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M4/3 to Leica

Robert Campbell

Well-known member
Didn't you get to play with bluestone crystals at school? And yes, doesn't it do something against some sort of vine rot? Or was it potato rot?

BTW, what's a Canon 500D -- close-up lens attachment?
 

jonoslack

Active member
Didn't you get to play with bluestone crystals at school?
Yes - Copper Sulphate, but they weren't called 'bluestone crystals' in my day!


And yes, doesn't it do something against some sort of vine rot? Or was it potato rot?
Phylloxera - killed off half the french wine industry in the 19th century.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bordeaux_mixture


Bordeaux mixture (copper sulphate and hydrated lime) was used for that (and for other fungus infections like Phytophthera infestans (the potato blight).

Sometimes you can find lovely blue deposits on brick walls where it was mixed/poured/spilt.

Incidentally, I would like to state at this point that I managed to pluck the species 'Phytophthera infestans' straight out of the raddled remains of my brain, without recourse to any google based aid.
:clap::clap::clap::clap:

BTW, what's a Canon 500D -- close-up lens attachment?
Yes - that's the one!
 

Robert Campbell

Well-known member
Jono, your erudition is quite amazing :salute:; and to think I imagined that the closest you got to Bordeaux - whether mixed or not - was drinking it.
 

Robert Campbell

Well-known member
Your mention of copper sulphate in Bordeaux mixture, and its use against potato blight reminds me that I visisted Strokestown House earlier in the year. It's the home of the National Famine Museum.
http://www.strokestownpark.ie/museum.html
One of the exhibits says that the use copper sulphate -- I think alone -- was suggested in the early phases of the Irish Potato Famine in the mid 1840s. The idea was turned down. The population of Ireland is still less today than in 1841.
 
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Vivek

Guest
This one was shot under FL light in a post office. 50/0.95, again at 0.95.
Focused on the rim of the glasses of the man.

 
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Vivek

Guest
Couple more.. ('Cron40/2). Extremely light weight and low profile set-up.

f/2.8



f/2

 

scho

Well-known member
Vivek, Very impressive images. Are you still street shooting with the waist level approach?

Regards,
Carl
 
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Vivek

Guest
Carl, That is the way to use this camera (at least for me) and I am very delighted that I can do waist level shooting.:)

Since I opened the thread with a picture of the CV15 lens, here is a shot (I still have to get used to this lens with this crop) though it. f/4.5 focused on one of the red berries on the pie on the left. This camera actually allows one to see OOF regions projected by this lens (because one can actually focus it). I will see if I can figure out soon how to use this lens effectively to show that.

 

scho

Well-known member
Carl, That is the way to use this camera (at least for me) and I am very delighted that I can do waist level shooting.:)

Since I opened the thread with a picture of the CV15 lens, here is a shot (I still have to get used to this lens with this crop) though it. f/4.5 focused on one of the red berries on the pie on the left. This camera actually allows one to see OOF regions projected by this lens (because one can actually focus it). I will see if I can figure out soon how to use this lens effectively to show that.

Luscious - both the tarts and the image! I liked using the CV15 on my M8, but was never able to actually focus the lens for close work so looking forward to using it properly on the G1.
 
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Vivek

Guest
I might as well throw these ones as it used the M4/3 to Leica adapter.

A Leitz Milar 10cm lens was the macro lens. ~3.5X magnification. Bee was (dead) a test specimen. I used a Novoflex coldlight source with 3 fiberoptic out put cables.





The compound eye of the Bee covered with hairs. One needs a real Macro lens to see that.

Now, here is the set-up (of course, it was secured while taking the shots).



The Bee shots were @ ISO100, typically ~1/160s, lens was stopped down (not way down as diffraction sets in and everything shows mushy).
 
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Vivek

Guest
Thanks, Cindy.:)

No need for Visoflexes (a III could go for as much as a new G1 body!!);):D
 
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Vivek

Guest
Here is an ultra wide test shot (lousy weather). Kinoptik 9.8mm f/1.8 @ f/4, 1/50s, ISO640.



Yes, bokeh with an ultra-wide on a 0.5X crop sensor.
 
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Vivek

Guest
A couple of quick grabs.

The first from the ultra-wide (9.8mm f/1.8 @ f/8, ~60cm from the dirty car)



This one (B/W mode during the capture) using an ancient Hektor 135mm f/4.5 wide open, ISO1600, 1/200s. Nasty weather.

 

scho

Well-known member
Vivek, Your weather is almost as bad as ours. I haven't seen the sun for 2 weeks. Nice work with your amazing lens collection. Are all of these lenses adapted for the M mount?

Regards,
Carl
 
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Vivek

Guest
Hi Carl, The Kinoptik 9.8mm lens is an adapted lens (LTM and then an M adapter).

The 135mm f/4.5 Hektor is a straight M mount lens (RF coupling and all). I always wondered why they put a nice tripod mount on that tiny lens. It would come in very handy especially when used on the G1. The sample shot here was hand-held (not good, not fast enough shutter speed).

It is very windy and wet snow here. No trace of the Sun at all.
 

monza

New member
Vivek, regarding focusing of these M mount lenses, does the G1 automatically zoom the view or is that only with manual focus on the Panasonic lenses?

If it is manual, how does one do the zooming in?
 
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Vivek

Guest
Monza,

I don't understand the first part. I have not been using the kit zoom. All the samples shown here were using manual focus lenses.

I tried to make some shots to illustrate what I thought were your questions but I felt that is pointless.

If you have the camera, it will be easier to walk you through it. It is simple
(hey, even I could do it from day 1!!:D).

The shots through a Canon 50/0.95, wide open, should tell you something about focus accuracy, ease of focusing and the like. Equally illustrative would be the wide open shot of a fast moving person in a mini blizzard through a 135mm Hektor (the longest focal length lens from an M system).
 
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