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270mm lens for 8x10 camera.

RodK

Member
There are 240mm and 250mm lenses that will cover 8x10. I do not know of a 270mm that will cover that has been made.
 

asnapper

New member
I agree the 270mm G Claron, covers well . I use to have the 300mm G Claron & I still have the 355mm G Claron, which covers 17x14 & 20x12 with movements
 

Oren Grad

Member
The Schneider Kreuznach G Claron 270mm is the lens he's looking for. Unfortunately they didn't make a lot of them and they don't come up for sale often because they are such an ideal lens for an 8X10 field camera.
The 270 Computar has even larger coverage than the G-Claron when stopped way down, but tends to be much harder to find and more expensive.

270 Graphic Kowa, but that's almost always found in barrel rather than shutter.

10 3/4" Dagor.
 

RodK

Member
The 270mm G-Claron will cover, but not much movement(IC 335mm) you need about 305 to cover the film. The Kowa and Computer offerings seem to be 4 element Tessar variations and would also probably have limited image circles. The G-Clarons were designed for close work and as such large enlargement did not often fare so well as the diffraction and best focus distance range was not conducive if large prints are the goal.
 

KC_2020

Member
The 270mm G-Claron will cover, but not much movement(IC 335mm) you need about 305 to cover the film. The Kowa and Computer offerings seem to be 4 element Tessar variations and would also probably have limited image circles. The G-Clarons were designed for close work and as such large enlargement did not often fare so well as the diffraction and best focus distance range was not conducive if large prints are the goal.
I said they were popular. Not ideal.

I helped teach a couple of workshops by a well known assistant of Ansel Adams in Monterey Valley years ago and everyone had a 270 G Claron. They were considered part of the standard field kit for 4X5 and 8X10.
 

Oren Grad

Member
The 270mm G-Claron will cover, but not much movement(IC 335mm) you need about 305 to cover the film. The Kowa and Computer offerings seem to be 4 element Tessar variations and would also probably have limited image circles. The G-Clarons were designed for close work and as such large enlargement did not often fare so well as the diffraction and best focus distance range was not conducive if large prints are the goal....

Congo was another brand name that was similar to the Computar offerings.
I've used the 270 G-Claron extensively on 8x10 and have used the 270 Computar on 11x14. Both of these lenses continue gaining useful image circle when stopped down past f/22. At f/45, the G-Claron provides ample room for movement on 8x10, while the Computar covers 11x14. Whether they provide sufficient quality for "large enlargement" is in the eye of the beholder. Many people working with 8x10 or larger these days are contact printing, either in silver or in alt processes, or scanning for hybrid processes. Regardless, if one has very particular requirements in this respect there is no alternative but to run one's own comparative tests on whatever lenses are under consideration. But the 240 and longer G-Clarons are widely used for 8x10.

The Computar is not a Tessar - it's a six-element symmetrical plasmat. The Graphic Kowas are a bit trickier - cosmetically they look identical to the Computars, but not all of them share the same ultra-large coverage.

The Computars and Graphic Kowas bear no relationship to any of the Congo line.
 
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arri

Active member
I´am using a 270mm G-Claron with my 810 Toyo and I won´t miss this lens, it is very small and light weight and it has a large image circle.
Forget the 64° Schneider mentioned in the lists, this angle of view is only important for raprographic use because with a larger used angle the lens shows vignetting.
For classic photography it is not important because the vignetting is very low.
The correct angle of view of the Plasmat design G-Claron is 84° and this means the lens has more and 400mm image circle.
The older Dagor style G-Claron has an angle of view of nearly 90°
The 150mm Dagor/G-Claron can be use with 18x24cm withount and with 8x10" with small dark corners but sharp over the whole circle when stoped down.
 
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