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Thread: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

  1. #51
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by scott kirkpatrick View Post
    Like Jono, I'm happy to wait back in the line a bit on this one. The specs for the Casio super HDTV consumer cam are pretty impressive. The TBD lines suggest that it hasn't quite happened yet. Does anyone know when they claim it will be available? I wouldn't touch it until I have my home network and my 2TB mirrored backup storage working. That thing could blow out my laptop in a few minutes of shooting. But Sean, think what this could offer for your wedding standard shots -- bouquet tossing, first dance, little faces smeared with cake -- I know that's not what you promise, but don't they insist on it anyway?
    scott

    Hi Scott,

    No, they don't hire me to shoot cliches at all. In fact, they hire me specifically because my pictures made at weddings often don't much look like "wedding pictures" (http://www.still-photo.net). They hire me to photograph what really happens. Otherwise, I'd never shoot weddings. I don't really like "wedding photography" per se. But if one approaches the subject purely as a subject (without preconceived ideas about what the pictures should look like), it can be quite rich.

    The only pictures we usually shoot that are standards are 5 - 10 formal pictures of various groups. Although some clients don't even want those. There are a number of clients out there who really do want pictures made of their wedding, not "wedding pictures".

    I would not use a camera like that Casio at a wedding. As I said earlier in this thread, I'm of the "pay attention and make one exposure per chosen picture" school. I never owned a motor drive and never wanted one. I may make several pictures in a short space of time but, if I do, each one is different and made at an intentional time. To be clear, I'm not saying that such is the rule for everyone. Rather, its just how I work.

    Also, between Melissa and I, we often have 2000 + frames from a day's shoot. Editing those is already a huge task. Having multiple exposures for each intended picture would be a nightmare.

    I'm not very interested in the Casio for myself. I'm interested in it for my readers because it may mark an interesting development in the history of cameras. And *someone* may put it to good use.

    In another thread, you asked me how many exposures it took me to get a certain picture you were discussing. And I told you one, but it had to be the right one. Given your questions, I suspect we may approach photographing quite a bit differently. With a couple of commercial exceptions, I only press the shutter when I believe that the visual elements of the picture are coming together in a way that I like. And that's why I always need a first rate finder - I really need to see exactly what's happening just before I press the shutter. It's why I'll never be very happy with SLRs - the viewing DOF is too shallow for what I need to see. I'd rather learn the edges with an RF camera than look through an SLR lens at F/2.0.

    Again, this is me. I'm not trying to suggest universals.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Last edited by Sean_Reid; 25th January 2008 at 08:15.

  2. #52
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    It's why I'll never be very happy with SLRs - the viewing DOF is too shallow for what I need to see. I'd rather learn the edges with an RF camera than look through an SLR lens at F/2.0.

    Again, this is me. I'm not trying to suggest universals.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    I agree completely.
    To elaborate, the increased DOF in either the OVF or the LCD of a small sensor camera lets me take in the entire frame and all its contents and context. For my way of seeing this is important.
    Last edited by Lili; 25th January 2008 at 08:39.

  3. #53
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    [QUOTE=Sean_Reid;8119]
    .... I don't really like "wedding photography" per se. But if one approaches the subject purely as a subject (without preconceived ideas about what the pictures should look like), it can be quite rich.[\QUOTE]

    I feel that way about family events, of which we seem to have quite a few.

    [QUOTE]
    Also, between Melissa and I, we often have 2000 + frames from a day's shoot. Editing those is already a huge task. Having multiple exposures for each intended picture would be a nightmare.
    [\QUOTE]

    Certainly. I think of the Casio in a different way. It makes short slow-motion movies, allowing you to explore movement and gesture. Exploring the frames to find the best one seems like optimizing the wrong thing to me. However, the Casio offers a capability which in a technical camera can cost $100K to $1M down to what will probably be under $1K, and that is an event which will certainly have some consequences.

    In another thread, you asked me how many exposures it took me to get a certain picture you were discussing. And I told you one, but it had to be the right one. Given your questions, I suspect we may approach photographing quite a bit differently. With a couple of commercial exceptions, I only press the shutter when I believe that the visual elements of the picture are coming together in a way that I like.
    I try to work that way, but fail often. Sometimes the failures are also interesting, so I keep trying even when things aren't quite what I thought would happen.

    regards,

    scott

  4. #54
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Hi Scott,

    Yes, I feel the same way about family events, etc. (as you already know and as I've written about before).

    I agree that the Casio could be important because of what it may be introducing.

    Most of my pictures fail too.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  5. #55
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by scott kirkpatrick View Post
    Certainly. I think of the Casio in a different way. It makes short slow-motion movies, allowing you to explore movement and gesture. Exploring the frames to find the best one seems like optimizing the wrong thing to me. However, the Casio offers a capability which in a technical camera can cost $100K to $1M down to what will probably be under $1K, and that is an event which will certainly have some consequences.
    Hi Scott
    I agree - an important event with consequences; it's been coming for some time, and I think it's a really important step. It rather frightens me - it indicates a different way of working which sounds time consuming and which negates what small skills I have in catching 'the decisive moment'.

    I suspect that my suspicions and antagonisms are very much like many photographers apprehension towards digital (that has never worried me).

    Most of my pictures fail as well, but I'm not sure that I want a new device which will allow success, but does it a completely different way.

    incidentally, apologies for the rather silly post with respect to the GRDII - do you feel it gives you better results than the D-lux2?

    Just this guy you know

  6. #56
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Hi Scott
    I agree - an important event with consequences; it's been coming for some time, and I think it's a really important step. It rather frightens me - it indicates a different way of working which sounds time consuming and which negates what small skills I have in catching 'the decisive moment'.

    ... with respect to the GRDII - do you feel it gives you better results than the D-lux2?
    I bought a GL-2 and a smaller fist-sized video camera for my lab a few years back. Shot and edited a lot that year (using Adobe Premiere, as this was before Final Cut had taken off), and enjoyed it, but I haven't wanted to return to that workload. It seems my students are much better at this than I am. And my children both are excited by the moments they capture in short videos. They hardly edit beyond what they can review immediately on the LCD of a little handheld.

    When you look at what video vs still photography contributes to day to day news, such as coverage of the US presidential primaries, I think the selected still frames are actually more distorted in their emphasis than the "sound bites." E.g. the "Hillary looks exhausted and OLD" image that was widely discussed and ended up helping her get some sympathy vote in the New Hampshire primary. Perhaps paparazzi images and sound bites are so far from the perceptions we want to capture and share that they both should be irrelevant. But they are not; they strongly influence the self-image that the millions of camera purchasers carry around with them. And thus also the cameras that are available.

    scott

    Oh -- I haven't tried the D-Lux 2.

  7. #57
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Hi Scott
    I agree - an important event with consequences; it's been coming for some time, and I think it's a really important step. It rather frightens me - it indicates a different way of working which sounds time consuming and which negates what small skills I have in catching 'the decisive moment'.

    I suspect that my suspicions and antagonisms are very much like many photographers apprehension towards digital (that has never worried me).

    Most of my pictures fail as well, but I'm not sure that I want a new device which will allow success, but does it a completely different way.

    incidentally, apologies for the rather silly post with respect to the GRDII - do you feel it gives you better results than the D-lux2?
    I doubt that new way of recording pictures will make for fewer failed pictures. Rather, the failed pictures will have many similar variations. <G>

    Cheers,

    Sean

  8. #58
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    I doubt that new way of recording pictures will make for fewer failed pictures. Rather, the failed pictures will have many similar variations. <G>

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Sturgeon's Law continues to apply.

  9. #59
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by scott kirkpatrick View Post
    When you look at what video vs still photography contributes to day to day news, such as coverage of the US presidential primaries, I think the selected still frames are actually more distorted in their emphasis than the "sound bites." E.g. the "Hillary looks exhausted and OLD" image that was widely discussed and ended up helping her get some sympathy vote in the New Hampshire primary. Perhaps paparazzi images and sound bites are so far from the perceptions we want to capture and share that they both should be irrelevant. But they are not; they strongly influence the self-image that the millions of camera purchasers carry around with them. And thus also the cameras that are available.

    scott

    Oh -- I haven't tried the D-Lux 2.
    Of course they aren't irrelevant - you've certainly clarified my concern though, in that it means that photography is reduced from 'catching the moment' to a process of 'selection' from all possible moments. Reducing the act from 'intention' to 'selection'. I am, however, suspicious of my misgivings!

    As for the small sensor camera I'll be buying, I'm still somewhat at a loss, but considering that I almost always carry around a bag with an M8 (and a backup) in it, I think that a lens with more focal length range is in order . . . which brings me back again to the GX100 / Dlux-3 / G9.

    Decisions decisions . . . maybe I should just go for the Leica because it comes in a nicer bag!

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  10. #60
    asabet
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Jono, the D-LUX 3 has no hot shoe, so adding an OVF is not easily done. The G9 is a step towards your M8 in size and weight. Regarding the GX100, if you plan to shoot it mainly at 28mm in 4:3 format, the GV-1 is a great accessory. If you like 28mm and 35mm, especially in 3:2 format, then the CV 28/35 Minifinder is excellent.

  11. #61
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Hi Jono,

    My G9 review should be done next week. The camera has various strengths but two notable weaknesses:

    1) Manual focus can only be used if the LCD is left on
    2) The camera has about a .6 second shutter lag in manual focus mode (even with manual exposure and manual WB).

    Cheers,

    Sean

  12. #62
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by asabet View Post
    Jono, the D-LUX 3 has no hot shoe, so adding an OVF is not easily done. The G9 is a step towards your M8 in size and weight. Regarding the GX100, if you plan to shoot it mainly at 28mm in 4:3 format, the GV-1 is a great accessory. If you like 28mm and 35mm, especially in 3:2 format, then the CV 28/35 Minifinder is excellent.
    Thank you Amin
    I hadn't thought of putting an accessory finder on the GX100 - My wife has a G8, so I'm aware of the size, and my son has a D-LUX2, and I briefly owned a GX100 (I swapped with Wilson Laidlaw for some goodies before I'd really got to grips with it).

    I don't have a very good history of success with small sensor cameras, I'm really interested in finding the one that is 'least irritating'.

    Other people's input is very helpful (dunno why this causes me so much anguish, I bought an M8 without a second's consideration!).

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  13. #63
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    HI Sean
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    Hi Jono,

    My G9 review should be done next week. The camera has various strengths but two notable weaknesses:

    1) Manual focus can only be used if the LCD is left on
    2) The camera has about a .6 second shutter lag in manual focus mode (even with manual exposure and manual WB).

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Ahh . . . I could manage with 1), but 2) would drive me crazy.

    As I said to Amin, I haven't had much luck with small sensor cameras in the past, and it seems to me that zone focusing and manual focus is almost certainly the way to avoid irritation.
    The attraction of the G9 was the optical viewfinder (poxy though it may be!).

    For me it's definitely a case of the 'least worst' option. It's becoming relevant as we go skiing in a few weeks, and I'd like not to carry a bag around with me this year!

    Your reviews are particularly helpful - not simply in terms of the quality of the results, but also in terms of the actual useage of the thing.

    Just this guy you know

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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    Hi Jono,

    My G9 review should be done next week. The camera has various strengths but two notable weaknesses:

    1) Manual focus can only be used if the LCD is left on
    2) The camera has about a .6 second shutter lag in manual focus mode (even with manual exposure and manual WB).

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Sean,
    This is really interesting because I always thought on manual focus the lag time was the same as the time from half to full press of the shutter when using AF (meaning the first bit of time in the half press was the AF and the second bit the real lag time). I always looked at those times on DPReview. Good to know that my thought process is flawed! I wonder why on the G9 they slow it down and what is going on in the camera because their half to full press time is pretty normal.

  15. #65
    stnami
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    I haven't had much luck with small sensor cameras in the past
    .. at first I really liked what the GRD produced but then it sorta lost me, the size was ok and it's footprint was too dominant. In the end I figured that I either take photos or I do something else, so I don't really need small to carry around. I went back to the D2 for my wide DOF images, I know the camera and It does produce fantastic results for it's sensor size..........
    I considered a small sensor camera like the G9 for some minor movie stuff, it just didn't cut the mustard went for a HV-20 instead, better a purpose built item than a all rounder........


    taste good


    all this is not a decisive moment

  16. #66
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by stnami View Post


    all this is not a decisive moment
    Quite right - sorry - missing the point - when you say D2 do you mean d-lux2?

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  17. #67
    stnami
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    I mean the old Digilux 2..light, not small....... it's great portrait camera and works on the streets as well

  18. #68
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Thank you Amin
    I hadn't thought of putting an accessory finder on the GX100 - My wife has a G8, so I'm aware of the size, and my son has a D-LUX2, and I briefly owned a GX100 (I swapped with Wilson Laidlaw for some goodies before I'd really got to grips with it).
    .
    Hi Jono,

    Take a look at the GX100 review for the discussion about using a set of finders with the step zoom.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Last edited by Sean_Reid; 27th January 2008 at 04:44.

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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    2) The camera has about a .6 second shutter lag in manual focus mode (even with manual exposure and manual WB).
    I found a related anomaly a while ago when I did a lab experiment to understand how my E-1 does its power management. In manual focus mode (using a focus-by-wire ring on the lenses) the E-1 consumes more power than in autofocus. That's because the servos (electronics and motors inside the lens) that are employed when focusing manually stay powered up until the shot is taken. When you autofocus, this stuff shuts down once you have half-pressed and hold the shutter button ready. Presumably in the G9 there is some overhead in relieving an internal microcontroller of its job in focusing and getting it ready to take the picture. Even so, 0.6 seconds seems long. How did you measure it?

    scott

  20. #70
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    HI Sean

    Ahh . . . I could manage with 1), but 2) would drive me crazy....
    Both aspects were significant problems for me.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  21. #71
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Quite right - sorry - missing the point - when you say D2 do you mean d-lux2?
    Don't worry about it. We sometimes drift a bit on this forum. And, actually, a 6/10 second shutter lag affects shutter release timing quite a bit. i.e.: One can't be decisive if a camera won't cooperate.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  22. #72
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by scott kirkpatrick View Post
    I found a related anomaly a while ago when I did a lab experiment to understand how my E-1 does its power management. In manual focus mode (using a focus-by-wire ring on the lenses) the E-1 consumes more power than in autofocus. That's because the servos (electronics and motors inside the lens) that are employed when focusing manually stay powered up until the shot is taken. When you autofocus, this stuff shuts down once you have half-pressed and hold the shutter button ready. Presumably in the G9 there is some overhead in relieving an internal microcontroller of its job in focusing and getting it ready to take the picture. Even so, 0.6 seconds seems long. How did you measure it?

    scott

    Hi Scott,

    Interesting about the E1.

    Intuitively, the G9 seemed very slow in MF mode. I became particularly aware of the problem when I was doing some simple panning pictures with both the G9 and the GX100.

    My method was to photograph an on-screen stopwatch and then adjust for the confounding variables. The reason that I report "about" 6/10 second is that my method doesn't allow me to be accurate to the hundredths.

    To confirm my own results, though, I checked the review by Imaging Resource (whom I've written for in the past), and they got about the same number for the G9.

    I'm scooping my own review here...oops. More when its released. Meanwhile, here are Imaging-Resources numbers:

    http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/G9/G9A6.HTM

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Last edited by Sean_Reid; 27th January 2008 at 05:11.

  23. #73
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    Don't worry about it. We sometimes drift a bit on this forum. And, actually, a 6/10 second shutter lag affects shutter release timing quite a bit. i.e.: One can't be decisive if a camera won't cooperate.

    Cheers,

    Sean

    6/10th second certainly is missing the point.
    it's really the idea of using these cameras in manual focus mode that has got me interested again - it was principally shutter lag which had made me give up in the first place.
    I'll now go and look at the idea of using VF and the step zoom in your review (I had read it before, but my concentration span was obviously too small!)

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  24. #74
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by TEBnewyork View Post
    Sean,
    This is really interesting because I always thought on manual focus the lag time was the same as the time from half to full press of the shutter when using AF (meaning the first bit of time in the half press was the AF and the second bit the real lag time). I always looked at those times on DPReview. Good to know that my thought process is flawed! I wonder why on the G9 they slow it down and what is going on in the camera because their half to full press time is pretty normal.
    Back when I started testing cameras I thought the same thing. But it often ain't so. More about this after I finish and publish the review.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  25. #75
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post

    6/10th second certainly is missing the point.
    it's really the idea of using these cameras in manual focus mode that has got me interested again - it was principally shutter lag which had made me give up in the first place.
    I'll now go and look at the idea of using VF and the step zoom in your review (I had read it before, but my concentration span was obviously too small!)
    The only way I've ever gotten any small sensor camera to be truly responsive (lift the camera from my side to my eye and have the shutter trip right away) is with manual focus. None of them is fast to AF (the Sony V1 was close). Some people use the half-press to pre-focus, followed by a full shutter press, but that doesn't work for me when I'm shooting quickly.

    For fast work, speaking only for my personal needs, if a camera doesn't trip the shutter immediately when in MF mode, it's useless to me.

    Yes, 6/10 second is missing the "decisive moment" (the visual peak as the photographer perceives it) by a mile.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  26. #76
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by stnami View Post
    I mean the old Digilux 2..light, not small....... it's great portrait camera and works on the streets as well
    That camera has always made some of the most beautiful small sensor files I've ever seen though it struggles at ISO 400 if the exposure isn't dead on.

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/re...x2-part1.shtml

    Cheers,

    Sean

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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    Hi Scott,

    To confirm my own results, though, I checked the review by Imaging Resource (whom I've written for in the past), and they got about the same number for the G9.

    I'm scooping my own review here...oops. More when its released. Meanwhile, here are Imaging-Resources numbers:

    http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/G9/G9A6.HTM

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Thanks Sean,
    I just went looking at various cameras on imaging resource. Very interesting. Well, it definitely falls in the category of "you learn something new everyday"!

    Terry
    Last edited by Terry; 27th January 2008 at 05:39. Reason: typo

  28. #78
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Dave Etchells is an engineer and they're very thorough about that kind of testing.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  29. #79
    asabet
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by jonoslack View Post
    Thank you Amin
    I hadn't thought of putting an accessory finder on the GX100 - My wife has a G8, so I'm aware of the size, and my son has a D-LUX2, and I briefly owned a GX100 (I swapped with Wilson Laidlaw for some goodies before I'd really got to grips with it).

    I don't have a very good history of success with small sensor cameras, I'm really interested in finding the one that is 'least irritating'.

    Other people's input is very helpful (dunno why this causes me so much anguish, I bought an M8 without a second's consideration!).
    Jono, adding an OVF removes the lag associated with "watching history," as you put it. I found the combination quite rewarding. Personall, if I were going to lug the M8 everywhere anyway, I wouldn't carry a compact camera as well. Instead, I'd use the extra space to carry another lens. I found the GX100 most useful for the times when I was unwilling to carry a larger camera kit as well as the times when I was seeking to be unobtrusive. As a small, silent, plain black camera, the GX100 attracts very little attention.

  30. #80
    tt113
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    My G9 review should be done next week. The camera has various strengths but two notable weaknesses:

    1) Manual focus can only be used if the LCD is left on
    2) The camera has about a .6 second shutter lag in manual focus mode (even with manual exposure and manual WB).

    Sean
    It does seem like the G9 is slower than the G7 in terms of manual focusing speed. According to Imaing-resource.com, the manual focusing speed of G7 is 0.24 second. My own experience confirms that fact because my G7 can snap a shot as fast as my Panasonic Lx1 in manual focus mode (except the G7 slows down when using iso 400 and up).
    It is sad that canon just swap a sensor from the G7 without upgrading the internal processing power. Not just the manual focusing speed is slower, the shot-to-shot time and continuous mode are also slower in the G9.
    In terms of AF speed, my fuji f30 in high-speed mode seems to me acceptable, but it has the worst user-interface.

  31. #81
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    What's the lag time on the GX100 in snap mode?

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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by gromitspapa View Post
    What's the lag time on the GX100 in snap mode?
    Ahh! The crucial question - I'd like to know the answer to that as well, the d-lux 3 seems to be 0.3 seconds, which isn't horrid (but it isn't great either).

    Sean . . . . we wait with baited breath . . . . . . .
    :sleep006:

    Just this guy you know

  33. #83
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by gromitspapa View Post
    What's the lag time on the GX100 in snap mode?
    I never timed it because the camera was responsive enough in MF mode that the question never arose. I only worry about timing a camera when a process involves a lag. Whatever the actual number is for the GX100, its very short.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  34. #84
    asabet
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    In snap mode, I still found a short but significant shutter lag with the GX100. The shutter lag is essentially nil in snap mode if one has already done a half press, and I always assumed it was due to metering since focusing is predetermined in that mode. Sean, perhaps you're not experiencing a significant lag because you are setting exposure manually? I tended to set exposure on the fly with a half press when I think the moment is coming. That way I too could work without a lag but also without manually setting the exposure.

  35. #85
    helgipelgi
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Doing some quick tests on my LX2 the auto WB and metering don't seem to add that much to the lag.

    I think the effect of looking at the LCD while shooting, as well as the absence of mechanical action, gives the illusion of more lag than there actually is.

    You can test this by turning on the fake shutter sound, and then take a picture in MF mode without looking at the screen -- voila, instant response ;)

  36. #86
    Super Duper
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Never rely on the fake shutter sound. It's always a half-second behind the real shutter. Turning it off was one of the first things I did when I got my DL3.

  37. #87
    helgipelgi
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    Yeah, it's always the first thing I turn off.

    But just to test my theory, I found that it seemed snappier with the shutter sound. The combination of the LCD and silent shutter makes it seem slower

  38. #88
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    Re: Decisive Moments for the Small Sensor

    How odd!

    Ah, perception, what a fickle thing.

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