19. #19
    Kuro
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Hi,

    I am very interested in the GRDII and 40mm lens adapter.

    It seems to me that the 40mm with the 1:1 frame would be very close to a 50/2.4 lens setup on the GRDII. Take off the adapter lens and use the 28mm with 1:1 frame and it would be like a 35/2.4. What a great little camera! Btw, I love the 1:1.

  20. #20
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Player View Post
    ...A website, The Online Photographer I think, did a survey of photographer's favorite focal lengths for a compact camera, and it was about 72% in favor of a 35-40mm (equivalent 35mm) focal length. I wonder if Ricoh ever conducted similar research? It's still a great camera though...
    Keep in mind that Ricoh had great success with the GR1 (28mm) and GR21 (21mm) 35mm film cameras that sld extremely well in Japan. The GRD and GRD2 are the digital versions of those cameras, and have also been very well received in Japan.

    The trouble with surveys like that of The Online Photographer is that it measures the preferences of what people think they want based, obviously, on what people have had experience with: before I bought my GRD in July 2006 I had used a 28mm lens on the Leica M6 no more than for a dozen pictures and was using 50mm lenses about 80-90% of the time. When I got my GRD I thought that it would be difficult to use — it was initially — but I persevered because I knew that Moriyama Daida, a great Japanese photographer that I admire, used the GR1 and GR21 almost exclusively. After a while I found that I could get pictures with the 28mm EFOV of the GRD quite easily and began to like it, but, from time to time, I missed a 50mm lens. That's why I bought the GX100 at the end of August. But when I review pictures I've shot with the GX100 since then I find that I've been using the 28mm EFOV for more than 80% of the pictures. So it looks like even one's own assumptions about the focal length one wants or needs can be wrong, as can be the type of survey referred to above.

    Sometimes manufacturers need to lead rather than follow the market to have a successful product. As an aside, companies that have been production-oriented and then do extensive market research often make mistake that almost bankrupt them, which is the example of Leica with the M5: they thought that the market wanted the best in-camera meter and produced a camera that the market thought was "clunky" and that did not have the gestalt that the market wanted from a Leica-M. An ever better example is that of Volkswagen in the late-1960's, when they produced the "Type 4", a compact-car sized four-dour vehicle with an air-cooled rear engine: a complete dud, it almost bankrupted VW. A production- rather than market-driven company, VW thought that it was in the business of making cars with air-cooled rear engines, not realising that what the market wanted from them then was highly economic and highly reliable cars, at a time when all other cars were a lot less reliable than automobiles are now.

    —Mitch/Huahin
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  21. #21
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    I actually have no trouble shooting with the 28mm EFL lens on my GRD.
    I like wide to moderate wide angles like the 35mm on my Hexar AF.
    Somehow the limitation of one-camera-one-focal length is oddly freeing.
    It IS nice sometimes to have the 21mm option available and may well be the same with the 40mm.
    I will stick with the GRD for now and perhaps get the 40 for those times I need that option.
    I eventually will get a GRD II, but I've only had the GRD a couple of months it deserves to be used fully till then.
    Ah well, now to PP the shots I have recenly done in RAW.
    Learning curve is steep and time is short

  22. #22
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Good points Mitch! I haven't used my GRD2 enough to have an opinion about the 28mm focal length. I took that survey and "thought" that I would prefer a 35-40mm lens, but I might discover otherwise after actually working with the camera. It's taken me awhile to figure-out the camera and to formulate a rough workflow.

    One thing that I've found particularly offensive, at The Online Photographer site, is the prevailing opinion that a smaller sensor camera is not a serious tool and is just a "notepad" (to quote Mike Johnston). I was reading other opinions that mimicked Mike, and all I could think about was the amazing "serious" photography I had seen from yourself, especially, and others as well. And the whole notion of a small sensor camera as just a notepad seemed insulting. I equate the small sensor GRD to 35mm film (IQ and enlargement potential), and since when has 35mm film photography been a mere notepad? I asked Mike if he considered 35 film as a notepad format, and he never replied. The idea seems to be that compact cameras won't arrive as a serious tool until an APS-sized sensor is employed. From what I've seen, this is false, but it seems once people get an idea into their heads, similar to that survey I suppose, there's no turning back, which seems ignorant and unfortunate to me. Anyway, sorry for the digression.

  23. #23
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Lili, glad to hear your positive experiences shooting 28mm. I always avoided that focal length when I shot film, but it might turn-out to be different with the GRD. I pretty much went with the GRD2 because of the availability of the GT-1.

    I know what you mean: the "learning" never ends, and yes, time is short. Good luck!

  24. #24
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Player View Post
    Lili, glad to hear your positive experiences shooting 28mm. I always avoided that focal length when I shot film, but it might turn-out to be different with the GRD. I pretty much went with the GRD2 because of the availability of the GT-1.

    I know what you mean: the "learning" never ends, and yes, time is short. Good luck!
    Player,
    I find that, esp with people shots, the wider angles force me to get in closer and interact more.
    The greater intimacy makes for better shots IMHO.
    Using the Hexar AF exclusively for long time really taught me that.

  25. #25
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Yesterday I told some family members that I'd taken a cue from them and brought a point and shoot (the GRD II.) They take pictures to record family stuff whereas I am an OH SO SERIOUS PHOTOGRAPHER. When I used the Leica people are impressed. The Ricoh, not so much. If we all use point and shoots, how will we tell who serious?! My gosh, we may have to start really looking at the pictures.

    Be kind when you look at these. The GRD and shooting people are new to me. But, this camera is really fun.

    Best,

    Mitchell




    Attachment 984







    Attachment 985

  26. #26
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Lili, it sounds like your GRD is a great camera for you. I think it will be for me too.

    I have a Minox 35 GT-E that I've always loved, and I've been looking for a digital replacement, and nothing comes as close as the GRD, that I can see, anyway. And yes, the Minox has a 35/2.8 lens, but the GRD gives you 40 all the way down to 21mm.

    Appreciate your input! Thankyou.

  27. #27
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Love the pics Mitchell!

    Sort of like "serious snapshots," if that's not too contradictory.

  28. #28
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Mitchell,
    Nice shots!
    Player,
    My first serious camera was an old Minox 35EL my dad bought me while I was in high school.
    I just about wore it out before it got stolen.
    I used my Ex'es OM-1 and Rolleiflex while we were married and then I eventually got a Hexar AF, which was my sole camera for years.
    I adore that camera; it is the 'gold standard' by which I judge other cameras
    Last edited by Lili; 26th December 2007 at 07:38.

  29. #29
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Lili, I had a 35 ML before the GT-E. I wish I had held onto the ML, that lens was super sharp! I have tons of wear on my GT-E. The finish isn't that robust, but the camera works fine. Too bad your EL got lifted, sorry. It sounds like you got a lot of good use out of it though.

    At one point I was going to buy a Hexar, but I couldn't find one, which says a lot. The Hexar is in a different league than the Minox.

    The whole point, I guess, is that these small cameras fill an important role in a photographer's arsenal: they allow the photographer to #1, always have a camera with them, and #2, to get pictures they couldn't normally get with an SLR or DSLR, but forgive me for preaching to the choir.

  30. #30
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Lili and Player,

    Thanks for the comments.

    You may want to know there's a Excell. Cond. Hexar at Keh for $849.

  31. #31
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell View Post
    Lili and Player,

    Thanks for the comments.

    You may want to know there's a Excell. Cond. Hexar at Keh for $849.
    Mitchekl, the $849 one is the Hexar RF, with is an AE autowind interchangeable lens Rangfinder camera.
    The Hexar AF, which I have is a fixed lens (35mm/f2) autofocus/autowind camera with a very good viewfinder.
    The AF was designed as a compact super high performance street shooter.
    The lens/af system are incredible; it can focus in total darkness and the lens is razor sharp even wide open.
    For me it is the standard which I judge any compact AF camera, film or digital.
    To paraphrase and agree with Dante Stella; if I had 5 minutes to pack for a round-the world-trip and could only take one camera, the Hexar AF would be it.
    Keh has two of these, the silver model without the silent mode (tho that can be added by firmware upgrade), for between $399 and $465.
    Fairly typical prices.
    Mine is the classic black one.
    Last edited by Lili; 26th December 2007 at 12:03.

  32. #32
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Lili,

    Thanks for straightening me out. I read Dante Stella piece on the Hexar AF. Very cool.
    I'd buy one if I were still shooting film.

    Mitchell

  33. #33
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by chris_tribble View Post
    Chuck - I've just realised through another discussion that the 28mm Ricoh FoV is radically different to the 28mm on a 35mm camera with its 3:2 ratio. IMO working with the Ricoh is much more like working with a 35mm on a rangefinder. Others who reject the Ricoh because it's "too wide" might like to look at the example shots on this post: http://forum.getdpi.com/forum/showth...=5368#post5368

    Best
    Well maybe we can impose upon Sean to test this out. The photos in the other thread showed quite a difference in FOV. Maybe someone could measure what the actual FOV is with the GRDII.

    In Seans review of the GRD he takes the time to post that the FOV was very wide for him and that a purchase decision would definitely rely on whether the photographer liked that FOV. I shoot with primes mostly in the 35-75mm range on my DSLR so having a prime is not a problem. I just have to decide if the FOV is useable for me.

    I have come to love the small sensor format ever since I had the Panasonic LC1 (Leica Digilux 2). It had an incredible lens that was very 3D in its rendering. It was the first small sensor camera that actual felt like and worked like a camera IMHO. It had 2 fatal flaws: No RAW buffer (long RAW write times) and jpg smoothing above ISO 100. RAW took too long and jpg was unacceptable above ISO 100. I took some great photos with that camera and found that I see very well with the small sensor. It seems to be a natural format for me. I love the DOF. Finding another small sensor camera that produced acceptable results with the features that I like in a camera has been rough. They all seem to either smooth the jpgs too much, have bad RAW write times or are missing things like dedicated buttons and a flash shoe.

    I passed on the GRD because of the horrible RAW write times and 28mm wide lens. Too bad the GX100's RAW times are slow as well. But since it has acceptable jpgs it is still on the list. The GRDII seems to have the features I want and the addition of the 40mm converter may be the answer. I am patiently waiting for Seans review.

    I know he received a GX100 to compare and I will be very interested in how the lenses compare for sharpness and other lens qualities. That will help in my decision to get the GX100 or the GRDII.

  34. #34
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Hi Chuck,

    I will be testing the actual FOV of the GR2 (with and without "tele" adapter). Right now, I'm only looking at pictures on a laptop screen but the resolution of pictures made with the "40" adapter seems to be quite high. Once I'm back in my studio, I'll do side by side resolution tests with the GX-100 and G9.

    As with the "21" adapter, the "40" adapter adds a considerable amount of bulk to the GR2. It clearly is no longer a pocket camera and feels a bit more like a small-scale SLR.

    The RAW write times on the GX-100 are much faster than those I saw from the original GR. I haven't compared the former with the GR 2 yet.

    I still feel strongly that it is important for a photographer to consider how well he or she will get on with the GR2's EFOV although the add-on lens does make that more versatile.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Last edited by Sean_Reid; 28th December 2007 at 05:23.

  35. #35
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    My 2 cents on the EFOV of the the GRD I/II lens;
    I use the CV 28mm OVF with mine, the field of view match perfectly when I use the 3:2 format on the GRD so we are getting a 28mm EFOV.
    Since this format is got by merely vertically cropping the full 4:3 format of the sensor it follows that using the full sensor give one an even greater angle of view.
    Again I *really* like the 28mm view point.
    As regards the add-on lenses; they are great as an option, but the added bulk is not so cool.
    I got the GR because of high IQ in a tiny package.
    And really *hate* to compromise that form factor.

  36. #36
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Actually, I'm not crazy about losing that tiny camera size either.

    BTW, the CV 40 finder works well with the GR2 "tele" adapter.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  37. #37
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    Hi Chuck,

    I will be testing the actual FOV of the GR2 (with and without "tele" adapter). Right now, I'm only looking at pictures on a laptop screen but the resolution of pictures made with the "40" adapter seems to be quite high. Once I'm back in my studio, I'll do side by side resolution tests with the GX-100 and G9.

    As with the "21" adapter, the "40" adapter adds a considerable amount of bulk to the GR2. It clearly is no longer a pocket camera and feels a bit more like a small-scale SLR.

    The RAW write times on the GX-100 are much faster than those I saw from the original GR. I haven't compared the former with the GR 2 yet.

    I still feel strongly that it is important for a photographer to consider how well he or she will get on with the GR2's EFOV although the add-on lens does make that more versatile.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Sean,

    I await your review. I am trying to decide between the GX100, GRDII and possibly the G9 so I am glad that you are doing that one too. I believe that each of these cameras will produce good small sensor results so it comes down to each as a unique photographic tool. One important item is that they seem to keep the noise reduction to a minimum. They are unique in this feature. The GRDII is quite a bit more expensive when you add the 40mm converter so that is a concern as well. Is it really going to give me my moneys worth?

    Handling, the viewfinder options and ease of use features are important to me. I want a simple camera that stays out of my way and lets me concentrate on photography. A computer with a lens sticking out of it is NOT a camera. When the camera is distracting to use photography is not nearly as enjoyable for me. I love your reviews because you approach the cameras from this angle.

    Thanks for your replies.

  38. #38
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck A View Post
    Sean,

    I await your review. I am trying to decide between the GX100, GRDII and possibly the G9 so I am glad that you are doing that one too. I believe that each of these cameras will produce good small sensor results so it comes down to each as a unique photographic tool. One important item is that they seem to keep the noise reduction to a minimum. They are unique in this feature. The GRDII is quite a bit more expensive when you add the 40mm converter so that is a concern as well. Is it really going to give me my moneys worth?

    Handling, the viewfinder options and ease of use features are important to me. I want a simple camera that stays out of my way and lets me concentrate on photography. A computer with a lens sticking out of it is NOT a camera. When the camera is distracting to use photography is not nearly as enjoyable for me. I love your reviews because you approach the cameras from this angle.

    Thanks for your replies.
    Chuck,
    If I may give advice, if you really are not comfortable with a fixed focal length, then I would strongly consider the GX100.
    While the GRD's are said to have more *bite* image-wise- from what I have seen the difference would not be enough to make up for the added expence and bulk of the add-on lenses.
    Basically the GRD's AND the GX100 are ALL capable of very high image quality and have equally superb interfaces.
    In brief, if you need a range of focal lengths the GX100 is a far more practical, portable and afforable option.
    A true "Swiss Army Knife" as Ricoh calls it.
    With me, coming from a Hexar AF viewpoint, the "Razor", the GRD, is perfect.
    While I do have an add-on lens for those few times I *really* need a wider POV, I much prefer carrying the GRD with just the CV-28.
    Tiny, light and quick.

  39. #39
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    Chuck,
    If I may give advice, if you really are not comfortable with a fixed focal length, then I would strongly consider the GX100.
    While the GRD's are said to have more *bite* image-wise- from what I have seen the difference would not be enough to make up for the added expence and bulk of the add-on lenses.
    Basically the GRD's AND the GX100 are ALL capable of very high image quality and have equally superb interfaces.
    In brief, if you need a range of focal lengths the GX100 is a far more practical, portable and afforable option.
    A true "Swiss Army Knife" as Ricoh calls it.
    With me, coming from a Hexar AF viewpoint, the "Razor", the GRD, is perfect.
    While I do have an add-on lens for those few times I *really* need a wider POV, I much prefer carrying the GRD with just the CV-28.
    Tiny, light and quick.
    Thanks for the advice. It is not that I am uncomfortable with a fixed focal length. I have been a photographer for over 30 years and I use my K10D with a prime on it most of the time. Mainly a 28mm f/2.8 with a FOV of a 42mm or a 35mm with a 52mm FOV. I actually prefer to carry a single focal length. My concern is the 28mm FOV. It is not a focal length that I use everyday. Even when using a zoom that goes that wide I only find myself using the 28mm FOV in special situations. I much prefer a 35-75mm FOV for the majority of my work. The LC1 that I had went from 28-90mm and when I go back over those photos I find that I rarely used the 28mm. As you and others have stated the addition of the converter is going to add to the size and take away some of the charm of the GRDII.

    Now, having said that, I am not against stretching myself and trying the larger FOV. Perhaps it can spark some creativity. The GX100 goes even wider. I just don't want to sink the extra cash into the GRDII and discover that I would have preferred the GX100. The difference in price is not trivial. Perhaps in the $350-$450 range with the converter.

    I am aware of the RAW buffer difference. Is there any other great advantage to having the GRDII over the GX100?

    Perhaps I will put the zoom on my K10D and set it to 28mm and keep it there for a while. That may help me to decide whether I can like that FOV.

    Anyway thanks for the help. I am sure that Sean's review will help as well. I you have any other tidbits, please send them my way. I have gone through 5 or 6 small sensor cameras, each with great hopes, and all have been disappointments. And since these things don't hold their value well, it has cost be alot to try them as well.
    Last edited by Chuck A; 28th December 2007 at 09:09.

  40. #40
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    There seems to be a bit of a feeding frenzy around here surrounding the Ricoh cameras and I can't help but wonder if it's obscuring some very fine alternates.

    Might I suggest the Leica D-Lux 3 for those who want a zoom-lens-ed compact camera? IMO, the only things the GX-100 has over it are the hot shoe and the stepped zoom. From the photos I've seen, the D-Lux 3 is capable of producing superior images, so if you're not totally committed to using an external VF, the Leica is a better choice.

    Just because Mitch couldn't get his look with ISO800 on the D-Lux 3, that's no reason to rule it out for anyone else's work.

  41. #41
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Hi Maggie,

    I really like the D-Lux 3 as well. In addition to the hotshoe (for finders) which one can glue on to a D-Lux if he or she is a bit handy, the GX-100 also has a stepped zoom which is enormously useful to anyone who wants to work with "prime" lenses and, sometimes, finders.

    The Leica/Panasonic, of course, has that lovely 16:9 ratio available natively.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  42. #42
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Maggie O View Post
    There seems to be a bit of a feeding frenzy around here surrounding the Ricoh cameras and I can't help but wonder if it's obscuring some very fine alternates.

    Might I suggest the Leica D-Lux 3 for those who want a zoom-lens-ed compact camera? IMO, the only things the GX-100 has over it are the hot shoe and the stepped zoom. From the photos I've seen, the D-Lux 3 is capable of producing superior images, so if you're not totally committed to using an external VF, the Leica is a better choice.

    Just because Mitch couldn't get his look with ISO800 on the D-Lux 3, that's no reason to rule it out for anyone else's work.

    Maggie,

    Thanks for the input. I have looked hard at the D-lux 3. From what I can tell the jpgs above ISO 200 are crippled by noise reduction. The Ricohs seem to be much better in that respect. Shooting RAW will help this but one of the reasons that I got rid of the Pan LC1 was the smoothing of the jpgs. I don't always shoot RAW and want access to virtually no noise reduction. The GX100 and the LC1 both take about 5-7 secs to write a RAW file so it is not always useable. If I have can shoot good quality jpgs then it will be much less of a problem.

    You are correct though. I have looked hard at the photos from the Leica and the lens produces a very nice image file with a very 3D look to it. I guess that it is not a bad thing to have so many choices. I am basically looking for a small version of the Leica M and Tri-X combo. A good clear finder and sharp lens that produces great 11x14 size prints even if there is some grain to be had. I used this combo for years. The things that the small sensor format adds above the Leica M is the great DOF and smaller size.

  43. #43
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Sean, I'm guessing you'll have some good things to say about the Canon G9, as well.

  44. #44
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    FWIW Chuck, the D-Lux 3, with a San Disk eXtreme III card has a RAW write time of around 3.5 seconds.

    I've gotten some pretty good results at ISO400 with JPEGs and even at ISO800, with the right conditions. Shooting RAW, the D-Lux 3's ISO800 files are gorgeous.

  45. #45
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    Hi Maggie,

    I really like the D-Lux 3 as well. In addition to the hotshoe (for finders) which one can glue on to a D-Lux if he or she is a bit handy, the GX-100 also has a stepped zoom which is enormously useful to anyone who wants to work with "prime" lenses and, sometimes, finders.

    The Leica/Panasonic, of course, has that lovely 16:9 ratio available natively.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    I have a Panasonic camera that gives me the 16:9 format and I find that I don't use it. I am not very fond of it, but I am very attracted to the 1:1 format of the Ricohs though. Having used a Yashicamat for many years until it broke and I miss the square format.

    The stepped zoom of the GX100 is also very interesting. Your idea of carrying separate finders and using the step zoom in ingenious. It can get a bit expensive though.

  46. #46
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Maggie O View Post
    FWIW Chuck, the D-Lux 3, with a San Disk eXtreme III card has a RAW write time of around 3.5 seconds.

    I've gotten some pretty good results at ISO400 with JPEGs and even at ISO800, with the right conditions. Shooting RAW, the D-Lux 3's ISO800 files are gorgeous.

    You would have to add some more wrenches into the works. LOL! I will take another look at the Leica just to make sure. Thanks for the input.

  47. #47
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Chuck,
    I think working with your K10D with a 28mm EFL lens is good way to decide on this.
    Lili

  48. #48
    Player
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Just to let you guys know, I received my Voigtlander 40mm VF, and it's really sharp and bright. The only negative I can see is that the flash doesn't clear.

    I was curious about something, just underneath the top frameline there's a dashed line. Is that for 3:2 format and the top solid line is 4:3? That doesn't seem correct because the VF was made for film cameras. Can someone enlighten me? Thankyou.

  49. #49
    Chuck A
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Player View Post
    Just to let you guys know, I received my Voigtlander 40mm VF, and it's really sharp and bright. The only negative I can see is that the flash doesn't clear.

    I was curious about something, just underneath the top frameline there's a dashed line. Is that for 3:2 format and the top solid line is 4:3? That doesn't seem correct because the VF was made for film cameras. Can someone enlighten me? Thankyou.
    Could be for parallax correction.

  50. #50
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    Re: Ricoh "40 mm" Adapter

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck A View Post
    Could be for parallax correction.
    Interesting Chuck, I never thought of that. Thankyou.

    Could someone confirm? Thanks.

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