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Thread: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

  1. #1
    Mitch Alland
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    GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    As I got the 40mm EFOV tele-converter only yesterday the risk of this posting is that it's one of those "here are my first pictures" efforts...

    The following picture was taken in very bright light at ISO 200 and makes me feel that for street photography a 40mm EFOV lens can be more difficult to use than a 28mm lens, but it does provide, obviously, more of a "cramped" look because of the difference of perspective, which can be useful for some expressive purposes:




    The second picture, taken at ISO 800, shows that, also obviously, that the 40mm EFOV can be easier to use for portraits than the 28mm EFOV:



    So far, I'm happy with the quality of this tele-converter.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  2. #2
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Mitch,
    Nice 'first shots'!
    Joke!
    Actually the second is outstanding all by itself and the first is effective at illustrating your point about cramped.
    IIRC HCB, Eisenstadt and others used the 50mm efl almost exclusively, at least at first, for their street work.
    Their most effective shots seem to pluck and isolate vignettes from the chaos of life.
    For this the longer efl is ideal.
    It will be interesting to see where this longer lens leads us all.

  3. #3
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    ...HCB, Eisenstadt and others used the 50mm efl almost exclusively, at least at first, for their street work.
    Their most effective shots seem to pluck and isolate vignettes from the chaos of life.
    For this the longer efl is ideal.
    It will be interesting to see where this longer lens leads us all.
    Thanks, Lili.

    When I was using the Leica M6 I started off by shooting 80% with a 35mm lens and 20% with 50mm lenses; later these proportions were reversed and I shot 80% with the 50mm lenses. And I hadn't shot more than some 20 pictures (that I printed) with 28 and 21mm lenses. When I decided to buy the GRD in July 2006, I was concerned that I might find it difficult or not congenial to shoot with a 28mm EFOV lens, but I had an open mind because I knew that my favourite photographer, Moriyama Daida, shot with the Ricoh GR1 (2mm) and GR21 (21mm) film cameras. As I started using the GRD I found that the wider lens took some getting used to, but that it was really suitable for street photography. Nevertheless, from time to time I missed a 50mm lens: that is why I got a D-Lux-3 in December 2006 and, then, the GX100 in late-August 2007, when I still did not know when the GRD2 would be released. And of course this is also the reason that I have now bought the GT1 40mm EFOV tele-converter.

    The GRD2 package, with the GW1 21mm EFOV wide-converter and the GT1 40mm tele-converter, offers now great flexibility. However, many people have suggested that it would be better for Ricoh to make a GRD-40 camera because this is the focal length that interest them. I am not so sure and vacillate between the current solution of the "GRD28" (the current GRD2) camera with the two converter and the idea of three cameras: a GRD21, a GRD28 and a GRD40. The idea of carrying three of these small cameras doesn't pose a problem and obviates the need for putting on converters; on the other hand the current solution of using converters is much cheaper. I could go either way, but it seems to me that people pushing for a GRD40 are ones who haven't warmed to using a 28mm EFOV lens. I should also add that after getting the GX100 I thought that I would shoot ir mainly at 35 and 50mm, but found that some 70% of my shots were still at 28mm and a good many at 24mm — the wide-angle aesthetic can grow on you.

    Finally, I should add that it's quite possible to shoot close-up portraits with a 28mm lens, but the approach has to be different thab the 40mm portrait above, which would have had too much "big nose" distortions with the 28mm lens. For comparison here are two GRD (28mm) portraits, which suggest that, with this focal length, it's best to shoot in profile or limit oneself to distortion that is still acceptable but, certainly, the type of portrait posted above could not have been made with a 28mm EFOV lens:











    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  4. #4
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Gorgeous work, Mitch. The GT-1 suits you.

  5. #5
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Mitch,
    I was in the "GR40" camp as well, although I am completely comfortable with the 28mm EFL (wide IS addicting, so very true). After having tried the GW-1 and now the GT-1 I feel rather different.
    While a different efl GRD would be cool, the quality and economy of these add-on lenses are such that they are in no way a compromise.
    Unlike with a tiny zoom, the max aperture stays the same and they add splendid optional versatility to Ricoh's Razor while not impairing its original mission.
    I understand how your view changed with the GRD, mine moved me to more color work.
    Now, oddly, as soon as the GT-1 is mounted I start to see in B&W

  6. #6
    ellemand
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Hey out there.
    The GRD II are just arrived to Denmark (I got one of them;-)) and the GT-1 are not available yet.
    How are the prices in your country - the same as GW-1 or...???

    Cheers
    Ellemand
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellemand/

  7. #7
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by ellemand View Post
    Hey out there.
    The GRD II are just arrived to Denmark (I got one of them;-)) and the GT-1 are not available yet.
    How are the prices in your country - the same as GW-1 or...???

    Cheers
    Ellemand
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellemand/
    Ellemand,
    The GW-1 run about 199$, at least mine did. The GT-1 ran about 147$US.
    A bargain, really
    Edit; they are the same price; 147USD at Pop flash. My Ricoh-Dealer-of-Choice
    Last edited by Lili; 3rd February 2008 at 06:55.

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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by ellemand View Post
    Hey out there.
    The GRD II are just arrived to Denmark (I got one of them;-)) and the GT-1 are not available yet.
    How are the prices in your country - the same as GW-1 or...???

    Cheers
    Ellemand
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellemand/
    you can try my guy in Paris if you're looking for somewhere slightly closer. I think list is €149, but he usually does a deal. He has the VF available as well. You can tell him that I sent you. And mention Mitch as well -- tell him it was in a photography forum. Marcel alway get in everything from Ricoh earlier than most of Europe. He speaks quite good english although it's a little more difficult over the phone.

    L'INSTANTANE
    40, Bd Beaumarchais
    75011 PARIS

    Téléphone : +33 (0) 1.43.55.02.32
    Speak to Marcel

  9. #9
    wbrandsma
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Hi Ellemand,
    At http://www.verkoop.net in the Netherlands I saw the following prices.
    GW-1: €115,43
    GT-1: €92,23

  10. #10
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    The idea of a GR40 is simply that it would complement, not replace, the GR with a 28 mm EFOV.

    I'll post a couple 40 mm examples when I finish getting my computer sorted out.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  11. #11
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Yes, the idea of a GRD40 is attractive for photographers that want to shoot primarily at this focal length. But for others the current solution of wide- and tele-converters for the GRD/GRD2 is quite a god solution, particularly as the same converters work for the current, and I hope, future cameras.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  12. #12
    7ian7
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    I may be in the small category of GX100 owners who uses his camera primarily on the long end of the zoom. Yes, I have complained about its sharpness at certain apertures, but I still find it way more flattering than the wide end for shooting people close up.

    This past Sunday I shot 10 portraits for a series I'm making, using a bare strobe head and another head off to the side for a bit of highlight in the shadows. A Pocket Wizard in the hot shoe was used to trigger the lights. The lens was on it's 72mm (35 equiv) position all day long. Funny .. these pictures are the kind of work that could benefit (resolution-wise) from my dSLR or something even deeper, like the Hasselblad, but I truly love how having so little camera between me and my subjects changes the dynamic of the sitting. Using the Ricoh was definitely a choice.

    Sooooo .... I'd really love a GRD prime model that makes more of a commitment to portraiture — anywhere from 50 to 90, or beyond — with wide-angle available in a conversion attachment lens. Sort of the reverse of the current philosophy. Or a 50 prime, with a fast, fantastic 105 conversion attachment.

    Anyway, for whatever reason, these days I'm quite hopeful about our prospects for a wider array of choices from a variety of manufacturers in the not so distant future. I've heard talk of a Nikon digital rangefinder. There's the DP1. Ricoh is doing fantastic work, and is undoubtedly largely responsible for the fanaticism that may inspire its competitors to get back in to the game. It reminds me a bit of the revolution when native systems for audio and film editing became viable in the early '00s. Good times.

  13. #13
    Hypnohare
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    I happened to be in Manhattan a few hours ago. And on an impulse I purchased the 40mm tele-converter and the small GV-2 viewfinder (as well as the newer model leather case). I'm not sure how much I'll use the 40mm lens. But I absolutely love the optical viewfinder, Wow.

    Incidentally, I did try the older GV-1 finder and I was surprised at how well the GV-2 worked even thought it is a lot smaller than the GV-1.

    My only concern is how I am going to keep from losing that little plastic plug that goes into the hot shoe, or the lens ring. Can a person purchase one of those items from Ricoh??

  14. #14
    Senior Member simonclivehughes's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Just curious , but why be concerned about it? Very few cameras even have a hotshoe cover. The lens ring OTOH is available from Tony at PopFlash.

  15. #15
    Hypnohare
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    I just figured the plastic cover would protect the contacts. But perhaps I am too concerned over nothing?

    Thanks for the info on the rings!!

  16. #16
    Hypnohare
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    OK, Now that a spend a day in streets of New York, with the GV-2 viewfinder, I just can't imagine using the GR II without it, especially in low light situations, when I am forced to shoot at a slower shutter speed.

    So I retract my earlier statement about the plastic cover for the hot shoe contacts. I now have a permanent hot shoe cover, it is the GV-2 viewfinder!

  17. #17
    Hypnohare
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    For instance, there is no way I could have held these images steady at 1/6 second (f2.4, ISO 100, 28mm) without sticking the viewfinder tightly against my eye!

  18. #18
    Senior Member simonclivehughes's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Beautiful shots, and with amazing clarity for the shutter speed. Well done!

  19. #19
    Senior Member nostatic's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    This is a stunning shot. It has been haunting me since I first saw it.

  20. #20
    Hypnohare
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by simonclivehughes View Post
    Beautiful shots, and with amazing clarity for the shutter speed. Well done!
    Thanks Clive!!!

    Although I shot it in RAW, those posted photos are the Jpegs from the camera without post-processing. The only thing I did was reduce size of the images in order to make it easier to upload.

    I must say I really, LOVE this new GR II.

    And every photographer I show it to wants to purchase one, after I demonstrate the excellent manual control user interface.

    Oh yes, there is one thing that I forgot to mention. Even thought I am handholding the camera, I set the self timer to 2 seconds. So hold the viewfinder to my eye and trip the shutter. Then I try to steady myself as the self-timer goes off. If I don't do this, I get a little jitter as my finger trips the shutter.

  21. #21
    Senior Member simonclivehughes's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Ah, excellent tip about the 2-second timer delay. I'll have to try that. Typically, I carry a small home-made leather beanbag and/or a Manfrotto table-top tripod for shots this slow. Although I can see a bit of posterization in the top picture's sky, it may be due to the reduced size, I just got my GRDII yesterday so I'm looking forward to trying out this weekend. I always shoot RAW but I've got the jpg set to fine, so I'll have a look at them.

    Cheers,

  22. #22
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Hypnohare View Post
    OK, Now that a spend a day in streets of New York, with the GV-2 viewfinder, I just can't imagine using the GR II without it, especially in low light situations, when I am forced to shoot at a slower shutter speed...
    All this is personal preference: I like shooting using the LCD monitor much better, which I feel gives a looser, more fluid, shooting style. I just use the LCD to establish the edges of the frame and usually look directly at the subject when pressing the shutter.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  23. #23
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by nostatic View Post
    This is a stunning shot. It has been haunting me since I first saw it.
    Thanks for the the kind words; I like this portrait as well. This young woman usually has a happy face with a broad smile; but when I shot a dozen pictures of her she posed with a more brooding, moody look, that revealed much more depth to her personality, the happier look being the public face that we usually wear.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  24. #24
    Senior Member Will's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Ordered a GT-1 today. Should help with portraits.

    Does my nose look big in this lens? (28mm)


  25. #25
    VladimirV
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    I got my lens today and went out during lunch to take some shots and am really impressed with the quality. There is flare but only in a few shots and at certain angles. I will post some images later today.

  26. #26
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Does my nose look big in this lens? (28mm)

    Can you repeat the question Pinocchio /
    All the Best.......

  27. #27
    Senior Member Will's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Yes it does look big in this lens

  28. #28
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Here are four more pictures taken with the GRD2 and the 40mm tele-converter to give more of an idea of the quality of this lens and to bring this thread back on topic:


    ISO 400




    ISO 200




    ISO 200




    ISO 400



    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  29. #29
    Player
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Nice shots Mitch!

    You have an eye for the pretty ladies too.

  30. #30
    Super Duper
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Lovely shots Mitch.
    It appears you are settling in nicely with the GT-1!

  31. #31
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Thanks, Player; thanks Lili.

    Perhaps I should mention something about the difference in shooting with a 40 and a 28mm EFL lens. Obviously the feeling of space created by these two focal length is quite different, as you can see from a picture of the same young market woman as in the last picture above that I took a month ago with the GRD2 (28mm EFL):

    ISO 800



    What I find interesting now is that, having got so used to street photography with the 28mm EFL, a focal length I simply did not used before getting a GRD some 18 months ago, I find that now I'm so used to coming in very close to shoot. This means that I now feel "cramped" with the 40mm EFL in that I've usually come in too close for the type of shot that I want with this lens. This is really why the 28mm EFL is so good for street photography: being closer you tend to "understand" and observe the action or the scene better, which can lead to better pictures. But the longer focal length is particularly good for certain types of portraits and for situations in which you simply cannot get as close as you need for a wider angle lens.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  32. #32
    Hypnohare
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    All this is personal preference: I like shooting using the LCD monitor much better, which I feel gives a looser, more fluid, shooting style. I just use the LCD to establish the edges of the frame and usually look directly at the subject when pressing the shutter.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Yes, Mitch, I also like to shoot with the LCD, especially when I want to be quick and discreet. But if I am in low-light and without a tripod, I have been getting better results with the optical viewfinder. In any case, I will keep the GV-2 on the camera, so I can be prepared for any occasion and the new GC-2 case makes it very easy to carry everything safely.

    I did recently purchase the 40mm lens, But I have not yet been inspired to use it. Perhaps it's because I spent the last three years with a pocket camera with a 38mm lens and at the moment I am going crazy with the wide angle look of the Ricoh's built-in 28mm prime?

    Anyhow, I love what you are doing with the Black & White, your pictures just look great!!!

    I have very little experience with shooting monochrome (although I loved studying Ansel Adams books, especially "the Negative" when I was a young man), but unfortunately I spent most of my time with color film.

    Looking at your photos makes me want to explore the B&W capability of the GR II more than I have.

  33. #33
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    This is really why the 28mm EFL is so good for street photography: being closer you tend to "understand" and observe the action or the scene better, which can lead to better pictures. But the longer focal length is particularly good for certain types of portraits and for situations in which you simply cannot get as close as you need for a wider angle lens.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Hi Mitch,

    Specifically, and I imagine that this is what you meant, that is why the 28 works better for you personally. A century of photography, however, has shown us what it possible with 35 and 50 mm lenses when one is photographing people in public places. "Cramped" is in the eye of the beholder. Kertesz was far from cramped with a 50, for example.

    To use a 28 up close, one also has to accept, and like, a good amount of perspective exaggeration (which we tend to read as distortion). That's a personal call as well.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Last edited by Sean_Reid; 8th February 2008 at 11:29.

  34. #34
    Senior Member Will's Avatar
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Mitch I find your 40mm images tend more towards a feeling of intimacy than the 28mm, I wonder if that is the effect of your not having fully adjusted to the lens yet or if it is a fundamental difference between the focal lengths?

    Oh, and thanks for bringing us back on topic.

  35. #35
    Arch
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    This thread is getting rather interesting in many respects. People are happily surprised to find the new perspectives offered by the wide and tele converters attached to their pocket cameras. Yet, their pocket cameras are no longer pocket cameras, and their lovely prime lenses with their faultless optical engineering are being destroyed by compromise quality extra glass.

    It seems to me that the Leica heritage is playing a central role here, again. Prime lenses are, of course, and still, the state of the art, but a lot of water has run under the bridge since zoom lenses were a synonym of mediocre optical quality. The minor optical distortions unavoidable with the zoom lenses (barrel/pincushion) can now be taken care of by post processing, which we do anyway.

    When zoom is accepted, the step zoom, like the on Ricoh GX100, is given a big hand, mainly because it's almost like using prime lenses with their familiar focal lengths (I see the point with the optical viewfinders, but who really wants to buy all four of them and change them all the time? Yet, I'd love to see which focal length I'm using also with the normal zoom).

    Another thread here is asking if we walk or zoom. Sometimes the space gets too limited for us to walk, and zooming becomes a very attractive option. Without zoom, we are forced to ask: do you crop? Another tough question for the Leica traditionalists. Cropping a digital image? Isn't it like using the d i g i t a l z o o m ?

    Lovely Thai pics, again.

  36. #36
    Super Duper
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Arch View Post
    This thread is getting rather interesting in many respects. People are happily surprised to find the new perspectives offered by the wide and tele converters attached to their pocket cameras. Yet, their pocket cameras are no longer pocket cameras, and their lovely prime lenses with their faultless optical engineering are being destroyed by compromise quality extra glass.



    It seems to me that the Leica heritage is playing a central role here, again. Prime lenses are, of course, and still, the state of the art, but a lot of water has run under the bridge since zoom lenses were a synonym of mediocre optical quality. The minor optical distortions unavoidable with the zoom lenses (barrel/pincushion) can now be taken care of by post processing, which we do anyway.

    When zoom is accepted, the step zoom, like the on Ricoh GX100, is given a big hand, mainly because it's almost like using prime lenses with their familiar focal lengths (I see the point with the optical viewfinders, but who really wants to buy all four of them and change them all the time? Yet, I'd love to see which focal length I'm using also with the normal zoom).

    Another thread here is asking if we walk or zoom. Sometimes the space gets too limited for us to walk, and zooming becomes a very attractive option. Without zoom, we are forced to ask: do you crop? Another tough question for the Leica traditionalists. Cropping a digital image? Isn't it like using the d i g i t a l z o o m ?

    Lovely Thai pics, again.
    Arch, the GW-1 and GT-1 really give very high optical quality, while they do add bulk they do not 'destroy' anything at all.

  37. #37
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Thanks, Hypnohare.

    Sean, yes, I'm expressing my own preferences here. It's certainly true that in the 1930s through 1950s, and even well into the 1960s, is was the 35 and 50mm lenses that were used for most street photography, but don't forget that while Leica made it's first 28mm lens (the f6.3 Hektor) in 1935 it didn't make another one (the f5.6 Summaron) until twenty years later, in 1955; and they produced their first fast 28mm (the f2.8 Elmarit) only in 1965. Ralph Gibson wrote or said in an interview that he preferred a more natural feeling of space than produced by wide-angle lenses, that he preferred to create the space himself rather than have a "lensy" space — and, indeed, it's quite difficult to produce a Ralph Gibson type of picture with a lens wider than 50mm. In my own case, not having looked much at Winogrand, I got interested in the 28mm and 21mm focal length after studying the work of Moriyama Daido. And when I started to use the 28mm EFL of the GRD I found it hard going at first.


    Quote Originally Posted by Will View Post
    Mitch I find your 40mm images tend more towards a feeling of intimacy than the 28mm, I wonder if that is the effect of your not having fully adjusted to the lens yet or if it is a fundamental difference between the focal lengths?...
    Will, I don't think that it's a difference between the focal lengths that accounts for this; rather, it's how you approach the subject because you can achieve intimacy with the 28 and 21mm EFLs as well, as in the following picture taken with the GRD2 at 28mm EFL at ISO 1600:





    And here's an example with the 21mm converter on the GRD (ISO 64):





    The effect, that is, the degree of intimacy achieved with wide-angle lenses depends often on how you treat the space: closing up the back plane as in the two pictures above will enhance the closeness, or intimacy, if you will. But, that is not a hard and fast rule, as you can see in some of Bill Brandt's portraits taken with the Hasselblad SWC, like the one of Francis Bacon, which has intimacy despite the perspective going off into infinity. Therefore, I think it's all in the feeling the photograopher has for the subject and how he frames this.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  38. #38
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Arch View Post
    ...Yet, their pocket cameras are no longer pocket cameras, and their lovely prime lenses with their faultless optical engineering are being destroyed by compromise quality extra glass...
    Thanks, Arch.

    Yes, my mother always taught me that converter lenses were crummy pieces of glass that destroyed the look of the fine lens to which they were attached. But she was wrong: the 21mm wide-converter and the 40mm tele-converter are excellent lenses and don't compromise the quality of the original 28mm EFL lens: that is what I was trying to show in the examples above. To me, the quality of the 21mm converter is simply astounding and the 40mm is also excellent, although it sometimes has a bit of flare that I don't find to be a problem — there was no fare in the pictures above. It certainly flares a lot less than the DR-Summicron, one of my favorite lenses for the Leica-M.

    As for pocketability, the tele-converter (the GT-1), like the 21mm wide-converter (the GW-1) needs a little "barrel" to be mounted on the GRD or GRD2. Wearing the camera in its case on my belt I can carry the GT-1, GW-1 and the barrel in my left trouser pocket — and a spare battery in my back pocket. Once either converter is mounted on the camera it becomes too big to be pocketable, although it would still fit in a largish jacket packet; but it's too hot in Bangkok to wear a jacket.

    Once you have the GT-1 mounted on the camera you can simply unscrew it and leave the barrel on if you want to shoot at 28mm EFL, and then you can also screw on the GW-1 and easily switch between the latter and the GT-1: this makes it convenient to swtich between the three focal lengths.

    An unrelated thought: I really like the 40mm focal length, which is one that Mike Johnston once raved about and wrote about extensively and eloquently— in better days when he wasn't burying himself in his blog. (No offense, in the sense that I've written him a couple of times that with his talent for writing he could do a lot more interesting things as his main activity than maintain a blog, but let's stay on topic...) The 40mm lens combines properties or capabilities of the 35 and 50mm focal length and, therefore, is a good complement to the 28 and 21mm focal length that the GRD and GRD2 already have. I like the choice of focal lengths that Ricoh Camera has made because the 35mm focal length is close to 28mm — and thus having the choice of 21, 28 and 40 is very useful, as it obviates the need for the 35 and 50mm focal lenghts, as least for me, as I don't like to use to many lenses — with my Leica M6 I found that the number of good pictures I managed to take was inversely proportional to the number of lenses I carried any particular day.

    Although it may be obvious, the choice of the 21, 28 and 40mm EFL is a very practical solution for extending the flexibility of these cameras; and the ability to use the wide and tele converters on both the old GRD and the new GRD2 is a welcome development.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Last edited by Mitch Alland; 8th February 2008 at 17:44.

  39. #39
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Arch View Post
    (I see the point with the optical viewfinders, but who really wants to buy all four of them and change them all the time? Yet, I'd love to see which focal length I'm using also with the normal zoom).
    Me...I do and did. But I also don't change focal lengths all the time.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  40. #40
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    Thanks, Hypnohare.

    Sean, yes, I'm expressing my own preferences here. It's certainly true that in the 1930s through 1950s, and even well into the 1960s, is was the 35 and 50mm lenses that were used for most street photography
    Hi Mitch,

    ....Also 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and our present decade. Why did you stop at the 1960s? But strong work is timeless and the contention between form and content is exactly the same now as it was when we were drawing on cave walls.

    As I think you might agree, there's no best format, no best focal length, no best aspect ratio, etc. There's the just the photographer, the subject and whatever tools he or she chooses to use to mediate between the two. A good friend of mine is doing outstanding work on the streets of NYC with a 90 on an R-D1.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  41. #41
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean_Reid View Post
    ....Also 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and our present decade. Why did you stop at the 1960s? But strong work is timeless and the contention between form and content is exactly the same now as it was when we were drawing on cave walls.

    As I think you might agree, there's no best format, no best focal length, no best aspect ratio, etc. There's the just the photographer, the subject and whatever tools he or she chooses to use to mediate between the two. A good friend of mine is doing outstanding work on the streets of NYC with a 90 on an R-D1...
    Sean, I stopped with the 1960s as that was when 28mm lenses started to become more common. It's because I agree with you that there is no best focal length or format that I referred to Ralph Gibson statement on his preference for "natural" rather than "lensy" space.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  42. #42
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    28s became more common but 35s, 50s, etc. remained, and remain, central to small camera photography.

    I like 40s too. Here's a rough print (because I'm still sorting out a new computer system) from the subway pictures. I did that whole project, over several years, with a 40.

    Cheers,

    Sean
    Last edited by Sean_Reid; 8th February 2008 at 22:03.

  43. #43
    Super Duper
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    My first "real" camera was a Canon GIII QL-17 with a 40mm lens. It's a great focal length.

  44. #44
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    That's the camera. For the subway pictures, I used a brace of them instead of Leica Ms because I could give up a Canonet if I were mugged. Whereas a Leica.... I still have 4 or so QL-17s just sitting on a shelf.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  45. #45
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Fantastic little cameras aren't they?!?!

    I'd love to see a digital version. (I know, I've said that only about a million times!)

  46. #46
    Sean_Reid
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Put a compact 28 on an R-D1 and there you are - Canonet +.

    Cheers,

    Sean

  47. #47
    ellemand
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Having been away for some days, I'll thank you all for the answers about where to buy the GT-1.
    I would like to buy here in Denmark (guarantee etc.) but if I have to wait several months, I'll give the suggested alternatives a try.
    Thank you very much - have a nice weekend.

    Ellemand.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ellemand/
    Last edited by ellemand; 8th February 2008 at 23:09.

  48. #48
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Mitch, have you thought of using 2 GH-1 tubes? One for the 21 converter, one for the 40, and switch the whole converter-tube unit rather than screwing the converters in and out?

    Seems to me that switching converter-tubes would be faster? Or is the camera-tube connection too fragile for constant switching?

  49. #49
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Yes, that is possible; but it's just as easy to unscrew one converter and screw on the other. And having both converters on tubes just makes for more bulk to put in the trouser pocket.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  50. #50
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    Re: GRD2 with 40mm Tele-converter pictures

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick_Yoon View Post
    Mitch, have you thought of using 2 GH-1 tubes? One for the 21 converter, one for the 40, and switch the whole converter-tube unit rather than screwing the converters in and out?

    Seems to me that switching converter-tubes would be faster? Or is the camera-tube connection too fragile for constant switching?
    Having and using both the GT-1 and the GW-1 I can answer for this.
    I do have two GH-1's and it does make it far easier to mount these lenses to work this way.
    So you suggestion is a good one

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