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Thread: Question for the DMF landscape masters

  1. #51
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    Re: Question for the DMF landscape masters

    Quote Originally Posted by timparkin View Post
    We didn't really mention the low frequency effects too much, rather we mentioned a loss of overall contrast. We haven't quantified this but for our particular images, a small amount of 'clarity' (larger radius unsharp mask) and a small increase in contrast worked fine with the only problem being a small loss in shadow separation. This was mainly noticeable on f/22 but with f/16 the problem was hardly visible and our 'real world' test subjects couldn't tell the difference.
    Have this test changed your view on which apertures you use when shooting digital? Ie do you use smaller apertures now?

    f/22 on a 135 system corresponds to ~f/32 on digital medium format and f/160 on 8x10" , so it's quite powerful in terms of depth of field to be able to shoot at these apertures.

  2. #52
    Senior Member etrump's Avatar
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    Re: Question for the DMF landscape masters

    It is easy to get caught up in the technical details of aperture and stacking. I think before you can make appropriate decisions you need to give yourself some time to adjust to DMF.

    While you can simply stop down a stop compared to 35mm you sacrifice the additional resolution in almost every case. That's not a big problem if you print smaller than 40" but as the print size increases you lose resolution and micro contrast that makes DMF prints so special. An IQ180 exposure should be clean enough to print 8' wide if your technique is good. To do that, your file has to look good at 100%.

    Just like switching from APSC to 35mm the transition will require a more precise technique. Tilt and focus stacking are fantastic tools but it's hard to connect with your subject when you are in left-brain tech mode. At first you should concentrate on learning the capabilities of your sensor and glass at the optimum aperture of around f/11 and stop down only as required.

    I always laugh when I look at "famous" photographers wall size prints and notice they routinely shoot at apertures a couple stops smaller than they should have and it shows in the print.

  3. #53
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    Re: Question for the DMF landscape masters

    Quote Originally Posted by timparkin View Post
    ...we've interviewed David about focus stacking for aurora photography recently (in "On Landscape")...
    I'd like to read what he has to say. Could you provide a link?

  4. #54
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    Re: Question for the DMF landscape masters

    Quote Originally Posted by torger View Post
    Have this test changed your view on which apertures you use when shooting digital? Ie do you use smaller apertures now?

    f/22 on a 135 system corresponds to ~f/32 on digital medium format and f/160 on 8x10" , so it's quite powerful in terms of depth of field to be able to shoot at these apertures.
    Hi,

    I haven't tested apertures on the IQ180 we have access to but from what I've seen there is very little degradation. I wouldn't use f/22 unless pushed into a corner on my D800 but f/16 is fine.

    From what I've played with I'd also then be happy to use f/22 on the IQ180 if pushed, f/32 on 6x7, f/45 on 4x5 and f/90 on 8x10

    Of course this all depends on the subject matter :-)

    Also a file has to be very smooth and clean to take lots of sharpening so it doesn't work as well on film as it does on a clean digital file.

    Tim

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