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Thread: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

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    Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I have been side-pursuing boke panoramas for some time now, starting a few years ago with a funky portrait and a macro rose shot, and continuing from this spring, and I really like the results. I am still fairly inexperienced with it, I would say, although at this point I do have a decent but small collection of shots.

    My quest is to find the lens/aperture/subject distance combination which gives the most interesting, large-format-like results. I currently use either Zeiss 100 MP or Nikkor 200/2 VR on my Nikon D3, and stitch in Autopano Pro or Photoshop CS4.

    I am curious to hear about other people's experiences with this, what equipment they use, see their results, and generally chat about it.

    Here is my first recent shot, which I called "Veil of Sharpness", due to the very thin and transparent region in focus. Nikon D3, 200/2 VR @ f/2.



    P.S. my apologies to those who prefer spelling boke with 'h': my reason is that the 'h' isn't standard practice for translating Japanese into English, and was only done because most people otherwise mis-pronounce it to rhyme with "bloke" instead of bo-keh. See also Mike Johnston's original essay on this topic on LL.)

    P.P.S. some guy out there by the name of Brenizer also started doing boke panoramas at some point a couple of years ago, and a bunch of people on Flickr who had never seen it before started calling it the "Brenizer Method". He originally said that he didn't invent it, which is true, but now he has changed his line and says that he has asked "thousands of people" if they had ever seen something like that before, and they answered no, so therefore he invented it. Someone ought to ask him if *he* has seen it before, to which the answer is yes, according to himself a couple of years ago.

    P.P.P.S. I certainly didn't invent it either. My first was around 2007, although I had been thinking about it for some time before doing it, and Daniel Buck got there before me, and he had also seen it somewhere else before. Anyway, all it is is stitching with a large aperture, so no one invented it explicitly, except perhaps the first guy to stitch. We are talking old film days.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    FYI, here are my two early results, created in 2007 with the Leica M8 and 50 Lux ASPH, and 90/4 Macro, respectively, from 36 and 100 shots, respectively. I concluded at the time that macro boke panoramas made no sense; I got nearly the same results with a single 75 Lux shot.



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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This one was less successful, but I know what I am after here, and there is something there somewhere. This was recent shot #2.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Here are two, still early spring with ice on the water, which I quite like, although neither is stunningly beautiful. One or both may be over-sharpened. I need to redo these, as I was less good with sharpening at that time.



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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This one is back on track, IMO, but I need to find a better tree for what I want. Over-sharpened again. I will come back and redo it at some point, hopefully soon.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This was another attempt at the veil of sharpness look, but it didn't work. I like the shot, but it is somehow unspectacular.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This one I like very much. It is over-sharpened, no question, but this put it into an intriguing painting-like look which I would like to pursue, parallel to my general boke panorama project. All other shots so far were with the 200/2 VR, but this one is the Zeiss 100 MP, I believe.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Here is another one I quite like, although I haven't received much positive feedback on it. I am slowly getting my sharpening under control, but I am not there yet.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This one I also like, but I need to revisit it. It has more potential than I was able to pull out of this shot, I think. 100 MP again, as was the previous shot. Still over-sharpened.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This one achieves the look I want. Interestingly, it is a single Zeiss ZF.2 50 MP shot, and thus should be kicked out of this thread.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Carsten:

    interesting pursuit, though i admit to being confused by the "large format" look in conjunction with boke and panorama and small format camera?

    what I see, rather than an emphasis on boke, is a defined range of what is in focus, more a defined and controlled depth of field ("thin veil of focus"). I'm not sure how that relates to large format and pano.

    I like the effect in shot #4; looks very much like what you see in the ground glass

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I am only relating to the thin depth of field which naturally comes with the larger formats. To get that thin a depth of field with 35mm FF at an appreciable distance (not just macro or portraits), you need to resort to tricks. Stitching is the trick here, with shots made wide open, on big-aperture tele lenses.

    Of course, many people shooting large format don't shoot wide open at all. Most even. So the tagline is a bit of a lie
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Very interesting topic and some nice shots Carsten. I have to agree though that you went a little overboard on sharpening with some of those. Not an easy task though, and I mentioned elsewhere that I'm still struggling with downsizing and sharpening of very large images myself.

    I got myself a pano head this spring and I think I haven't taken a single "serious" single-frame image since then (not that I get out to photograph my preferred subjects very often anyway). Very nice way to work around not being able to afford a FF, let alone MF camera.

    My only lens that is somewhat capable of shallow DOF panos is the Contax 35-70/3.4. Here's one at 70/4 (with the Fuji S5 as always):



    So where's the "shallow DOF"? That is a problem with web presentation, a lot of the effect is lost when downsizing the image because the background gets too sharp. Here's a 50% crop from above image:



    At medium distances, the Vario-Sonnar delivers very smooth yet Zeiss-like boke, and I like the results very much when conditions are right. Something that doesn't work as well ist short subject distances with the lens wide open such as in this example:



    Very nice sharpness and contrast in the foreground, but the mid-range background (ivy on the tree) does look somewhat disturbing. Also, there are background highlight circles that are "cut" due to the stitching process.

    So far I have only been using Hugin for my stitching, it's free and has worked well most of the time so far.

    There are many things to consider if one wants to get the maximum from this technique and I'm still in the early stages of learning, but so far it has absolutely been worth the trouble for me. I'm looking forward to exchanging experience on the technique.
    Last edited by dcjs; 20th May 2011 at 14:57.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Very nice results, David. That Fuji really has electric greens. Do you boost them?

    I will go back and redo my panos w.r.t. sharpening, and update the results inline, to keep from bombarding the thread with the same results again.

    I have been putting it off since for some of them I didn't store the full-size intermediate result in Aperture, and so I need to redo the panoramas themselves. Another reason is that all my work is done on a 15" 2.4GHz MacBook Pro with 6GB RAM, which can be a bit slow. My workflow was a bit loose when I started this. Meanwhile, it has settled down and I am fairly efficient.

    My sharpening technique is based on the ones of Samuli Vahonen and Luka (denoir) over on FM. Basically, I use three levels of strength: Sharpen, USM 150/0.5/5, and Smart Sharpen 100/0.2. I always sharpen, reduce size by 62% (random number not evenly dividing pixel count), and repeat. At the end I add a frame, which I find helps the presentation immensely.

    I start with Sharpen and see if it was not enough, looks good, or if it was too strong. If it was not enough, I try it again. If at any point it looks good, I go to the next size down. If it was too strong, I undo it, and try USM. The same procedure holds here, and if that was too strong, I undo it and use Smart Sharpen, which is so mild that I usually have to apply it two or three times.

    The problem with my earlier results was not the procedure, but my evaluation. I am more trained in spotting trouble now, and tend to leave the images very slightly soft at all steps, until the very last one.

    This technique works so much better than anything I have tried before, although I have not tried Nik Sharpener, and so on. Maybe I should, because I suppose it could save time, and I might then be able to stay in Aperture. I could code a frame plugin for Aperture myself, it shouldn't be too hard, since I am a programmer.

    Out of curiousity, what aspects of the process are you still tinkering with?
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Carsten,

    I don't do any kind of selective color correction to my images. In fact, my PP skills are quite rudimentary (also caused by being stuck with an ancient version of PS), but luckily the Fuji usually does not require any sort of serious PP at all. In fact, changing settings during RAW conversion usually makes the images look worse, I mostly only tinker with saturation, contrast and exposure/dynamic range. White balance is usually set to 5300K and works for all but extreme conditions.

    Almost all of my panos so far are JPGs straight out of the camera, mostly with color saturation set to medium high in-camera. Those greens are enhanced by the polarizer, but I think they don't look "fake" because of the natural color rendition of the camera.

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    Shelby Lewis
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This is a technique I've delved into a little bit... and really like the results. I've actually thought about doing it, with fewer frames, on my MF equipment to see it I can get a more LF-like presentation.

    Neat examples!

    Here's one I posted a long while back... my atypical color treatment didn't work that well though and I might revisit this one. Or maybe not.



    I'll have to get back into this stuff!

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    David, that is pretty amazing (about the natural Fuji green) colours, but I guess there is a reason that Fuji film boxes are green

    Shelby, that is a really neat shot! Do you have more? The grain looks great, but it is somewhat ironic how you are simulating large grain in a photo with huge resolution
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Shelby, that is a really neat shot! Do you have more? The grain looks great, but it is somewhat ironic how you are simulating large grain in a photo with huge resolution
    My computer crashed last week, so I don't have anything readily available for another few days.

    Your comment about the grain solves a problem I've had with this image. I never could explain what was funky about it... I like the grain but it always seemed out of place. I think you put your finger on it. We're accustomed to associating ultra-high resolution with small grain... at least anecdotally. It all makes sense now, ha.

    BTW... my posted photo was taken with a 5Dii and an 85/1.8 at around f2 (maybe 30 or so frames). I think these photos often (but not always) work best with fast mid-telephoto length lenses. Lenses that are quite long often lose the veil of sharpness due to subject-to-distance concerns or take too many shots to (sometimes) be practical. The fast mid-telephotos can allow a bit of breathing room (fewer shots) while still allowing for shallow DoF. I bet the sony 135/1.8 would be perfect for this application... much like the 85/1.2 on the canon end.

    Cool stuff!

    I bet the Mamiya 150/2.8 would be great in this regard as well... super sharp but not too long. I might try one of these with my mamiya 210/4, wide open, at moderately close distance in order to see how this works with MF. Or maybe the 80/2.8 at close distance.

    You've sparked my interest in this again!

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    This is right on the border of what a boke panorama is, being just two shots, but the look is right. Cross-posted from the Zeiss thread. 50P ZF.2:

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I gave this a shot with my aptus ii-6, and mamiya 210/4 (wide open). Worked pretty well considering an f4 lens.

    To save (lots!) processing time during this trial, I output 2000px (long side) jpegs out of lightroom and then combined those. I bet if I output full size files and then merged them, the effect would be more pronounced. I might let the computer give it a shot later on tonight.

    As it stands... not too bad (composition and funky light not withstanding ).



    Cheers!
    Shelby

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    That's a neat shot! Is there a story about how the tree got lost and ended up in the lake?

    I don't think that resizing the images first changes the look, unless you print very large.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I think I have caught up with the over-sharpening now. Let me know if anyone sees a problem still.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Here is one I did back in 2007 with my Leica M8 and the über-fantastic 50 Lux ASPH. I love the look, but the white sky and the white plastic boxes stop me from loving the shot as much I had hoped. Try, try again.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Here is a new one, D3, 50MP. I was struggling a bit with brightness/contrast and white balance. I should have spent more time nailing the exposure.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Cross-posted from the Leica 180/2 vs Nikkor 200/2 VR thread. 13 shots with the Leica 180/2 stitched. I would have wished for a little more space around the tree, but there was too much junk around. The shots are very sharp, with generally very attractive boke, but in the background trees there are some donuts in the highlights, i.e. slightly over-corrected spherical aberration.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I have seen bouquet used, instead of boke h . This suggests that the origin is French as in Cartier-Bresson, but Daguerre also springs to mind. The pronunciation might then end up as bucket, hence bokeh was used by those who wished to render it into writing, in American as the English/Irish are familiar with bouquet.

    I defer to the photographer as artist always, but using low light lenses for this task is making it trickier, surely? On the other hand, why not use an 85mm 1.2? Just asking.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Shooting with an LF lens wide open usually means noticeable fall-off towards the corners. Try adding that in PP for more of a LF look. Here is a LF example (Cooke XVa on 8x10" E100G, 645 mm wide open at f/16):
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Pat, boke was brought to the English by Mike Johnston of theonlinephotographer fame, along with one of his friends. Unadorned it means simply fuzzy, for example the mind of a senior getting on in his/her years. boke aji means the quality of the unsharpness, and is used by photographers in Japan. They were much earlier to the appreciation of the out-of-focus areas than we were.

    Do you mean why not use the 85/1.2 for stitching, or just straight? Most of my stitches have a much wider angle of view than an 85mm lens. Also, I am a Nikon user

    Lars, beautiful shot, and you probably have a good point. I will try it on my next stitch. Awesome lens you are using, btw. One day I want to try 8x10 with this lens.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Cross-posted from the panorama thread:

    4-shot pano with the 100MP:

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    4-shot stitch, 100MP:

    Last edited by carstenw; 15th August 2011 at 05:05.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Interesting sequence to follow. My thoughts:

    With a 100mm lens, if you want really shallow DOF the subject needs to be nearby, so that doesnt work so well with landscape subjects like forests. I would try a 300/4 (since I have one) and see if I can make a 4x4 stitch (I suspect that's a lot of work). That would yield a perspective of a 75mm lens, with a nice shallow DOF - just like a 300 on 4x5.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Hi Lars,

    I like to play with the narrow depth of field, but I am not searching for the absolute minimum. I am more looking to find this easy, relaxed look of LF, where you can have visible DoF even at larger distances, with a gently rendered background, and a tack-sharp foreground. The 100/2 at a distance of 10-15m, or my 180/2 at a distance of 25m both give this. I think this last shot should maybe have been stopped down a little, perhaps f/2.8 or f/4.

    4x4 is a lot of work, unless you have CS4/5 and a fast computer with loads of RAM. My (brand-new) Mac mini with 8GB handles 4 shots easily, perhaps 8 shots still elegantly, but 16 would surely tax it quite heavily. Once the OWC or Crucial 16GB upgrade for the new Mac mini is ready, I will probably spring for it.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Carsten,

    Good to know - I haven't done much stitching beyond the 6x17 I make from two 6x9 shots with rear shift on my Ebony LF camera, and stitched scans of 6x17.

    On a purely subjective note, I like the the water shot above, the DOF gives it a lot of threedimensional depth, more than the tree in the field. I also like the composition and simplicity, and the way it leads the observer's eye to first take in the overall image and then explore the details. But seeing these in such a small format is of course quite different than even looking at a fullscreen image, not to mention a good-sized print.

    Anyways, thanks again for sharing.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I just went back and re-read the previous page, and I had completely forgotten about trying out some vignetting. I went back and added it to that last shot. I was trying not to overdo it, but may have done too little instead. I may also have to brighten the shot a bit, although the photo was taken just minutes before it started raining fairly heavily.

    Thanks for the comments about the two islands shot! I have started using 1200px on the long dimension now, and find it much better than 1024px, but still not nearly as nice as 1400-1500px on the long side. I recently started printing again, and will try to print a couple of these shots at A3 or A3+ and see how they look.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    3-shot 100MP stitch @f/2.8. Cross-posted to panorama and Zeiss threads.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    8-shot stitch with the [email protected]/2.8. My best shot of today, and I am quite happy with it, but it isn't perfect (missing trunk at the bottom, perhaps composition improvement), so I will go back and improve it.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I did this a long time ago as a test one morning. Its 32 images stitched together shot with an 85mm lens at f2.8. Had to go to f2.8 to keep enough DoF for the Compass.


    Adler Planetarium Panoromic Bokeh by PeteTsai, on Flickr

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Neat shot, although the foreground somehow feels a bit over-sharpened. I was in Chicago in 2001 and recognize the building formerly known as the Sears Tower, although I can't really see where the photo was taken from, based on my memory of what islands were around. I guess my knowledge of the layout of the area is lacking.

    Here is a re-taken version of the shots above, this time with 25 shots, [email protected]/3.3:

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Carsten that looks fantastic, I really like it. That's the difference between good and sloppy composition hehe. So three-dimensional, tons of depth. Also seems to have slightly warmer light?

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Neat shot, although the foreground somehow feels a bit over-sharpened. I was in Chicago in 2001 and recognize the building formerly known as the Sears Tower, although I can't really see where the photo was taken from, based on my memory of what islands were around. I guess my knowledge of the layout of the area is lacking.

    Here is a re-taken version of the shots above, this time with 25 shots, [email protected]/3.3:

    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Thanks, I appreciate that a lot, coming from you. The Zeiss 100 Makro-Planar really is a great lens when stopped down a little. Yes, yesterday's was close, but not there. Today's I am happy with. The funny thing is that I had less time today, with my daughter in her kinderwagen sitting behind me telling me she didn't want to stop there On the other hand, I had a much better idea what I wanted, having seen that I left too little room around the edge and had too little depth of field in yesterday's. I will print this one, and maybe buy a nice frame. It is possible that the light was a little warmer today, but it is also possible that I just white balanced it slightly differently. I actually did very little to the processing, the lens did most of it, and the stitching the rest.
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Carsten,
    I just wondered if the effect of a very fast wide angle wide open should be the same as a stitched from a longer lens? What do you think?
    Tom

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by t_streng View Post
    Carsten,
    I just wondered if the effect of a very fast wide angle wide open should be the same as a stitched from a longer lens? What do you think?
    Tom
    If I recall correctly - I hope I got this right:

    For a given angle of view it's the actual physical diameter of the aperture that determines the amount of defocus. This would mean that a stitched image of 2x2 frames from a 50 mm lens at f/4 (12.5 mm aperture) would appear similar to a single frame from a 25mm lens at f/2 (also 12.5 mm aperture) (same size frame, for example full-frame 24x36 mm).

    So let's say that Carsten's tree image corresponds to a 4x4 frame stitch (96x144 mm) when we take overlaps into account - essentially a 4x6" format image. He used a 100 mm lens, so that would correspond to a field of view of a 100/4 = 25 mm lens. The corresponding aperture for a 25 mm lens would then be 3.3/4 = 0.825. That would be a sweet lens indeed.

    Carsten has pinpointed with the tree image what sets larger formats apart from smaller: Extremely shallow depth of field, even for wide angle lenses. As a comparison, I have for large format a f/5.6 100 mm Apo-Symmar lens that just covers 4x5", perhaps wide open it would yield results comparable to Carsten's image but there would be a lot of corner fall-off. Stepping up to 8x10, I have a f/5.6 210 mm Fujinon. Shooting that one wide open would yield slightly shallower DOF, whereas f/6.6 should make DOF appear about the same as in Carsten's image (if it was a 200 mm lens). All approximations, of course.
    Monochrome: http://mochro.com

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Ach, I forgot the vignetting again! Damn, I have to remember this. I will try adding it and see how it looks.

    Tom, as Lars points out, some of the characteristics are similar between large format wide angles and small format stitched photos, but not all. The look of the lens remains per lens. I would love to use 8x10" digital with the Cooke that I think Lars has, but this is a pipe dream.

    How is your S2 photography going?
    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    Ach, I forgot the vignetting again! Damn, I have to remember this. I will try adding it and see how it looks.

    Tom, as Lars points out, some of the characteristics are similar between large format wide angles and small format stitched photos, but not all. The look of the lens remains per lens. I would love to use 8x10" digital with the Cooke that I think Lars has, but this is a pipe dream.

    How is your S2 photography going?
    Hi Carsten,
    S2 does fine but time is limited.
    Sometimes I still think that I also want something different for some occasions, either tech camera or maybe LF.

    ...Iasked about the fast WA with one image in my mind and just found it again (24/1.4 on M9)...but just, obviously the DOF is shallow but not as shallow and smooth as the one in the stitches you posted.

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by carstenw View Post
    I would love to use 8x10" digital with the Cooke that I think Lars has, but this is a pipe dream.
    Well... The Cooke XVa is a really nice lens for 8x10 (partly because of its convertible feature) but if you compare resolving power to a stitch of 25 frames from your Zeiss it probably wouldnt measure up - it comes down to MTF of lp/mm. 40 lp/mm is quite sufficient on 8x10 whereas on a 24x36 sensor it would be a bit soft even on a 12 Mpx sensor.

    Next question, of course would be where we would find an 8x10" sensor. Now THAT's a pipe dream .

    EDIT: Well, what do you know, somebody created a 10 megapixel 8x10 back - yours (or his) for $500K:
    http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2011/08/...-capture-back/
    Last edited by Lars; 31st August 2011 at 05:51.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Tom,
    I think you'll find that the tree in Carsten's image really just is a little bush - look at the grass straws near the trunk. So the focusing distance in your image is much larger, thus the almost sharp background.
    Quote Originally Posted by t_streng View Post
    ...Iasked about the fast WA with one image in my mind and just found it again (24/1.4 on M9)...but just, obviously the DOF is shallow but not as shallow and smooth as the one in the stitches you posted.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    I've had a look into this kind of thing, attempting the LF look from stitching frames with shallow DOF. First thing I learnt was that you need a lot, a heck of a lot of frames for it to work, Yes you can cover 4X5 with 16 FF DSLR frames but when you need to shoot overlap it's nearer 30. That's before you HDR or bracket. You end up with the same issues you face with LF, it becomes slow, very very slow. From the shooting to the processing. Nevermind the changing light during the shots, etc. I'll be honest that if I was trying for that look, the tonality/shallow DOF/long lens used close up, etc of a 4X5+ format I'd be very tempted to say screw it, just shoot film in the first place. If you are going for pure resolution then of course you can do it in a fraction of the frames with a good DSLR but if you want the tonality it's somewhat different.

    Oh for the return of T55!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Last edited by Ben Rubinstein; 31st August 2011 at 08:40. Reason: I'm an idiot
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    Oh I would say it's even slower - and it's not single-shot so it's even less useful for subjects that are not stationary.

    Interesting to try if you don't have an LF rig though - and I think experimenting should be encouraged for those willing to make the effort.
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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    The 8x10" digital sensor is interesting, but costs 6 figures and is only 12MP. The guy who commissioned it only uses it as a digital Polaroid, doing the final shot with film. As such, I doubt the back has very good quality, just sufficient.

    I find it takes me about the same amount of time to set up my 4x5 (Linhof MT) or to set up my D3 and do a panorama, carefully. The development is of course faster with the digital photos, since if you do it carefully, you just throw them into Autopano Pro and let it do its thing.

    Tom, if instead of taking that shot from where you were standing, you used the same lens, but went twice as close, made two vertical shots and stitched them, you would have much less depth of field. By going twice as close with the 24, you would also change the perspective, since the relative distances to the various parts of the tree would change.

    My shots were taken from about 2-3m, and I took 25 shots with a 100mm at f/3.3. This is quite extreme, but you can't get that look without similar numbers.

    Here is another one I made yesterday, [email protected]/3.3, 41 shots:

    Carsten - Website

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    Re: Boke Panoramas - large format with small cameras

    One last one for today. 100MP, f/2.4, 21 shots:

    Carsten - Website

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