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Thread: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

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    Super Duper
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    OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Hi,

    Was looking through the threads on the Lighting Forum, mostly equipment and little of the real McCoy.

    So I'm going to suggest that we show photos, portrait/fashion/product/etc lit at least in part artificially (from a reflector outdoors to full blown studio setup) with a diagram or clear explanation of the lighting used and more importantly - why and for what specific purpose that lighting was used in this specific situation. What did it add to the final image that a different lighting setup wouldn't have?

    It's exactly midnight here so I'm I'll try and get my own example up tomorrow but I think that this would be really educational. Cummon folks...
    I am not a painter, nor an artist. Therefore I can see straight, and that may be my undoing. - Alfred Stieglitz

    Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    OK, some of you people are going to come up with some incredible stuff but I'm pretty much a lighting infant, I have certain setups I use at weddings but nothing exciting.

    Here is a photo from an ultra traditional Chassidic wedding. The couple will not touch during the photos so it forms a challenge to think up 'connecting' poses! I had exactly 10 minutes to shoot this couple with the mother in law ("I don't believe in photos!") standing over me like a hawk! I did 22 seperate poses of them in ten minutes and I still don't know how! One of my 5D's is actually in the repair shop at present from being rained on so heavily during the outdoors ceremony from that job though it did a futher wedding, barmitzva and 250 college headshots before the rear LCD packed it it!

    Anyway enough blabber. Keep in mind that wedding work is fast paced and you need 'one size fits all' solutions. You also don't have the time to set up or organise mutiple lights so lights have to do more than one job that in a studio you would use seperate lights for.

    Here is a diagram of the lighting. The lighting was: Main/Fill - 50" shoot thru white brollies (bounced into), Kicker - Lastolite 45" Umbrella box.


    Now for the why. I always try to shoot brides with short lighting. Never met a bride yet who wanted to look fatter. Hence her position on the (camera) right. On the other hand I can't use too high a ratio or position the lights too close as I need the groom well lit as well. I don't mind the fact that as he is next to her he's getting the broad lighting.

    I'm using the Kicker light to do 3 things. Firstly lit at that angle it gives an almost imperceptible rim light which is just enough to give a bit of seperation between the white of the bride and the cream background. You can't see it unless you compare the before/after and see her 'jump' out of an otherwise much flatter photo. Secondly it's providing a bit of backlighting through the veil and thirdly it's set to skim across the folds of the curtain to provide definition to the shape of the folds, again to provide more seperation. I know that a kicker is usually set at a lower setting than the other lights but personally I like it to be the same as the fill for effect.

    I use shoot thru brollies, always bounced into for a nice incredibly soft wrap around effect and to be honest the extra light bouncing off the walls gives a lot of soft wrap, like making the whole room into a huge softbox but you still get modelling. You need a light that doesn't need changing as you work through many photos when you have so little time! There literally is no time for moving lights, test shots, etc. Hence the very soft overall light with only a small ratio for the modelling. The Kicker uses a lastolite umbrella box which is a great portable round softbox for when I want more direction to my light. Got two of them in my bag.

    Anyway, the photo:


    Sounds complicated in writing but takes about 10 minutes for my assistant to set up and I'm ready to shoot!
    I am not a painter, nor an artist. Therefore I can see straight, and that may be my undoing. - Alfred Stieglitz

    Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Okay Ben, I'm game.

    Rather than product stuff (which I've posted plenty of in the past), here are some different people shots using strobes. I'll try my best to remember how I set up the lights ... I tend to light by looking as opposed to measuring ... I can't remember the last time I used a light meter. So I set it up and then move stuff while looking at the effect it has. After awhile you get pretty fast at it and do the calculations intuitively.

    Angry man: One light; One softbox camera right, slight rear, up a bit higher than his head; bounce camera left forward of subject and pulled away until it just barely filled the ink black shadows.

    Confirmation Image: 2 lights; Large 7' softbox just out of FOV, camera left, Large collapsable white flat with strobe bounced off of it dialed to just under 1 to 2 ratio to keep it all pristine white high key.

    Hair Model: One light; location shoot of hair models, 60" shoot through translucent umbrella, camera right up slightly higher and feathered down, bounce using silver enhanced white reflector just out of camera FOV camera left but lower to fill a little under chin. (eye shadow enhanced in PS during post.)

    Role Playing Portrait (ala Cindy Sherman); in studio using 3 lights, one key light 7' softbox at model height camera left, large 8' flat camera right with strobe fired into it and dialed to an almost 1 to 1 ratio, overhead light in softbox on white background to provide hard edge on subject .... background is a close-up of the dress fabric that was added using PS during post. (BTW Ben, this is something I'm going to start doing for wedding clients: shoot a close up of their dress detail and use it for a background in a Bridal portrait.)
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    I am pretty new to lightening. I have to say I am very impressed with Marc W's images. Here is one from some experimenting I tried. If i remember correctly, I had a slightly to side light and just above the flowers with a barn door and grid, and a second very low monolight from above. Gray mulsin.

  5. #5
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Ben, this guys wins it for the most ultimate cool hair doo I have ever seen in my life!!!


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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Ebay Tripod shot
    Attachment 12624
    ok, dull, ok I admit it
    -bob

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by mark1958 View Post
    I am pretty new to lightening. I have to say I am very impressed with Marc W's images. Here is one from some experimenting I tried. If i remember correctly, I had a slightly to side light and just above the flowers with a barn door and grid, and a second very low monolight from above. Gray mulsin.
    There are several types of well-lit shots in this thread, but this is the one (mark1958's pitcher of flowers) that interests me most. It's quite a beautiful image regardless of how it was made, but still: Can you provide any further detail on how you lit it? Such as...

    -- Any modifiers on the main light other than the barn door and grid? e.g., anything to diffuse or soften it?

    -- Any modifiers on the second light?

    -- About what distance were the two lights from the subject?

    -- When you say "second very low monolight", am I correct in assuming you mean "very low" in terms of power setting, rather than position?

    I'm interpreting all this to mean that you had a lower-powered, larger/softer source (the plain monolight) plus a higher-powered, harder source (the one with the grid and barn door) coming from basically the same direction... which is an interesting concept.

    I've always wanted to come up with a setup that would imitate the effect of sunlight coming in through a very dirty window, and this seems like an approach that might do that.

    Thanks for any further info...

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    I love the tripod shot.. That is too artistic for ebay sale...


    In regards to my tulip shot, I spent half a day trying different shots and I cannot remember with definitive certainty the angle of the lights but I will recall best to ability.I know i had shut all the extraneous light from other rooms and from the window.

    I had a hensel 500 monolight off to the side with a barn door and grid. I had played around with the barn doors to get the light to shin like it did. I was pretty close to the flowers, no more than a few feet away. The light was just about the height of the flowers or a bit higher. There was a bit of a stronger reflection on the silver vase that I softened a bit in PS. The second light had a softbox and was above possibly just off to the side, and you are correct what i mean was that I had a minimal setting. I do not believe in this shot I had anything else. I had a diffuser but I do not believe i used it in this shot. I was playing around so much and changing a lot of parameters some ever so slightly and then looked through the images. I probably should have written things down.

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    Workshop Member ChrisDauer's Avatar
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    Okay Ben, I'm game.
    Angry man: One light; One softbox camera right, slight rear, up a bit higher than his head; bounce camera left forward of subject and pulled away until it just barely filled the ink black shadows.

    Role Playing Portrait (ala Cindy Sherman); in studio using 3 lights, one key light 7' softbox at model height camera left, large 8' flat camera right with strobe fired into it and dialed to an almost 1 to 1 ratio, overhead light in softbox on white background to provide hard edge on subject .... background is a close-up of the dress fabric that was added using PS during post. (BTW Ben, this is something I'm going to start doing for wedding clients: shoot a close up of their dress detail and use it for a background in a Bridal portrait.)
    Angry man is awesome. And the halo is a nice touch.

  10. #10
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!



    Very basic large softbox camera left and raised just above the subject.
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Very basic large softbox camera left and raised just above the subject.[/QUOTE]


    Very nice...box size distance power?

    Thanks,

    Bob

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Nice shot, Michael. When I saw this, I had just seen a similar look on the faces of several UConn fans after the NCAA semi this evening against Michigan State. (Not to worry, I cheer for all the teams....being a sports shooter creates new meaning for the need of "neutrality".) I like the fall-off and you got just enough wrapped spill on the subjects left side of the face to keep the dimensionality there. Looks good.

    LJ

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by docmoore View Post


    Very nice...box size distance power?

    Thanks,

    Bob
    Thank you, I bought the box long enough ago I honestly don't know the exact measurement, looks about 2.5 by 3 feet. The distance is 10-14 inches, just out of frame, the flash was down 1/32.

    LJ,

    Thank you for the feedback! It's hard shooting sports and being impartial. I haven't shot sports in a few years, but I definitely found myself picking a favorite by the end of a game.

    The expression here was just part of a test I was doing with this actor, helping him to become more familiar with his expressions, and how they come across in preparation of a project we would be working on together. The project had some more complex lighting situations, perhaps I'll post some of those up later

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    Member Y Sol's Avatar
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Here is a shot from a bar in a hotel on a German island.
    I used two 1000W Arri spots outside and some 150W Dedolights inside.
    I love to shot with the Dedolights and sometimes use 5-6 of them in
    a small room.

    Y Sol
    Last edited by Y Sol; 7th February 2010 at 12:09.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Y Sol View Post
    Here is a shot from a bar in a hotel on a German island.
    I used two 1000W Arri spots outside and some 150W Dedolights inside.
    I love to shot with the Dedolights and sometimes use 5-6 of them in
    a small room.

    Y Sol
    Sweet shot! I've been eyeing those dedolights for some time now ... pricey little buggers.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!



    Cup of motor oil for an environmentally themed show. I just wrote over 500 words about this image on my blog yesterday so I'll be lazy and just link over to there:

    http://www.anonymousvernacular.com/2...-cup-one-acre/

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Y Sol View Post
    Here is a shot from a bar in a hotel on a German island.
    I used two 1000W Arri spots outside and some 150W Dedolights inside.
    I love to shot with the Dedolights and sometimes use 5-6 of them in
    a small room.

    Y Sol

    Please educate me, in a situation like this, is the idea to as closely replicate what it actually looks like in real life or to perfect it (i.e. get rid of that huge shadow in the centre)?
    I am not a painter, nor an artist. Therefore I can see straight, and that may be my undoing. - Alfred Stieglitz

    Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Ben,
    Not speaking for Y Sol, but my interpretation of this shot is an attempt to replicate morning or evening sun filtering in from the windows behind and left of the viewer, casting warm light and strong, long shadows. Further, the smaller lights are placed in such a way as to illuminate things that may be too dark to see details. Just how I saw what was posted.

    My comment about the too large shadow in the middle goes along with yours, plus the out of balance look of the light from the far window not matching that of the big Arri lights used for the glow. The rest of the shadows are sort of expected and create the depth and ambiance of what may usually be a more darkened room, but that is purely my interpretation of Y Sol's capture. I sill like the shot.

    LJ

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Rubinstein View Post
    Please educate me, in a situation like this, is the idea to as closely replicate what it actually looks like in real life or to perfect it (i.e. get rid of that huge shadow in the centre)?
    I can give an Art Directors POV on this shot ... to me the shot simulates late afternoon sun ... I've seen exactly this atmosphere many times while traveling. After a day out and about, you return to this inviting environment ... the end of day moment to relax and have a drink.

    Without the warm light and late afternoon shadows it would be informative, but sterile and boring.

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    Member Y Sol's Avatar
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Thank you fotografz,

    that was exactly the idea behind that shot.
    And after a long day of work have some cognac or armagnac
    and watch the sun go down.

    I love my job: its just the work that I hate.

    Y Sol
    Last edited by Y Sol; 7th February 2010 at 12:09.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Y Sol View Post
    Thank you fotografz,

    that was exactly the idea behind that shot.
    And after a long day of work have some cognac or armagnac
    and watch the sun go down.

    I love my job: its just the work that I hate.

    Y Sol
    LOL! Yes, but the work is worth it when you get what you were after. My motto is to make the assistants work, and for me to do more of what I love ...

    Many folks forget how cool it is to work with "hot" lights ... which are better referred to as "continuous" lighting.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Y Sol View Post
    Thank you fotografz,
    I love my job: its just the work that I hate.

    Y Sol
    That's my entire life!
    I am not a painter, nor an artist. Therefore I can see straight, and that may be my undoing. - Alfred Stieglitz

    Website: http://www.timelessjewishart.com

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Y Sol,
    That second shot you posted with the bottles in focus reminded me of coming back to the small but interesting hotels and inns in Scotland, where upon arriving after a day of whatever work, there was always a bottle or two of some local and very interesting single malt on a table with some glasses. You poured yourself a small glass, took a seat in a comfy leather chair and started the unwinding process. Usually you were joined by others for a brief spell. I remember how relaxing that entire experience was, and both of your shots brought those memories back. Thanks for sharing these shots.

    LJ

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    funny, my wife just ordered a couple of club chairs and i used your photo to illustrate the mood. i'm hoping bourbon will substitute for scotch or cognac when i kick back in that long light, end of the day setting.

    your photo was a success!

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    My motto is to make the assistants work, and for me to do more of what I love ...

    Many folks forget how cool it is to work with "hot" lights ... which are better referred to as "continuous" lighting.
    The assistants, who presumably are the ones who have to burn themselves setting up and moving them, probably will still refer to them as "hot lights"... or more likely, "@#$% hot &$#*ing lights"...

  26. #26
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    I learned something last weekend when I did this promo shot for an upcoming modern dance concert:


    Most of the setup was typical for how I do these. To get the background (just a light-colored wall) to go white, I aimed two heads (one about 8' high and the other about 3' high) at the wall from one side and one head (about midway between the others in height) from the other. I set the basic exposure to just blow out the wall to white, using the camera histogram for reference. Then I set the power on the front light to provide correct subject exposure at the same setting. (I've sketched a diagram and will add it later.)

    What was different about this vs. my usual formula was that in the past, I've always run my main light through a 36-inch octagonal softbox to give nice soft light. This time, I used a 16-inch "beauty dish" with a spun aluminum interior (the cheap one that Ephoto Discounters used to sell for about $35; would post a link, but they don't list it right now.)

    I had half-feared that dish would produce light that was too harsh -- but there was so much bounceback from the white wall that the shadows filled in nicely, I think.

    What I liked about the dish was that the crisper shadows made the dancers' muscles look more defined -- look at the arms of the woman on the right, for example. (By the way, can you believe that she's a mother of five?!?)

    Another advantage of the dish is that because it's so much more efficient than the softbox, I could position it farther away -- about 12 feet from the subjects -- and still get enough exposure. Putting the light farther away meant less variation between subjects closer to the light and subjects farther from the light (because a given distance change is a smaller percentage of the total distance.) That gave the dancers a bigger space in which they could move without my having to worry about exposure changes.

    So, I learned that a "harder" light doesn't need to be harsh, and a smaller light can give more even exposure than a larger one! Counter-intuitive (for me) but good to know...

  27. #27
    Jonathan H
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Here's a piece I wrote for Strobist sometime last year, but I figure it's pretty appropriate for the conversation. Enjoy!

    As many of the incoming members to this group already know, one of the most important ways to add drama and visual impact to a photograph is through the use of lighting. I imagine many of the photographers coming into this new group are coming in from the Strobist group and very possibly new to the whole idea of strobe lighting. I'm going to describe a bit of the thought process that goes into conceptualizing a photograph, and then deciding HOW to light the subject, based on the final concept dreamed up.

    When I first got into this whole lighting thing, before Strobist even existed, (but not too long ago... I'm still a young'un), I didn't know very much at all about actually designing light. I just blasted my subject with light from an arbitrary angle, usually 45 degrees off the camera's axis, and only because that's what I'd seen once or twice in a book. Or something. As I shot more and more and really began to study the effects of lighting, I began to see how light and shadow interact, how they effect the dynamic of a photograph, and how to best use them to create compelling imagery. Being able to instinctively see the light that will eventually shoot forth for 1/3000 of a second is the keystone to becoming a competent studio photographer. Of course, this holds true both in the studio or on location, with large, powerful studio lighting, or small and light Vivitar 285's.

    I'd like to present one of my recent photos. This was shot as a personal piece for stock and more importantly, for pure enjoyment.



    In climbing, there's a move called a "dyno" - short for "dynamic." Essentially, it's a "dynamic" jump which allows you to reach a hold that you would otherwise not be able to reach because it's too far away. Dynos require a substantial amount of strength and athleticism - I wanted to showcase the jump, the climber's feet swinging in mid air, and the intense level of overall body strength required to pull off the move. I grabbed my insanely strong buddy Simon to help me pull it off.

    Set up shot:


    As you can see, this was a 2-light shot. I was standing on the yellow ladder, shooting towards the camera's current perspective. Down low you see a large 3'x4' softbox. This illuminated the wall (to give context) and obviously, lit Simon as well. The second softbox (up high) is a 1'x3' strip box positioned horizontally directly behind Simon and gives the gorgeous highlight (if I do say so myself) along his shoes. I set it up this way both for 'flair' and to separate his black shoes from the dark interior of the climbing gym.

    The large white fake check was only added as an afterthought. I was getting substantial lens flare from the stripbox and needed a flag, but I had left all my grip equipment back at the studio and needed to improvise. I pulled the fake check off the wall (with the permission of management, of course) and gaffer taped it to another light stand. Worked like a charm

    The whole point of this: I could just as easily have been lazy and put up the key light on a stand next to me on the ladder, but that wouldn't have illuminated the rest of wall as evenly. In fact, that's where I initially positioned it. However, I was unhappy with my results and spent a bit of time searching for a better light position until I found what's seen in the above shot. Had the strip box been positioned anywhere but directly behind him, the characteristics of the light would have been totally different and not given the smooth highlight along his soles and legs, but a harsher rim light, which I didn't want.

    Actually having a purpose and a plan for your lighting is absolutely essential to turning out polished work. Learn the behaviors of your modifiers inside and out so you can accurately predict how each will shape the light... don't guess and check during a live shoot. Once you bore your model (or in this case, exhaust your climber), you've probably "lost the battle."

    I hope this kicks off a great new group and I'm hoping to learn even more than I'm planning to share. Happy shooting!

    -Jonathan

    (Oh, for what it's worth, those were Dynalite 4040 heads inside Chimera softboxes, each running off an individual Dynalite 1000WS pack).

  28. #28
    Member Frank Doorhof's Avatar
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Hi,
    Shot with strobes (2 to be precise) and because there were lights in the dress asked the model to stay very still and used a 1/4th of second shutter time to also register the lights.


  29. #29
    gdwhalen
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Here's one.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by gdwhalen View Post
    Here's one.
    Nice table top shot. My Dad was a knife collector ... he would have liked that one.

    Post bigger images please ... long side 900 pixels.

    Tell us how you lit it also !!!

    -Marc

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Two catalog shots, using El. BX:

    product shot detail, 2 strobes, one sb + one snoot/grid 12 - white background



    atmosphere shot, 1 strobe beauty dish roughly 45/45 plus... wrapped paper sheet diagonally attached to dish front... - white background

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Working on a set of images on my printing process:



    Lit by 1 Photek Softliter ii:



    Here are 2 more images for the project:




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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    Working on a set of images on my printing process:



    Lit by 1 Photek Softliter ii:



    Here are 2 more images for the project:



    BEAUTIFUL!

    Care to explain your printing process?

    -Marc

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by fotografz View Post
    BEAUTIFUL!

    Care to explain your printing process?

    -Marc
    Marc, you don't know much this makes my day as I've followed your work on photo.net for many, many years and have been inspired by countless shots you've posted.

    I print in gum bichromate over palladium if that helps--I make a palladium print then 1 or more gum bichromate layer on top of that. It's a very labor intensive process I find immensely rewarding. The images are made while I am actually printing one of the earlier imagges. I started with an image of my brush, for example, and made the image of the palladium drops while measuring to coat this print:



    Here's a little blurb about the project I had to write for a show submission:

    These images are from the series Process in which I explore the creation of the print and the value of process. The series breaks the notion of "craft" down into discrete photographs of the steps and tools involved in the process to investigate the relationship between the tangible and intangible. My method, inspired by gestalt psychology and phenomenology, builds upon earlier bodies of work examining such ideas as "the sacred" and "suburbia".
    This is actually a project I've had noodling in my brain for some time. My dominant arm is sling-bound for the foreseeable future, though, so I decided it was time to get started as I can still do these with one hand--they just take a while as I only have the one hand and am having to re-train myself to coat paper with my left hand
    Last edited by Jeremy; 30th October 2009 at 18:08.

  35. #35
    Super Duper
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post
    Marc, you don't know much this makes my day as I've followed your work on photo.net for many, many years and have been inspired by countless shots you've posted.

    I print in gum bichromate over palladium if that helps--I make a palladium print then 1 or more gum bichromate layer on top of that. It's a very labor intensive process I find immensely rewarding.

    Here's a little blurb about the project I had to write for a show submission:



    This is actually a project I've had noodling in my brain for some time. My dominant arm is sling-bound for the foreseeable future, though, so I decided it was time to get started as I can still do these with one hand--they just take a while

    This is an example of one of gum over prints that I may have posted in the alt process thread running around on here:

    I have always loved some of the pure processes of photography ... which are totally lost on the internet/digital crowd ... there is just something about seeing a hand done print in person using some of the elaborate and time intense processes available.

    Hats off to you not only for the work itself, but for craftsmanship and loving hand required to make things of such beauty.

    PLease post more ... perhaps in the analog threads where it will garner a wider audience and much earned appreciation.

    -Marc

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    A few more of the lighting shots and a variant on the distilled h2o picture (i'm curious what others think about the 2 choices)








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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    i think this 2nd image of the distilled water might fit better with the other images i've made.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    I got my first studio light setup last week (Elinchrom D-Lite-4 2 head kit). Been practising today with my daughter.

    I'm just getting to grips with one light at the moment. These were shot through an umbrella at 45% and above the model (to camera left) with a silver reflector on the other side.





    Mark Tomlinson www.marktomlinson.org.uk/photography
    Sony A900; Nex 7; Fuji X-100; Ricoh GRD II
    Blogs at: alt-digital.blogspot.com

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!



    more fun with the lights.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy View Post


    more fun with the lights.
    What a great photo!

    My little Chi gives it a ...

    -Marc

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    Senior Member irakly's Avatar
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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    here is a lil' example of a simple fact that it is not how many lights and what kind of bells and whistles, but how and where you place them

    two flash setup. regular reflector with a 20-degree grid and a 90x90cm softbox with no internal baffle.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Yummy light.
    basic combo is great. A directional source for modeling and some fill to control contrast.
    love it
    -bob

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    no, there is no fill. the second light source is for the wall. nothing is obvious

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Well, there is some, either ambient or just light bouncing around that fills in the shadows a bit, isn't there? I would have expected deeper shadows from a gridded reflector with out some fill.
    -bob
    Last edited by Bob; 24th November 2009 at 05:45.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    of course there is some ambiance, as it would be impossible to light a room this large with just two 600J flashes. using a grid for a fill light, however, is not a good idea. the best fill light is either diffused, or very soft.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    I fixed my sentence. No, I did not mean gridded fill LOL.
    It looks to me is that roughly two sops from main to shadowed portion of the face?

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    oh, that's what you mean? shadow depth depends less upon a light modifier than on a distance from a light source to a lit surface.

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Okay - here's some lighting - of lighting...First is the final shot and the two other images show the lighting setup.

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    OK enough with the equipment lets see some lighting

    Thanks for the suggestions. I will try to buy that book.

    I went to the Smith-Victor website and was kind of overwhelmed with all of the choices. What is some basic equipment I should start out with?


    Ben

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    Re: OK, enough with the equipment, lets see some lighting!

    Peter, thanks much for posting images of this incredible setup.

    Quote Originally Posted by pfigen View Post
    Okay - here's some lighting - of lighting...First is the final shot and the two other images show the lighting setup.

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