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Medium Format and Coffee

nalye

Member
Just wait until you are really getting into puck preparation. WDT, RDT and such... But yes, it's going to be second nature once you understand the general usage.
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
That is what I enjoy so much about this forum... so many people with so much knowledge and willing to share . Thanks for the insight and encouragement!

Perhaps a few books for the Christmas stocking are in order? Maybe start out with something like this..


I think a small collection of books on coffee would be worthy of consideration now.

Long cold winter days with a wood fire, a coffee, a good book, and film drying in the shower sounds really good to me. LOL.
 

anyone

Well-known member
I opted now for a Flair signature and am very curious about the experience. It reflects my way of photography nicely: mostly manual, no frills. All what is needed is a good grinder (in my case a manual one, naturally), good coffee, and a kettle.
 

nalye

Member
I could stress out even more that a good grinder is the most important step in the whole chain. And the second most important would be repeatability. Once you eliminate all variables you can start experimenting and making connections as to what affects which part. For example: You are getting precisely 20.0g of coffee out of your grinder and you tamp evenly, then you start your machine and it takes exactly 30.0s to get a measured 40.0g of coffee. Adjust one single thing (19.5g coffee for instance) and leave the rest untouched. Does it get watery? Stronger? More acidic? Will it take 27.3s to get 40.0g? How does it taste if you get only 35.0g of coffee?
Also for the very beginning try the so called "salami shot": Start your normal Espresso shot, but change the glass every 5 seconds. Then take a small sip from the first glass, the second and so on until you are at the last glass (should be 5-6 in total more or less). What do you taste? Acid on the first and bitterness on the last? Inbetween? If you combine all, is it "rounder" in your mouth?

Happy experimenting! :)
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
I wrote about an afternoon spent with the Flair 58 and Niche Zero. The pics were taken with medium format too…lol


and agree with nalye that grinder is most important. Next repeatability, achieved by measuring everything with a 0.1 gram accurate scale, a stopwatch of some kind, some distribution tools and lots of experimenting. Don’t forget too that different beans at different roast and rest levels will behave different. So many variables. So much fun. Lol.

I opted now for a Flair signature and am very curious about the experience. It reflects my way of photography nicely: mostly manual, no frills. All what is needed is a good grinder (in my case a manual one, naturally), good coffee, and a kettle.
 
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dave.gt

Well-known member
Peter,
Wow! Your articles are amazing! (y)(y)(y)

Thank you for sharing, I think I shall be watching your website closely from now on! I swear I could smell the espresso while watching the video.:p
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Back to basics for me. After ruining a roll of film images, using my old 120 steel reel someone gave me and I didn’t notice the mis-alignment), I am taking a short break from developing. Instead, I am going to shoot a lot and let my backlog build up!

The weather has been sublime. Frosty mornings, wood fire in the hearth, light breakfast and coffee as the Sun rises. I decided to get back to basics to match the times. That means enjoying the moment. It also means returning to my old favorite: Colombian coffee.

it has been a long time and my first cup this morning has been amazing as the aroma, taste and after-taste brought me back to center. Good memories and enjoying a favorite coffee are great and wonderful for getting the day started.:)

Getting back to basics also means setting the trivial things aside temporarily to tend to serious family issues like heart surgery; broken family and empty Christmas stockings for grandsons; and the usual stresses of Life for everyone. I am grateful to be healthy enough to provide at least some care and help for them. Another reason to get back to basics:

A good cup of coffee helps me keep my perspective.

Besides, I can always develop later, or send my film out to be developed… but shooting… that is all up to me and the moments are fleeting. I think I can squeeze in a few minutes here and there amidst all the angst just to keep things in balance.:) …camera therapy…:)

Time to order some more 120 black and white film!!!

I hope everyone enjoys the holidays and has time to at least shoot a little film! It is refreshing!:):):)
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I recommend an Ars-Imago Lab Box. Heck with loading in the darkroom or changing bag ... do it all on the kitchen counter in the light. I've been processing all my film with one of these (and their Agfa predecessors, the Rondix 35, Rondinax 35, and Rondinax 60) for years now. Very reliable loading, easy to clean up afterwards too. It is available with 35mm or 35mm and 120 film modules (get the latter...).

I gave you the link to the Lab Box on B&H, but you can get it from a few other sources as well. The Agfa Rondinax 60 can be found on Ebay for a little less money but are a bit harder to find, and most of them seem to be in Europe or the United Kingdom; shipping is costly.

G
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
I recommend an Ars-Imago Lab Box. Heck with loading in the darkroom or changing bag ... do it all on the kitchen counter in the light. I've been processing all my film with one of these (and their Agfa predecessors, the Rondix 35, Rondinax 35, and Rondinax 60) for years now. Very reliable loading, easy to clean up afterwards too. It is available with 35mm or 35mm and 120 film modules (get the latter...).

I gave you the link to the Lab Box on B&H, but you can get it from a few other sources as well. The Agfa Rondinax 60 can be found on Ebay for a little less money but are a bit harder to find, and most of them seem to be in Europe or the United Kingdom; shipping is costly.

G
Wow,

I would love to see a video of the Lab-Box in use!

For a number of years I have used the Photoflex Changing Room Portable Darkroom. And Hewes steel reels with never a problem!

But that old 120 off brand steel reel was a disaster.

BH has a Hewes reel but the Lab-Box sure looks interesting!!! Thanks for sharing, Godfrey!:)
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Wow,
I would love to see a video of the Lab-Box in use!
For a number of years I have used the Photoflex Changing Room Portable Darkroom. And Hewes steel reels with never a problem!
But that old 120 off brand steel reel was a disaster.
BH has a Hewes reel but the Lab-Box sure looks interesting!!! Thanks for sharing, Godfrey!:)
I loaded up my Fuji GS645S Wide 60 today, so lets see how long it takes me to make 15 exposures with it. Once that's exposed, I'll video loading the Lab Box. :)

G
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Ach. I somehow misloaded the GS645 and the backing paper didn't wind tightly onto the take-up spool. I'm sure at least the edges are funky, and should process it in a standard tank to minimize more light leakage. So my video of the Lab Box loading is going to have to wait for the next roll of 120. Sorry...

G
 

MartinN

Active member
I wasted many 120 by doing self E6 and not strictly having a professional setup this summer, and I learned that E6 is not for my bathroom. But at least I learned something. Thats important.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I loaded the GS645 roll into my ancient Kodacraft 120/620 "lasagna" style processing tank in a changing bag and processed it in my usual semi-haphazard way. And I'm pleased to say that while there are certainly some burned edges on the roll, there are some decent looking negative to work with. So ... far from a total loss.

The mis-load was that I didn't push the leading head of the paper backing far enough into the spool so it jammed the roll coming on upwards, creating a 1/8" bump in the roll as it wound onto the spool at the end. Just enough to bleed a little light at the edges but not enough to cause too serious a problem.

fun, fun, fun!

G
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Cold weather (and the holiday season) is here!

I think I am in a good place. With a ton of MF digital images to process and new 120 film, and Rodinal, being delivered this week, I can’t wait for the long cold winter evenings. A warm fire, a cup of Lavazza Gran Selezione, and I am set except for scanning. (Still have to send 120 negatives out to my buddy’s photo shop.)

I scan all my 135 negatives, though.

It took awhile for me to find the right coffee and for now, Lavazza (Keurig) in the morning (maybe evening as well) and Illy Classico for a Moka in the afternoon.
 

MartinN

Active member
Cold weather (and the holiday season) is here!

I think I am in a good place. With a ton of MF digital images to process and new 120 film, and Rodinal, being delivered this week, I can’t wait for the long cold winter evenings. A warm fire, a cup of Lavazza Gran Selezione, and I am set except for scanning. (Still have to send 120 negatives out to my buddy’s photo shop.)

I scan all my 135 negatives, though.

It took awhile for me to find the right coffee and for now, Lavazza (Keurig) in the morning (maybe evening as well) and Illy Classico for a Moka in the afternoon.
Yesterday I scanned two 35mm films, 72 frames at 4000ppi auto everything. I timed 4h 30min. That was as fast as my Plustek Opticfilm 120 was able to work. But I am not so satisfied with all the grain (Fuji Superia 200) compared to 120 chromes. I used Vuescan, because it is faster than Silverfast. I think I must go back to 120. ISO 200 is useful, though, in October and November.
 

MartinN

Active member
In scanning you need time, so coffee can be a good mood keeper. I just like the IR dust cleaning on color films, it is so convenient.
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
After too many months, my Medium Format camera is returning today. I've been roasting coffee for the past 3 weeks or so. The worst part of the learning curve has now been made easier, and drinkable to even good coffee is the result. Best of all, and in fact essential, is that this roaster doesn't smoke - even with dark roasts.

You know how good advice to beginners is never followed, but after 10 years of experience, you realize how important that good advice would have been? I'm trying to actually do it. I have 10 pounds of a single Guatemalan coffee, and I'm going to roast it in every possible way to observe the differences. Now if only I would keep a log book.... :LOL:. Of course, I have 30 pounds of assorted fancy coffees that I have to not touch in the meantime (green coffee beans can last years unroasted).

Pictures to follow when the S returns (assuming it works).
 
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