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Thread: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

  1. #51
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Geez could not even come close to saying it that well and exactly my thoughts.

    Thank You BTW.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  2. #52
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Got it, nostatic! That makes sense: what I wasn't aware of was that imitation was rife elsewhere on the web.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  3. #53
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    What Mitch brings to the party like others here is inspire folks and that is what we want to be as a forum and photo community. I absolutely love the enthusiasm here about shooting. This is what we love when we teach a workshop is the enthusiasm that the folks bring. (sorry i brought up the workshop stuff again) Not intended.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  4. #54
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    I adore Mitch's style.
    But I appreciate the freedom to have my own.
    nostatic said this well.

    It was VERY foggy this morning

  5. #55
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Lili:

    What do you mean? Change that picture of yours into B&W — and you've got one of mine <grin>.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  6. #56
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    Lili:

    What do you mean? Change that picture of yours into B&W — and you've got one of mine <grin>.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    ROFL, true, but then it has no people, and those are your forte' Mitch
    My scenes tend to be deserted

  7. #57
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Actually, Lili, I'm beginning to be depressed about all my "walk-by shootings", which are startng to lead to a meaningless dead-end for my book project, and am thinking of taking more pictures of things:


    GRD ISO 200


    ... but I have enough fish — and beginning to feel like the ones below, in trying to figure where to take my book project now:


    DR Summicron | Neopan 1600 @ ISO 1000


    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  8. #58
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Loove that one Lili....
    You've seemed to capture an eeriness and the grain is Hot
    Cheers! helen

  9. #59
    Senior Member helenhill's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    Actually, Lili, I'm beginning to be depressed about all my "walk-by shootings", which are starting to lead to a meaningless dead-end for my book project, and am thinking of taking more pictures of things.... but I have enough fish — and beginning to feel like the ones below, in trying to figure where to take my book project now
    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    FANTASTIC Photos Mitch
    and I agree with your Quote....Do more pictures of Things-Cool Cheers! helen

  10. #60
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch,
    I see freshness still in your street shots, all these people, in an exotic place that is on my "bucket list''. I know I do not see with your eyes nor do I live in your skin. so I cannot dismiss your feelings or doubts on this though.
    This may sound unbelievably banal, but what are you trying to say with your book?
    What is your message?
    I suspect if you can codify that you might resolves these qualms.
    HUGZ

  11. #61
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by helenhill View Post
    Loove that one Lili....
    You've seemed to capture an eeriness and the grain is Hot
    Cheers! helen
    Thank you Helen, It was the only shot that really presented itself to me.
    I did not find it, it was handed to me on a platter

  12. #62
    Senior Member Robert Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    Mitch,

    This may sound unbelievably banal, but what are you trying to say with your book?
    What is your message?
    It's not at all banal, it's the core. What's the message, what are you trying to say? Are there too many messages for them to gel?

    You have the technique, now how does it and the message come together? It has to be more than a quasi-random selection of pix.

    Perhaps you could try some brainstorming - Kipling's list; KISS and as a metaphor from the US aero industry - SAAL - simplify and add lightness.
    Slαinte

    Robert.

  13. #63
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Somehow I missed reading Lili's post in which she asked what I'm trying to say in the book. Sorry, Lili, for not responding.

    Bertie and Lili, if you look at the slideshow of the 158 pictures currently there I think that you will see what I'm trying to say with the book, although granted that it would be easier to get the message by looking at the prints rather than at a flickr slideshow. I don't really believe in explaining what a photograph or a series of photographs say — I think that pictures should speak for themselves. Also, what pictures say differs to some degree according to the understanding and experience of the viewer and I believe that it is better for the the viewer to articulate what he or she sees, not for the photographer who already has said what he has to say in the pictures.

    I am not thrashing around for what to say with the book, I have thought this through for a long time: it's more a question of what pictures say what I want to say the best; and, also, to decide which are the best pictures for the book among the ones I have taken, or am about to take.

    I expect to finish an edit of the series by the end of the week, at least by adding about a dozen pictures if not deleting some — but the latter may take a little longer.


    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  14. #64
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Somehow I missed reading Lili's post in which she asked what I'm trying to say in the book. Sorry, Lili, for not responding.

    it is quite alright

    Bertie and Lili, if you look at the slideshow of the 158 pictures currently there I think that you will see what I'm trying to say with the book, although granted that it would be easier to get the message by looking at the prints rather than at a flickr slideshow. I don't really believe in explaining what a photograph or a series of photographs say — I think that pictures should speak for themselves. Also, what pictures say differs to some degree according to the understanding and experience of the viewer and I believe that it is better for the the viewer to articulate what he or she sees, not for the photographer who already has said what he has to say in the pictures.

    I am not thrashing around for what to say with the book, I have thought this through for a long time: it's more a question of what pictures say what I want to say the best; and, also, to decide which are the best pictures for the book among the ones I have taken, or am about to take.

    There is a saying that there are always two people in any image; the viewer and the photographer. Each brings a part of themselves into the act of creation and reacting to the image. When I suggested or asked if you had a message in mind I was trying to be of help with the doubts you expressed earlier. However it sounds and looks as if you have that goal clearly in mind

    I expect to finish an edit of the series by the end of the week, at least by adding about a dozen pictures if not deleting some — but the latter may take a little longer.

    Looking forward to the results

  15. #65
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Here are some more pictures shot with the GDR2 on Monday and Tuesday night. The first two were shot at on Monday with the 28mm EFL at ISO 1600 ar a huge club called "Hollywood" — it holds easily over a 1,000 people. The dancers are called "coyotes" — basically go-go dancers — who dance in intervals of the real show that has choreographed dancers. The job of the coyotes is rather harsh as, when not dancing, they walk around to cadge drinks from male customers, on which they get a 30% commission. They're very young, around 20, and a good number of them are college students, although it's really difficult to attend university when you're working every night from 10:00pm to 4:00am with one night off a month. The "coyote" name comes from the film "Coyote Ugly", an unremarkable movie that was hugely popular in Thailand because the song became a great hit.


    ISO 1600




    ISO 1600





    The following pictures were taken with the GT-1 tele-converter on Tuesday night at the same area as the pictures taken last Friday night.


    GT-1 | ISO 800




    GT-1 | ISO 1600




    GT-1 | ISO 1600




    Any thoughts on these pictures?

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  16. #66
    Hypnohare
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch:

    I think that the best artists have their own style and a look that sets them apart from the rest of the pack. That is why I can instantly tell when a painting was made by a Picasso, Leger, Jasper Johns, Lichtenstein or a Basquiat.

    Do to the look and subject matter of your pictures, I feel as though I can easily pick out one of your photos from a stack of a thousand images.

    Congratulations!

    Levent
    ---------------------------------

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  17. #67
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Levent, thanks for the kind words.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  18. #68
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch, very nice Show Shots.
    Suits your style very very well.

    My homage to your style

  19. #69
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    I expect to finish an edit of the series by the end of the week, at least by adding about a dozen pictures if not deleting some — but the latter may take a little longer.

    Looking forward to the results
    Lili: I've finished the edit, by adding almost thirty pictures, deleting a couple and rearranging a few. You can see the results on my flickr slideshow (183 pictures):

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/show/

    But watching a long slide on flickr can be painful. Therefore, if anyone is interested in seeing this book project — including the — in a better way please send me a Private Message here and I'll send you back the url and password for my iDisk Public Folder from where you can download a zip file (55.5MB) with JPGs of all the pictures that you can view in your picture viewing programme: on the Mac it's Preview, or better yet you can you GraphicConverter — in either the JPGs will appear in the intended sequence.

    If you look at the project please let me know your reaction here, the good, the bad and the ugly.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/show/

  20. #70
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    I like the one with the spoon in the girl's mouth. Something makes me keep coming back to that one out of the series.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  21. #71
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Lili View Post
    Mitch, very nice Show Shots.
    Suits your style very very well.

    My homage to your style
    That's cool, Lili! Is that at ISO 800?

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/show/
    Last edited by Mitch Alland; 13th March 2008 at 07:33.

  22. #72
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Thanks Mitch!
    it was shot at ISO 1600, 5.9mm, 1/9 second at f2.4

  23. #73
    Senior Member nostatic's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Mancuso View Post
    I like the one with the spoon in the girl's mouth. Something makes me keep coming back to that one out of the series.
    Totally agree. The one above it is softly haunting, as opposed to another favorite portrait of yours which had a stronger sense of ennui.

    I'd gladly walk through the photos from the zip file. I'm in the process of trying to wrangle at least 70 images of my own to match up to 70 poems that I've written (for a book project), so I'm sensitive to the process and the need for some outside editorial comment.

  24. #74
    Administrator, Instructor Guy Mancuso's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Maybe the forum can help. Maybe post a few that you are stuck on and maybe see what folks think what poem should go with it. Maybe fun and also may help you.
    Photography is all about experimentation and without it you will never learn art.

    www.guymancusophotography.com

  25. #75
    Mitch Alland
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    Statistics from the College of Useless Knowledge

    For whomever is interested, the 183 pictures in my book project shown in my flickrs slideshow were made with the following cameras:

    48 pictures — Leica M6 (Mainly Tri-X, and HP5+ and Neopan 1600)
    50 pictures — Ricoh GRD
    10 pictures — Leica D-Lux-3
    33 pictures — Ricoh GX100
    41 pictures — Ricoh GRD2
    1 picture — Leica V-Lux-1

    As noted in a post above the url for the flickr slideshow is:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/show/

    But watching a long slide on flickr can be painful. Therefore, if anyone is interested in seeing this book project — including the title — in a better way please send me a Private Message here and I'll send you back the url and password for my iDisk Public Folder from where you can download a zip file (55.5MB). Excuse for repeating this information, but it's just my paranoia that people didn't see the post above because it got caught up in a sudden flurry of posts here.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  26. #76
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Ugh, in the posting above I inserted the wrong link for the book project url, which should be:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/1026877...71568487/show/

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  27. #77
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch I went through your slideshow last night and I am VERY Impressed

  28. #78
    7ian7
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch, your edit as of 730pm Friday NYC-time looks fantastic.

    Great additions. A fully-realized and deep picture of your experience, and simultaneously, of life for your subjects in Bangkok.

    I'm not convinced this is the final sequencing, but that's ... besides the point.

    Also, there are a small handful where the post-processing shows — a few faces where dodging reaches a cloudy place that could be corrected with a quick blast of contrast to bring back the blacks. You'll be happier getting those few to match the standard you've set in the rest of the images.

    But that's nitpicking, too. This is a strong, personal collection of work that deserves an audience.

    I hope this inspiring edit inspires you to kind of run around the bases one more time — shoot a bunch more, especially if you want nothing more than to be done, and especially especially if think you are.

    There's a fine book here already; what a freeing place from which to dig out a handful more pictures.

    Kudos!

  29. #79
    Senior Member Robert Campbell's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch,
    Thanks for sending me the URL: alas, although I could get to the file a combination of windoze, Internet Explorer and my incompetence meant that I couldn't download it...I suppose that admitting in public that I am not a mac user destroys any street cred that I might have had...

    I've looked through on Flickr a couple of times - not a problem with our very high speed access, and also got my wife to have a look. She thought the pix showed a very dark side to Bangkok, and used the words 'decadent' and 'spoilt' [meaning spoilt by western influences]. She also explained the relevance of the nudes - but then she is a gynaecologist.

    I am very left-brained when it comes to artistic impressions, so I won't try...but I did see a coherent body of work, even if I didn't fully understand it - but that is my difficulty, not a failure of the artist. Others have suggested some technical refinements - again I wouldn't dare comment.

    A previous commentator - I think it was Lili - said that there were two people involved in looking a picture - the artist or author and the viewer. True enough, but there is an intermediate viewer - the agent or publisher. It is these people who you now have to impress with the significance, importance and viability of your project - not only those here who can give an artistic appraisal. You have mentioned editing the pix for your final version: an agent might well wish to see further evidence of your work [if they haven't already] - and you might well find that you have to make some compromises with respect to the final content.

    Best wishes for a positive outcome!
    Last edited by Robert Campbell; 15th March 2008 at 14:46. Reason: tpyos
    Slαinte

    Robert.

  30. #80
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Campbell View Post
    ...I've looked through on Flickr a couple of times - not a problem with our very high speed access, and also got my wife to have a look. She thought the pix showed a very dark side to Bangkok, and used the words 'decadent' and 'spoilt' [meaning spoilt by western influences]. She also explained the relevance of the nudes - but then she is a gynaecologist.

    I am very left-brained when it comes to artistic impressions, so I won't try...but I did see a coherent body of work, even if I didn't fully understand it - but that is my difficulty, not a failure of the artist...

    A previous commentator - I think it was Lili - said that there were two people involved in looking a picture - the artist or author and the viewer. True enough, but there is an intermediate viewer - the agent or publisher. It is these people who you now have to impress with the significance, importance and viability of your project - not only those here who can give an artistic appraisal. You have mentioned editing the pix for your final version: an agent might well wish to see further evidence of your work [if they haven't already] - and you might well find that you have to make some compromises with respect to the final content.
    Bertie, you raise some interesting points. Your wife is right: it is meant as a dark vision of Bangkok: Thailand as a real place with real people as opposed to the automatons conjured up by the trite "Land of Smiles" tourism campaigns. There are few smiling Thais in these pictures, although there are some girls laughing almost hysterically. The series is meant to portray life in a huge, chaotic tropical city in which life for most people is difficult: for example, working people often have to commute to work 1-1/2 - 2 hours each way, changing buses three or four times; they have financial pressure, etc.; and life can often be harsh. Also, I have been interested in how you portray a tragic sense through photography — and don't know whether this book can accomplish that, but I've made a bit of an effort to do so.

    I don't know about "decadent", but let's consider "spoilt": on one level everything everywhere is "spoilt" throughout the world. When I went to Phuket the first time, years ago before there were any international hotels and basically no toursit, we stayed on in a beach shack and slept in mosquito netting. The shack we stayed in was the only structure on some half mile of beach, at one end of which there was a fishing village where we could buy fish. At that time we ate turtle eggs — they're eaten raw with vinegar, lime, garlic and chillies and are delicious — which are now protected as an endangered species. Today, Phuket is a major tourist centre and it is spoilt. But that is true of everywhere because the alternative not to spoiling things is to be like Burma — and the people of Burma would rather have development like Thailand than their present poverty.

    On another level, the idea of being "spoilt" in terms of Western influence is, I'm afraid a Western, and superficial, perception. In fact Thailand, is like Japan in that neither country was colonized. Like the Japanese, the Thais maintain their own cultural identity, appropriating from the West what they wish: superficially, there is strong Western influence, but scratch just a little below this surface the local cultural identity, like in Japan is very strong.

    On the final point on dealing with a publisher, that is a bridge that I'll have to cross when I get to it; in the meantime I have to satisfy myself with the book.

    —Mitch/Huahin
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  31. #81
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by 7ian7 View Post
    Mitch, your edit as of 730pm Friday NYC-time looks fantastic.

    Great additions. A fully-realized and deep picture of your experience, and simultaneously, of life for your subjects in Bangkok.

    I'm not convinced this is the final sequencing, but that's ... besides the point.

    Also, there are a small handful where the post-processing shows — a few faces where dodging reaches a cloudy place that could be corrected with a quick blast of contrast to bring back the blacks. You'll be happier getting those few to match the standard you've set in the rest of the images.

    But that's nitpicking, too. This is a strong, personal collection of work that deserves an audience.

    I hope this inspiring edit inspires you to kind of run around the bases one more time — shoot a bunch more, especially if you want nothing more than to be done, and especially especially if think you are.

    There's a fine book here already; what a freeing place from which to dig out a handful more pictures.

    Kudos!
    Ian, although we've now corresponded on your posting by Personal Mail, I thought I should also respond here so other people can follow the conversation. First, thank you for your reaction, which I value highly having seen your own fantastic pictures.

    I see what you mean about the monk picture: the funny thing is that every time I saw this photograph I had a subliminal feeling that it was too evenly gray — I now have increased the contrast and, having a bit of almost highlight on his forehead and a bit of almost black on his cheek, as well as a some more contrast in the background as well, improves it. Interesting, how a basically small change in contrast can make a big improvement, no different from the darkroom. Thanks for the tip: I'll have to go through the rest of the pictures from this point of view.

    On adding more pictures, I'm still in the mood to take some more pictures for some of the themes of the book; and therefe am likely to continue doing so. After adding some more I may end up deleting a few of the current ones.

    —Mitch/Huanhin
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  32. #82
    7ian7
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Nice, Mitch. Thank you.

    For anyone wondering, the last thing I meant to do was criticize Mitch.

    In the past when I've worked on big collections of images, over the course of solving problematic aspects of individual pictures, I've sometimes lost elements of the feel of the overall body of work that would help a particular image sit better in context with the others.

    The "problems" may be worth solving — often to retain some piece of information that is under or overexposed — but not at the expense of having the correction stand out or the image appear softer than the others. For me, it sometimes requires having it pointed out by one of my eagle-eyed overly-competitive photographer friends who find it impossible to utter a compliment (thanks guys!) before I recognize or face up to what I kinda already know ... which is that if I go back to some of these tough ones, I can often do them a bit more justice.

    The other thing is, changing tools along the way is impacting the look and feel of Mitch's pictures as well, so decisions can (should?) be made about the importance of continuity in that regard.

    Getting this many images into presentable form is a big accomplishment in itself. I can't remember if it's here or via PM's, but I think (hope) I am heaping a lot of unabashed praise in Mitch's direction. I still think that's worth more than any of the technical stuff.

  33. #83
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Ian, criticism is no problem: what you said was very helpful in that it's made me see the need to tweak a few of the pictures and has also made me realise, as stated in my last posting, that even a minor tweak can make a big difference in the impact of a photograph.

    Your comments also raise several interesting issues for a large project like a book. One is consistency of style over a long period — this project has been going on for 2-1/2 years — during which the photographer may find that the visual interest, the look that he likes, may change or evolve or that he changes the equipment that he uses. The latter may happen more now in the digital age but was also a factor earlier as, even a photographer kept on shooting with the same camera, he might have acquired lenses that drew differently, or started using different types of film with different developers. The question really comes to what constitutes "a style" or how much variety in appearance a style can bear and still remain a style. That, it seems to me, depends on the nature of the style itself: a book by John Sexton would have a more narrow stylistic range than a book by Moriyama Daido, whose style I would call expressionist. In some of Moriyama's books there is a wide variety of look, some of the pictures having huge grain, possibly being a crop from a small proportion of the negative, while others have fine grain.

    In what what I have been trying to do — expressive prints for a statement involving a dark look that portrays life in a huge, chaotic tropical city — I've been increasingly trying to shoot in a "loose", fluid style because I feel an "exquisite" look with beautiful light and fine tonal gradations simply would not be expressive enough for what I wanted to express; with such a style I feel that a wide variety of look is possible and still be a style. For example in the following picture, posted in another thread, I have intentionally blown out the highlights around the woman and let the background go to very high contrast, even though the raw file did not have blown highlights, because I wanted to express the heat and harsh light of the city around midday:





    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  34. #84
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    I thought that i would add the following new picture to this thread because I like it and think that it fits in with the theme of the book project (GRD2 at ISO 400):





    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  35. #85
    Senior Member ecliffordsmith's Avatar
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Hi Mitch,

    I think the image above is very strong. Especially when taken in context of your demonstrating the hardships of daily life in the city. The traffic, building works, people and dog all combine to show a hectic place.

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    The temporal aspect of the book is interesting. Art is never created (or consumed) in a vacuum, and I find that the best work will speak to me in different ways over time. Of course the creation process is rife with choices...usually way too many.

    For my project I'm cheating and going chronologically with the text for the first pass. I may match images from roughly the same time, if nothing else, to do the personal experiment of seeing if word and image correlate (egad, the scientist in me creeps out).

    I'm sorry I haven't had a chance to walk through your images yet (this pesky day job), but perhaps the evolution can be used to your advantage? It is one way of sequencing things, although it might not make visual sense. Then again, does it have to make sense?

    A friend of mine has an interesting way to listen to music. He has a large itunes library, and he'll do a search for a common word like "house" or "love" or "rain", and then itunes will pull all the songs matching that metadata. And there is the playlist. Depending how diverse the metadata is, the playlist actually will be more eclectic than one might think, as it is looking at more than song titles.

    The analogy here is that perhaps instead of thinking sequences, you think about the meta data around the image. Maybe it is time, place, subject, object. For instance everything with a street sign. Or everyone wearing white shirts. Or white shoes. It is an old social scientist trick to try and find patterns and overlaps.

    I don't know...I'm just riffing. I can't seem to find a spare moment to sit down and hammer on my stuff, so I wax philosophic on the interwebs. The bottom line is that your images are quite potent, and I think it will work with any number of sequences and approaches. They are strong enough to stand on their own.

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    I do this all the time. Label the images with various crazy metadata, and then create smart albums. Lucky thing Aperture works like Itunes in this respect. I've only done it for fun, but can imagine this to be useful in a large project.

    Not exactly on topic, but I got the 40 mm adapter inspired by Mitch's photos. It is great, but it does flare an awful lot. Flare is visible on the screen, but only clearly in color, and avoiding it does add an extra unwanted ingredient to taking photos. Admittedly, in B&W it doesn't cause that much of a problem, but still, it's stronger than I expected

    Mitch, also got a Moriyama Daido retrospective inspired by your advertisements, for way too much money. But it's awesome stuff.

  38. #88
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Ed, thanks — I see this picture the same way you do.

    Nostatic and Sizifo, my sequences are not chronological but relate to a type of narrative that is, on the one hand, based on the general themes of each of the four chapters, and on the other hand, within the chapters, based on a cyclical approach to what is in the other chapters: this description is not going to make sense unless you look carefully at the book. Of course, the sequences are also based on the visual relationships and echos of the images to each other.

    Looking and labeling metadata does not help with this type of sequencing approach: in structuring this you just have to look at the pictures and see what resonates with you for inclusion in the book and how one picture relates to the whole; not something that the computer can do for you, however you label your metadata. And the photographs have to be able to stand on their own: if they are not good enough to stand on their own they shouldn't be in the book.

    Sizifo, on the 40mm tele-conveter, althogh it is subject to flare, I don't find the flare that frequent and when it has been there it's been in pictures in which I would anyway would introduce vignetting in post-processing in order to bring out the subject, which is why the flare hasn't bothered me.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Last edited by Mitch Alland; 18th March 2008 at 17:36.

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    While this thread has drifted, it's been interesting... especially for Mitch's new perspective on the GRD2; that is, it's still the photog, not the gear.

    An ardent promoter of the GRD through his works, I still feel he can get the shot from the "First Version" gear, regardless the "New Love" he's found... an image maker, and that's key.

    Having used a few Small Sensor rigs, but mostly film until recently(and varied rangefinders, including Oly XA), I too am well pleased with this GRD2... not only for the pics, but that I've taken a few tumbles while BC/Piste skiing and it comes up with a smile bigger than mine! Not for the falls, but I'd take this kit in the Backcountry well before others: great image capability, and easy to use with gloves(if needs must)... yes, that power button LED helps

    Best of all, but taking time to adjust to, is the size... as large as most mobile phones, but the pics!

    rgds,
    Dave

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    I'll attempt one, hopefully constructive critique, about the collection for the book. Let me first say that I am more than impressed by your project as a whole.

    Given that title is "Bangkok Hysteria", a minority of the photos don't seem to fit. Infact, for me they don't fit whatever the name of the collection. By these I mean some of the portraits of the people that you seem to know (e.g. sitting across from you on the table), the leaves, some of the nudes. In the sense that a lot of the photos give me an impression of the city, while the ones I'm referring to don't. They could have been shot in a wide variety of places, and simply don't have the feel given by the rest of the collection. Anyway, if you're interested, I can tell precisely which ones I mean.

    I'm not saying anything about the quality of these particular photos; some of them are among the best in the collection. They really struck me as out of place when going through the collection.

    Having said this, first impressions are sometimes insightful, because one hasn't had time to think too much, but can also be wrong because one is being too superficial. So apologies in advance if the latter is the case.

  41. #91
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Thanks for looking and for your comments, sizifo. I have a good idea of what you mean and the portraits that you are referring to, particularly the square one: the only thing that has kept that picture in the book is the darkness around the subject and her braces, but I'm still thinking about it. Another portrait shows a vulnerability that keeps it in. In contrast, the nudes, although they could be considered too stylized, work for me because of the sense of redemption or at least surcease that they adduce — carefully chosen word here — as do the leaves, but I don't want to go into an explanations of meanings and intentions because I feel that the pictures must speak for themselves.

    —Mitch/Bangkok
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    My problem was not so much with certain photos being stylized. As you say, even though they might be viewed so superficially, there is more to them.

    My comment was more mathematical. The vast majority of the photos capture the daily life in the city. Then there are 4 sub-themes: leaves, fish, nudes, and portraits, each of which has relatively few representatives. So when looking through the collection they cause a clash. While maybe one or two could be effective, as a kind of counterpoint to the street photos, in my opinion 4 is too many. This is despite the fact that, for me, each of the sub-themes on its own does convey an abstract impression of the city successfully.

  43. #93
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    sizifo, you have to look at the book as having four chapters, and there is a reason for each of themes being in each of the chapters. For me, it works.

    —Mitch/Windhoek

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Mitch, I finally got to walk through all the images. Of course I didn't have enough time to properly digest, but here are some very quick impressions...sometimes I find them to be helpful. Take them with a salt lick.

    I found the nudes jarring. Maybe that is the intent, and I know the reputation of Bangkok but there is something about them that takes me out of the flow and energy of the city.

    I liked the palm/fish signals for chapter transitions (at least that was my take on them). It did take me awhile to "get it" though (and maybe I didn't ).

    The opening image didn't "grab" me. The musician in me harkens back to a core mantra - people only remember your first note and your last note. I'm not sure what I'd replace it with, but for instance the above image of the people walking under the scaffold with the dirt and the dog going the other way hooks me more.

    Anyway, hopefully if I can clear my plate a bit more I can spend some more time walking through it. I love the stuff.

  45. #95
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Thanks. Nostatic. Replacing the first picture with the one above could make sense, and I'll think about it.

    —Mitch/Tsumeb, Namibia
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    sizifo, you have to look at the book as having four chapters, and there is a reason for each of themes being in each of the chapters. For me, it works.

    —Mitch/Windhoek
    OK, I missed this... Makes things fall into place, and gives a sense to many of the photos I thought clashed.

    The only photos that I remain unconvinced about are the following nudes: 48.-mikari_back_cropped_v2 34e3.-miaw_venetian_adj 34d.-buttons_v2 29a.-mikari_showoff_cropped 17.-miaw_nude_cropped .

    With the chapters, the portraits work a lot better, though I can't say it's still works 100% for me.

    Hope I'm not giving a wrong impression here. These are very minor comments. A really really impressive collection. You have +1 customer for sure.

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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Alland View Post
    Thanks. Nostatic. Replacing the first picture with the one above could make sense, and I'll think about it.

    —Mitch/Tsumeb, Namibia
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
    Actually, on further review, I think something with a bit more chaos in it would be a good opener. The problem is I only know Bangkok through pictures so I'm guessing. Were it Hong Kong, Beijing or Shanghai I'd feel better about my recommendation. For me (a westerner) Bangkok is neon, bicycles/scooters, activity, neon, food, sex, and relentless. I guess if you add all that up you get hysteria

  48. #98
    Mitch Alland
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    Re: The GRD2 — An Appreciation

    Quote Originally Posted by sizifo View Post
    OK, I missed this... Makes things fall into place, and gives a sense to many of the photos I thought clashed.

    The only photos that I remain unconvinced about are the following nudes: 48.-mikari_back_cropped_v2 34e3.-miaw_venetian_adj 34d.-buttons_v2 29a.-mikari_showoff_cropped 17.-miaw_nude_cropped...
    Of course I see what you're saying, sizifo, but, for me, the difference in the feeling of the nudes — order, style, calm — has to do with what sex or love does, or at least what they can do, to one's psyche in the helter-skelter of life — and that's why I want these pictures in the bank: it's not really the idea of sex that tourists have about Thailand.

    —Mitch/Tsumeb, Namibia
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

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