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Thread: how to calculate fov with shift lens

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    how to calculate fov with shift lens

    I have a 35mm FD tilt shift lens for which I am awaiting an adapter.

    In the meantime is there anyway to calculate the fov if the lens is shifted say 7mm to both sides stitched together?

    It looks like it may be just about the same as it is on a full frame sensor which is a lot better than the 1.5 crop of the NEX but it would be even nicer if it were wider.

    Mike

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    Re: how to calculate fov with shift lens


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    Re: how to calculate fov with shift lens

    Quote Originally Posted by docmaas View Post
    ... is there any way to calculate the field of view if the lens is shifted say 7mm to both sides stitched together?
    Simply add 7 mm to both sides of your film/sensor size, i. e. 14 mm total, and then calculate the angle of view in the usual way for that. Simply think of it as using the lens on a film/sensor that is 14 mm wider than it nominally is.

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    Re: how to calculate fov with shift lens

    How did you decide on the shift lens that you bought and what do you want to use if for? I ask on account of those who say that post processing is good enough. I ask because shift lenses look so beautiful in terms of there mechanics and would love to buy one for architecture, but have not yet taken the plunge! And I have this fl fd canon adapter sitting around wanting to be useful.

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    Re: how to calculate fov with shift lens

    John,

    I also have a 50mm f4 flektogon P6 mount lens on a tilt adapter that I used with both canon and sony SLRs. I am interested in landscape use and in avoiding focus blending. The tilt adapter works but it is much easier to use with live view than without. I got the canon because I was also interested in flat, sometimes called orthographic, stitching where you mount the lens on the tripod and slide the camera while the lens remains steady. That removes the possibility of parallax and is an inherently more accurate technique.

    In the end I think I'm just going to do rotational stitching with focus blending since my probable next camera, the Sigma SD1, is unlikely to have live view.

    I'm not sure how well the canon would work for architecture but it certainly looks good on the Nex-5 with full shift in both directions. I'm pretty sure it would also make an excellent architectural lens on the sony but the lens will have to be modified because the register is too short for Sony SLR use as is.

    There is an extensive documentation of conversion of the lens in the "photography on the net" forums.

    Mike

    Quote Originally Posted by John Inglis View Post
    How did you decide on the shift lens that you bought and what do you want to use if for? I ask on account of those who say that post processing is good enough. I ask because shift lenses look so beautiful in terms of there mechanics and would love to buy one for architecture, but have not yet taken the plunge! And I have this fl fd canon adapter sitting around wanting to be useful.

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    Re: how to calculate fov with shift lens

    Mike,
    Thank you for pointing me in many directions!
    I would appreciate it if you could report back on what it is like using the shift lens on the Sony Nex! How easy is it to use and whether you are pleased with the results.
    John

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    Re: how to calculate fov with shift lens

    John,

    It's very easy to use. I used it only once to compare it to the 16mm for fov. The 16mm is 24mm equivalent. The 35 with full shift is about 26-28mm equivalent. The far shift is somewhat underexposed but nothing that couldn't be fixed; the image was pretty much equally sharp across the stitched image. You could use varying number of exposures to make the blending smoother. I didn't use the tilt but I'm sure it would work fine.

    I'm away from home where the lens and adapter are and won't be back until mid December.

    Mike

    Quote Originally Posted by John Inglis View Post
    Mike,
    Thank you for pointing me in many directions!
    I would appreciate it if you could report back on what it is like using the shift lens on the Sony Nex! How easy is it to use and whether you are pleased with the results.
    John

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