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Change from Sony E-Mount to Canon RF

anyone

Well-known member
Hi,
I'm currently thinking to switch my mirrorless kit and would like to ask if anyone has done a similar step?

Besides medium and large format, I currently have a Ricoh GR III + Sony A6300 for occasional shooting. I use it just for relaxing, all serious work is done with the larger format. However, I never have been a fan of the Sony's usability, colours, and tiny viewfinder. On the pro-side, I could adapt all my lenses, mainly Minolta MD and Canon EF which I own from the times before medium format (the latter with not-so-great AF performance). The main reason to keep the Sony was it's video capabilities, but it turns out that I use them seldom and want full frame to get the full potential of my wide EF lenses.

Now, with my mixed Sony experience (and rather good memories about Canon colours and usability) I may take the step to buy into the Canon RF system. The R5 / R6 are too expensive for my purposes (my main system will be still medium format), so I guess a Canon R would be my camera of choice. Lovely that I could use my old batteries from my Canon 5D mk II in it, really nice from Canon! The competitor, Sony A7 III, costs about the same and has better specs, but I'm afraid of it's menu system ;-)

So, has anyone done a similar move? How is your experience with colours, usability, and autofocus? Since this is my "fun walkaround camera", it should be also fun and easy to use.

Thank you!
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
I really enjoyed the Canon R and have no desire for the R5/R6. I used to shoot Nikon, but wanted Canon colors and f/1.2 lenses. I shoot professionally with a Canon RP and love the form factor (with grip) and might purchase an EOSr as a back up camera. The RP reminds me of a analog new F1 film camera. I'm using an FD 85mm 1.2L and a EF 35mm f/1.4L with (hard to find adapter), but so far love this combo. I did have the RF 50mm 1.2L, but sold it after I did a comparison demo with the EF 50mm 1.2. The EF 50mm 1.2 was 97% as good as the RF with better colors and sharper at f/5.6. The RF is a big lens to carry around for casual use though. The RP retails at $899. It's an incredible bargain, imo.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
Oh, I should mention that the AF with EF lenses on the RP is very good. I did not notice any difference between the RF and EF 50mm 1.2. AS mentioned, the colors from the EF were more accurate and only at f/1.2 was there a slight improvement with the RF version. However, with a few tweaks, the EF was just as good as the RF at f/1.2. Hence, why I switched to EF lenses. Also, for some shoots deliberately flaring the lens for effect is much nicer than the RF too. I did own the Sony A7RII and much prefer the Canon's menus, ergonomics and intuitiveness. EOSr's are also a great bargain too.
 

anyone

Well-known member
It does sound like a convincing package. I will need to part with my E-Mount kit first, but then I will make the change. Thank you for your insights!
 

iiiNelson

Active member
Hi,
I'm currently thinking to switch my mirrorless kit and would like to ask if anyone has done a similar step?

Besides medium and large format, I currently have a Ricoh GR III + Sony A6300 for occasional shooting. I use it just for relaxing, all serious work is done with the larger format. However, I never have been a fan of the Sony's usability, colours, and tiny viewfinder. On the pro-side, I could adapt all my lenses, mainly Minolta MD and Canon EF which I own from the times before medium format (the latter with not-so-great AF performance). The main reason to keep the Sony was it's video capabilities, but it turns out that I use them seldom and want full frame to get the full potential of my wide EF lenses.

Now, with my mixed Sony experience (and rather good memories about Canon colours and usability) I may take the step to buy into the Canon RF system. The R5 / R6 are too expensive for my purposes (my main system will be still medium format), so I guess a Canon R would be my camera of choice. Lovely that I could use my old batteries from my Canon 5D mk II in it, really nice from Canon! The competitor, Sony A7 III, costs about the same and has better specs, but I'm afraid of it's menu system ;-)

So, has anyone done a similar move? How is your experience with colours, usability, and autofocus? Since this is my "fun walkaround camera", it should be also fun and easy to use.

Thank you!
I didn’t switch to Canon but I did add a Panasonic L-mount camera to my Sony kit. I looked at Canon and I like many of their lenses but didn’t care for their bodies. I haven’t tried the R5/6 yet so maybe there are big improvements over the EOS R ergonomically. As for colors, I think it really comes down to personal preference... when shooting RAW, I think color matters less than ones skills in editing and properly white balancing IMO.

As for menus a part of me doesn’t get the argument with regular and continued use. It becomes second nature with actual usage... but if you come from Canon cameras then perhaps there’s a level of familiarity. I can say that there are things that some Sony menus do better than other cameras and vice versa. With the EOS R you’re giving up a lot of video features and I lean towards the reality that it may be worth saving for the R6 or R5 as there seem to be enough benefits to owning them over the EOS R IMO
 

pegelli

Well-known member
I'd say rent or borrow one before you sell your old stuff and see if you like it better.
Despite all the great intentions and good advice from other members here only you can say if it's better for you or not.

Jumping ship to another brand is an expensive endeavor and it's even worse if you regret it and want to jump back.
There's no bad systems out there today, the trick is to find the one that suits you best and even if you found it sometimes the grass on the other side still looks greener :)
 

anyone

Well-known member
As for colors, I think it really comes down to personal preference... when shooting RAW, I think color matters less than ones skills in editing and properly white balancing IMO.
It's true - it is possible to get nice colours out of almost all systems. However, some make it easier for me than others - as this is my 'fun' camera, a (to my eye, very subjective) pleasing image as starter provides added value.

As for menus a part of me doesn’t get the argument with regular and continued use. It becomes second nature with actual usage... but if you come from Canon cameras then perhaps there’s a level of familiarity.
Since I used the A6300 now for quite some time and still cannot get used to it, Sony and my taste in usability just do not fit together :) In the past, when I picked up any Canon DSLR, there was only little adaptation needed to get to speed. Hope this is the same with the R.

Jumping ship to another brand is an expensive endeavor and it's even worse if you regret it and want to jump back.
There's no bad systems out there today, the trick is to find the one that suits you best and even if you found it sometimes the grass on the other side still looks greener :)
Agree - there are no bad systems, just some that fit the own preferences better than others. In this case, my switch to RF won't be too expensive since I have only one E-Mount lens - the rest was Canon EF anyway, so it's just two adapters. All my Canon accessories seem to be still usable with the new camera, which I really like.

My use case - fun walkaround camera - has probably some implications: very little effort needed for post processing, pleasing colors for the start, highest resolution not really needed. For every 'serious' attempt to photography I use my medium format gear.

In the end, I might just give it a try. In normal times I would have visited a shop and tried the camera first, but this time shipping will do.
 

iiiNelson

Active member
It's true - it is possible to get nice colours out of almost all systems. However, some make it easier for me than others - as this is my 'fun' camera, a (to my eye, very subjective) pleasing image as starter provides added value.



Since I used the A6300 now for quite some time and still cannot get used to it, Sony and my taste in usability just do not fit together :) In the past, when I picked up any Canon DSLR, there was only little adaptation needed to get to speed. Hope this is the same with the R.



Agree - there are no bad systems, just some that fit the own preferences better than others. In this case, my switch to RF won't be too expensive since I have only one E-Mount lens - the rest was Canon EF anyway, so it's just two adapters. All my Canon accessories seem to be still usable with the new camera, which I really like.

My use case - fun walkaround camera - has probably some implications: very little effort needed for post processing, pleasing colors for the start, highest resolution not really needed. For every 'serious' attempt to photography I use my medium format gear.

In the end, I might just give it a try. In normal times I would have visited a shop and tried the camera first, but this time shipping will do.
I don't actually have a lot of experience with the newer Sony APS-C cameras but I never really loved the bodies of them beyond "point & shoot" usage. The lack of a front dial ensured that I'd never invest into one for myself but for someone that would keep in essentially in an "auto" mode I understand where it wouldn't be a problem. I really only use FF Sony cameras and honestly I prefer the color out the box on the older Sony cameras compared to the newer ones in most cases. A funny point though, is that many people choose the Sony colors out the camera in side by sides out the box that many reviewers have posted over the last few years. As for Canon color I know it's subjectively more pleasing for many and so much of that is really determined by what and how you shoot IMO (which is why I stated that there are so many factors and PP skills is usually a bigger factor due to being able to import images at a different baseline color profile if one wanted to.) I think Canon has a saturated look out the box and a boosted red/magenta channel so threoretically you could create a Sony profile that gets you to a better started profile if you didn't want to spend money or had a limited budget until you figured out which way you wanted to go.

It may be a better proposition to go with Canon regardless if most of your kit is comprised of EOS EF lenses though. Canon has an outstanding set of anti adapters and it makes the choice to go to Canon FF make that much more sense. I'm not sure how much a A6300 commands on the used market these days but another option for the camera if you don't get much value for it in return is to convert it to IR or Monochrome as another backup "fun" camera.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
I agree, that if you can try first it helps with a gear decision. That's exactly why I switched from RF to EF lenses. The copy of the EF 50mm 1.2L from LensRentals was so good , I couldn't resist. In regards, to colors, I also agree RAW is the result of a more personal, subjective edit, but SOOC, nothing beats Canon's colors, imo, and I've tried them all:)
 

pegelli

Well-known member
In this case, my switch to RF won't be too expensive since I have only one E-Mount lens - the rest was Canon EF anyway, so it's just two adapters. All my Canon accessories seem to be still usable with the new camera, which I really like.
Agree, in that case it's easier and not so expensive to make the switch. You might even decide to hold on to your old one body/one lens and sell it after you're fully setlled and happy with the new system. Good luck choosing, new equipment is always fun :cool:
 

anyone

Well-known member
Now the question remains open, whether the RP is good enough as fun walkaround camera vs the R.
My main concerns are dynamic range and usability.

R
+ use of already available batteries
+ seems to have higher dynamic range and slightly higher resolution
- I'm not sure whether the touch bar is a really good idea, and dpreview is reporting some quirky ergonomics (surprising for a Canon camera)

RP
+ cheaper
+ more familiar controls
- have to buy batteries (well, not a big investment in the end)
 

anyone

Well-known member
Just wanted to let you know that my final choice will be the RP due to the familiarity of the controls. And in the end, I might upgrade the body in a few years when the IBIS will be also in lower priced bodies.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
I've enjoyed the RP, but just make sure you don't overexpose the highlights. It's like shooting E6 film, in that, you expose for the highlights. Rich colors and a cinematic quality make this my most used camera to date. Enjoy!
 
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