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A7r IV

iiiNelson

Well-known member
Fair points, all. But I think all the brands are now trying to get on the mirrorless wagon and future direction seems to be towards small(er) bodies. Whether these are ergonomically suited to people with larger hands remains to be seen. I suppose one could design a body that is small and yet easy to use for everyone, but I suspect real estate becomes more precious the smaller the body gets and therefore harder to implement all the controls.

We all want the camera to have every possible option that suits us and yet be of the perfect size for our own physical attributes. Combine that with certain specific requirements that matter a lot to some of us (somebody wanted a three-way articulating screen as top priority) and you end up with a pretty darned good camera that will make many people ecstatic, but won't please everyone.

Small size too can only go so far. I for one would not be interested in the likes of the new Sigma FF - way too small even for me.

The one thing that seems to be obvious to me, the days of the full-sized 1DX/1DS type bodies are over.
I agree but the only Mirrorless camera the size of a D5/1D are the medium format cameras with a grip attached.

Even the largest FF camera (LUMIX S) is smaller than the 5D/Dxxx cameras. I think a FF camera on par with the Fuji XH1 would be ideal in size personally. Not too big but not too small.
 

Pradeep

Member
I agree but the only Mirrorless camera the size of a D5/1D are the medium format cameras with a grip attached.

Even the largest FF camera (LUMIX S) is smaller than the 5D/Dxxx cameras. I think a FF camera on par with the Fuji XH1 would be ideal in size personally. Not too big but not too small.

The MF world is also going smaller, the Phase One Mamiya clone was a monster, the P-645Z too was huge. The only people who are still into large rigs are the dedicated landscape photographers with technical cameras/mounts who are patient enough to be able to deal with all the vagaries of such equipment. That niche too is shrinking as people begin to realize that you can get the same (or close to) results with lighter and smaller cameras. I think there comes a point where value for commercial work becomes more important than the passion and joy of photography. I cannot speak for the pros since I am still an amateur.

I suppose there are still people out there who shoot with technical cams for the pure joy it provides. For them photography is very much an art form. In this age of instant gratification, they must be very few such people.
 

Audii-Dudii

Active member
I suppose there are still people out there who shoot with technical cams for the pure joy it provides. For them photography is very much an art form. In this age of instant gratification, they must be very few such people.
As I noted in my initial post above, there is at least one such person in existence and he's doing so using a Sony A7R body, too! :loco:



Alas, he won't ever be able to do so using the A7RIV because of the *&^@*!& grip Sony gave that camera! :mad:
 

cerett

Member
As I noted in my initial post above, there is at least one such person in existence and he's doing so using a Sony A7R body, too! :loco:



Alas, he won't ever be able to do so using the A7RIV because of the *&^@*!& grip Sony gave that camera! :mad:
Very impressed with your whole set-up! Keep enjoying the rlll, still a great camera. Cheers.
 

vjbelle

Well-known member
I had hoped that Focus stacking/shift would be incorporated but I guess not. The camera is a nogo for me without that feature.

Victor
 

algrove

Well-known member
As I noted in my initial post above, there is at least one such person in existence and he's doing so using a Sony A7R body, too! :loco:



Alas, he won't ever be able to do so using the A7RIV because of the *&^@*!& grip Sony gave that camera! :mad:
I'm curious to know what screen setup you are using. Thanks.
 

Audii-Dudii

Active member
I'm curious to know what screen setup you are using. Thanks.
The monitor is a Lilliput A12, which has a 12.5" diagonal screen and native 3840 x 2160 resolution:



(FYI, the latter is overkill for my present A7R, which outputs a 2k HDMI signal, but the A7RIII and A7RIV output 4k HDMI signals on playback, so the additional resolution will be useful if / when I upgrade.)

FYI, I need the larger external screen because I photograph at night and the larger display makes it much easier for me to compose and focus under challenging conditions, as well as to confirm focus and depth of field when reviewing the captured photos before striking the camera and moving onto the next scene:



Also, the larger display is essential when I'm using my VX23D view camera and applying small amounts of tilt and swing movements, as well as rise / fall / shift movements:

 

Pradeep

Member
The monitor is a Lilliput A12, which has a 12.5" diagonal screen and native 3840 x 2160 resolution:



(FYI, the latter is overkill for my present A7R, which outputs a 2k HDMI signal, but the A7RIII and A7RIV output 4k HDMI signals on playback, so the additional resolution will be useful if / when I upgrade.)

FYI, I need the larger external screen because I photograph at night and the larger display makes it much easier for me to compose and focus under challenging conditions, as well as to confirm focus and depth of field when reviewing the captured photos before striking the camera and moving onto the next scene:



Also, the larger display is essential when I'm using my VX23D view camera and applying small amounts of tilt and swing movements, as well as rise / fall / shift movements:
Awesome! And the very reason why I hang out here. It is so good to see the passion and dedication you bring to the art of photography. I wish I had the time but life has a habit of getting in the way :)

Thanks for sharing the photos.
 

Audii-Dudii

Active member
Awesome! And the very reason why I hang out here. It is so good to see the passion and dedication you bring to the art of photography. I wish I had the time but life has a habit of getting in the way :)
I know how that goes, because more than a decade ago, a very demanding day job left me only the late night hours to photograph, so I made the best of it.

This proved to be a turning point for me and my relationship with photography and today, I can't imagine being anywhere near as satisfied with any other outcome.

As for tinkering with cameras, that's as much a means to an end as a hobby in itself. For a time, there were no commercially available options available to meet my needs, so I had to make them myself. <shrugs>

Thanks for sharing the photos.
And thanks for the kind words!

P.S.: If you're curious, I post a new photo every other day at my photo-blog: https://audiidudii.aminus3.com/ ... check it out!
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
This is for Tre. This guy too is 6'3" and with big hands :)

Shows the r3 and r4 side by side, the grip is clearly bigger and there is more clearance from the lens as well.

Pretty impressive AF too, as per the brief report.
Thanks. I’ll check the camera out once it’s released this fall... I was just hoping for a bit more. I’ll be heading to Asia over the weekend to do some work out there with probably just the 35/1.4 and 55/1.8 in tow. I considered selling my 35/1.4 for the 35/1.8 but I’m not sure that I will yet.

On a side note i did try out the 24, 135, and 200-600 last Saturday briefly. They’re all great lenses. I imagine the 200-600 is a must have for anyone that cares about wildlife photography or an affordable sports lens option.
 

SrMphoto

Active member
Kudos to Sony for fixing one of most annoying things: card slot 1 is now on top and slot 2 is at the bottom and not vice versa as on a7riii.
 

JeRuFo

Active member
On paper I'm very impressed, and find it revolutionary in the sense that it has all the improvements and attributes to make it a truly allround camera which makes it easy to get the most from:

- High resolution. Same pixel pitch as the 150MP sensor, but with PDAF over a large part of the sensor, pretty much all we could hope for.
- Enormous dynamic range and usable ISO range
- Very good AF. No need to choose between speed and resolution anymore.
- Good weather sealing
- Dual card slots.
- Impressive IBIS, especially since it is so
- small and portable, but with better handling.
- A full lens line to choose from, with options in the most used focal lengths and plenty of 3rd party options.
- Tilting screen
 

Pradeep

Member
I know how that goes, because more than a decade ago, a very demanding day job left me only the late night hours to photograph, so I made the best of it.

This proved to be a turning point for me and my relationship with photography and today, I can't imagine being anywhere near as satisfied with any other outcome.

As for tinkering with cameras, that's as much a means to an end as a hobby in itself. For a time, there were no commercially available options available to meet my needs, so I had to make them myself. <shrugs>



And thanks for the kind words!

P.S.: If you're curious, I post a new photo every other day at my photo-blog: https://audiidudii.aminus3.com/ ... check it out!
Jeffrey, Love the photos, especially 10101. Read your blog and the journey you've taken so far. I too have dabbled with IR, but put it aside for now - again, too much happening in personal life. I did find that the lens makes a big difference with IR, most of the ones I used have too much of a bright spot in the center. I got my older a7r3 modified for IR. Will start working on night photos to see if that look is different. Seeing your work has given me some great ideas.

And I agree completely, nothing is as satisfying as holding a print in your hand. Thanks for sharing.
 

Audii-Dudii

Active member
Jeffrey, Love the photos, especially 10101. Read your blog and the journey you've taken so far.
As always, thanks for your kind words about my photos. Now that I'm semi-retired and living on a tight budget, photography -- both taking photos and tinkering with cameras -- has become my primary hobby, because it can be surprisingly affordable once you have all the gear you need.

Also, when you do it the way I do -- on foot, walking several miles on each outing and undertaking several outings each week -- it's also a sneaky way of getting some exercise, too! Two stones, one bird, and all that...

I too have dabbled with IR, but put it aside for now - again, too much happening in personal life. I did find that the lens makes a big difference with IR, most of the ones I used have too much of a bright spot in the center. I got my older a7r3 modified for IR. Will start working on night photos to see if that look is different. Seeing your work has given me some great ideas.
I previously worked in the legal field and traveled regularly to NYC to attend depositions or document productions, etc. I always brought a camera with me and whenever I could, I would walk around (both at night and during the day) photographing on the streets, often tacking an extra day onto my stays or sometimes a weekend. I envy you your (apparent) access to NYC and suspect I could happily spend the remainder of my days walking around, exploring, and taking photos there. :D

At the risk of being immodest, I've become quite skilled with nighttime photography and will be happy to answer any questions about it you might have or share some tips about to optimize the experience as well as the quality of photos taken using long exposures. I have also become generally knowledgeable about infrared photography, too, although I'm still learning about photographing at night using infrared light, because I only started experimenting with this two or three weeks ago and the technical aspects of it are proving to be quite a bit trickier to master than I expected...

And I agree completely, nothing is as satisfying as holding a print in your hand. Thanks for sharing.
I confess that even I am printing quite a bit less these days than I once did. Now that I no longer have any ambitions to monetize my photography by selling prints, combined with my necessarily frugal lifestyle, I don't see much value in making prints just to put them back in the boxes whence the paper came, then store the boxes full of prints underneath a bed or in the back of a closet. I will do so for special occasions or to make a print for others, but the days of printing every decent photo I take are now fading into my past. <sigh>
 

Pradeep

Member
As always, thanks for your kind words about my photos. Now that I'm semi-retired and living on a tight budget, photography -- both taking photos and tinkering with cameras -- has become my primary hobby, because it can be surprisingly affordable once you have all the gear you need.

Also, when you do it the way I do -- on foot, walking several miles on each outing and undertaking several outings each week -- it's also a sneaky way of getting some exercise, too! Two stones, one bird, and all that...
I hear you. nothing like exercise, any way you can get it. I think the problem with most of us is gear lust, otherwise it is indeed much cheaper today than it used to be in the days of film overall.

I previously worked in the legal field and traveled regularly to NYC to attend depositions or document productions, etc. I always brought a camera with me and whenever I could, I would walk around (both at night and during the day) photographing on the streets, often tacking an extra day onto my stays or sometimes a weekend. I envy you your (apparent) access to NYC and suspect I could happily spend the remainder of my days walking around, exploring, and taking photos there. :D
Yes, I do have access to NYC, I am only 20 miles out from mid-town. And yet, there is little opportunity for photography. Hopefully when I retire in a few years and still live in the area it would be nice. I do manage to get down to Nickerson Beach once in a while to shoot the nesting colonies there, but that's about all.

At the risk of being immodest, I've become quite skilled with nighttime photography and will be happy to answer any questions about it you might have or share some tips about to optimize the experience as well as the quality of photos taken using long exposures. I have also become generally knowledgeable about infrared photography, too, although I'm still learning about photographing at night using infrared light, because I only started experimenting with this two or three weeks ago and the technical aspects of it are proving to be quite a bit trickier to master than I expected...



I confess that even I am printing quite a bit less these days than I once did. Now that I no longer have any ambitions to monetize my photography by selling prints, combined with my necessarily frugal lifestyle, I don't see much value in making prints just to put them back in the boxes whence the paper came, then store the boxes full of prints underneath a bed or in the back of a closet. I will do so for special occasions or to make a print for others, but the days of printing every decent photo I take are now fading into my past. <sigh>
I am going to take you up on your offer of help ;)

I too love night photography, especially of the urban landscape, but have very limited experience of IR, particularly at night time. Perhaps we can move this aspect of the discussion to the IR thread.

Prints are the ultimate test of the quality of an image, for me at least and I do print small size samples of my favorite images from a workshop. Yes, these usually end up in a box in a drawer, but from these I often select a few to print large (20x30 or even bigger if needed) and these end up in my office or in my basement where I usually rotate them every couple of years. Every now and then a friend/colleague or family member will ask for a copy which makes me very happy. I have never sold anything, nor do I intend to, that is a whole new ball game I do not wish to get into....

But yes, printing is a great delight for me. Problem is the printer sits idle more than it should and gets clogged :mad:
 
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