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Thread: YES!

  1. #101
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    Re: YES!

    Will be great to see a CMOS sensor handle luminance like a CCD sensor chaps - but I wouldn't hold my breath.

    The new M is about more megapixels and better this that and the other thing - as well as native use of M glass. It won't compete with CCD sensor tech as far as luminance pop goes. It will kill CCD in many other important areas.

    Have fun with it you lucky early 'getters'.

  2. #102
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    Re: YES!

    Jono-Maybe you can help on this particular question. Why after 3200ISO, does it say 4000pushed,5000pushed and 6400pushed? Does that really mean in order to noise to a very manageable point one must max out at 3200ISO? To me with M9 orMM the word pushed means you are asking for noise trouble. Same with the M?

    I regularly use 5000 ISO with the 5D3 and I see very little noise. The RX-1 I have set it to ISO6400 max for now, but of course higher ISO is easily possible and 6400ISO renders very little noise IMHO.

  3. #103
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    Re: YES!

    Quote Originally Posted by algrove View Post
    Jono-Maybe you can help on this particular question. Why after 3200ISO, does it say 4000pushed,5000pushed and 6400pushed? Does that really mean in order to noise to a very manageable point one must max out at 3200ISO?

    I regularly use 5000 ISO with the 5D3 and I see very little noise. The RX-1 I have set it to ISO6400 max for now, but of course higher ISO is easily possible and 6400ISO renders very little noise IMHO.
    Hi There
    The reason it says PUSH is because it's possible to get banding at those ISO levels, and Leica (quite honestly) didn't want people to get the wrong idea.

    On the other hand, I've shot a lot at those ISO values, and as long as you don't underexpose it's great - I thought they were being too cautious, but I can see the point (even if I disagree with it!).

    Shoot PUSH with care and confidence I'd say.

    Just this guy you know
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  4. #104
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    Re: YES!

    Thanks for the input, Jono.

    I was using an R lens on a Novoflex R to M adapter (better than having no adapter for sure) tonight. I finally figured out when using LV how to get the FA to start up (by changing the focus-OK makes sense), but I did notice I had some weird thin black strip along the top most of the thumbnails after down loading them into my computer from the SD card. I did not really hit Play as things were happening too fast. I just looked at the histogram from time to time to see how far to the right I could expose in order to gain more highlight detail. (By the way love the histogram as it is now like the MM-completely across the LCD) BUT, when I bring these images into PS to look at them (that's my double-click default software-Mac), the black strips are gone. Any explanation?

    I was using the 105-280 at many zoom levels and f stops from 4.2 up to 5.6 to maybe f8 maximum and all images had the thin black strips at the top of the horizontal image. I had it set on single shot. Was I taking the shots too fast for full capture perhaps? I missed the fireball of the sun and wanted to get the bright orange sky before it turned into purple/blue. I was on LV with FA, auto WB, ISO 200 and noticed many shots were at 1/250, but I can check exactly if important.

    PS--A very strange addition to this point. I was also using an S at a Leica store opening and ALSO got the thin black strips on those thumbnail images as well, but the flash card was different and a CF card. Same thing, when I bring them into PS no black strip just like with the M. The Leica Store had never heard of this happening. Am I doing something wrong?

    It must be the Red Bull!

  5. #105
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    Re: YES!

    Quote Originally Posted by algrove View Post
    Thanks for the input, Jono.

    I was using an R lens on a Novoflex R to M adapter (better than having no adapter for sure) tonight. I finally figured out when using LV how to get the FA to start up (by changing the focus-OK makes sense), but I did notice I had some weird thin black strip along the top most of the thumbnails after down loading them into my computer from the SD card. I did not really hit Play as things were happening too fast. I just looked at the histogram from time to time to see how far to the right I could expose in order to gain more highlight detail. (By the way love the histogram as it is now like the MM-completely across the LCD) BUT, when I bring these images into PS to look at them (that's my double-click default software-Mac), the black strips are gone. Any explanation?

    I was using the 105-280 at many zoom levels and f stops from 4.2 up to 5.6 to maybe f8 maximum and all images had the thin black strips at the top of the horizontal image. I had it set on single shot. Was I taking the shots too fast for full capture perhaps? I missed the fireball of the sun and wanted to get the bright orange sky before it turned into purple/blue. I was on LV with FA, auto WB, ISO 200 and noticed many shots were at 1/250, but I can check exactly if important.

    PS--A very strange addition to this point. I was also using an S at a Leica store opening and ALSO got the thin black strips on those thumbnail images as well, but the flash card was different and a CF card. Same thing, when I bring them into PS no black strip just like with the M. The Leica Store had never heard of this happening. Am I doing something wrong?

    It must be the Red Bull!
    Ho Hum - It's not showing you the overexposed area is it? (under clipping definition in the menu).

    I've just tried it and I can't do it . . . .the top of the LCD shows the shutter and iSO right - these are underlined with a thin white line, leaving a slightly fatter black line below the thin white line - that's not what your seeing?

    Why not take a snap with an iPhone and post it up here if you can make it do it again.

    All the best

    Jono

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  6. #106
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    Re: YES!

    I think it is sorted since that's only upon import as the computer builds the thumbnails.

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    Re: YES!

    Quote Originally Posted by algrove View Post
    Jono-Maybe you can help on this particular question. Why after 3200ISO, does it say 4000pushed,5000pushed and 6400pushed?
    jono gave you a peculiar and incomplete answer.

    Look at the specs for Nikon and Canon released in recent years, they report separately "ISOs" and "ISOs pushed".

    This has a rather specific meaning.

    A standard ISO refer to in-sensor adjustable amplification or gain. Push refers to amplification or gain in post processing, after going beyond the maximum the sensor can perform.

    for example, 6400 (as a 'pushed' ISO) takes images at 3200 ISO from the standpoint of the sensor. Indeed, it produces the exact same raw file as a 3200 ISO image capture.

    all the 6400 ISO setting does it instruct the internal exposure meter (if you even use it) to underexpose by 1 stop, direct the in-camera histogram and back panel rendering to overexpose by 1 stop, and add to the EXIF file an instruction to boost exposure by 1 stop in post-processing (for software that does so automatically when instructed).

    What that means, in practice is that the actual maximum ISO of the M240 hardware is 3200, and the Leica did not disclose this fully in earlier released specifications. by the standards of contemporary digital camera specifications, this was a whopper of an omission by Leica.

    In photoshop, you could just as well leave the camera on ISO 3200 underexpose and push the M240's raw file to 4000, 5000, 6400 or -- why stop there -- to 12800, it's no more or less valid a procedure. It's the same procedure.

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