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Professor Grayson ad-libs an explanation of tilt and shift

TimoK

Active member
Thank You! It was very enlightening video. It takes much work to explain complicated things simply.
And this was enough things to think. People can not learn the whole world in one lesson!

Now try explaining to people why the dust on their sensor is reversed up/down from the test image, but NOT left/right.
--Matt
That's the question. It took a while before I understood why it happens so.
 

dchew

Well-known member
Hi Matt,
Wonderful video. Relaxed, educational and entertaining. I just finished the next article that covers movements. Should publish in a few weeks. I wish I kept it simple but alas, I made it into partial differential equations.

Regardless, I like to think all efforts to explain this stuff is good for us all.

Ciao,
Dave
 

rdeloe

Well-known member
Regardless, I like to think all efforts to explain this stuff is good for us all.
Absolutely.

This reminds me of the work anthropologists do to record speakers of languages that are dying out. We have to document the mysteries of movements before the last practitioner dies. ;)

We're not quite there yet because there's still a healthy market for tilt-shift lenses. Nonetheless, most photographers don't know what they don't know when it comes to movements.
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Hi Matt,
Wonderful video. Relaxed, educational and entertaining. I just finished the next article that covers movements. Should publish in a few weeks. I wish I kept it simple but alas, I made it into partial differential equations.

Regardless, I like to think all efforts to explain this stuff is good for us all.

Ciao,
Dave
Thank you, Dave. I'm looking forward to more of your articles. They're what gave me the courage to post the link to Complicated Things!

Fortunately, I had my fill of "higher mathematics" in my first life. Now, I try to keep everything at the High School level. I'm particularly delighted by hard plane geometry problems that become obvious when lifted to three dimensions.
Scheimpflug:


Scheimpflug in 3D


In the 3D version, the three lines - film, lens, focus - are the intersections of planes, and three planes intersect at a point. QED. Sure, you have to check that the figure DOES lift correctly, but that isn't hard.

You can, of course, calculate the intersections, but that's work!

Matt
 
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vjbelle

Well-known member
Thoroughly enjoyed your presentation. You didn't talk down to or above the viewer but to the viewer. That, to me, is the art of good presentation. Look forward to other segments.

Victor B.
 

GrahamWelland

Subscriber & Workshop Member
Nice video Matt!

I was hoping that you were going to have spend an hour at the end covering front vs rear tilt/swings and their effect on the focal plane (front) and also perspective control (rear) for all those fun tiny rock / plant looming within an image etc. Well, that and HOW to focus using front or rear tilt too :)

I approve of the plaid too btw!
 

Abstraction

Active member
Nice video Matt!

I was hoping that you were going to have spend an hour at the end covering front vs rear tilt/swings and their effect on the focal plane (front) and also perspective control (rear) for all those fun tiny rock / plant looming within an image etc. Well, that and HOW to focus using front or rear tilt too :)

I approve of the plaid too btw!
I think he ran out of paper.
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Nice video Matt!

I was hoping that you were going to have spend an hour at the end covering front vs rear tilt/swings and their effect on the focal plane (front) and also perspective control (rear) for all those fun tiny rock / plant looming within an image etc. Well, that and HOW to focus using front or rear tilt too :)
...
Graham,
The goal is to ATTRACT viewers, not to kill them. 😇 As for HOW to focus, I thought iteration combined with cursing was the accepted practice. :ROFLMAO:

I think he ran out of paper.
You noticed the ultra modern high tech presentation medium! :cool:

And a huge thank you to everyone who has said such nice things about the video. (And to the ones who hated it, but have chosen to stay silent.)

Matt
 
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Geoff

Well-known member
Enjoyed the video - the parts on shift seemed a bit more in detail than that on tilt (which is much harder). Your explanation of tilt with the two sensor planes was brilliant! Oh one wants so much more - clarity on base vs. axis tilts, front vs. rear, or even those diagrams above!
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Enjoyed the video - the parts on shift seemed a bit more in detail than that on tilt (which is much harder). Your explanation of tilt with the two sensor planes was brilliant! Oh one wants so much more - clarity on base vs. axis tilts, front vs. rear, or even those diagrams above!
Thank you, Geoff. I'm glad you enjoyed it and would like more.
As you could tell, the video was meant for people who may have heard of tilt and shift, but had never really used it. That included my brilliant host.

M
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Great job Matt at simplifying something that is almost impossible to dumb down to my level. Love the dynamics between you and your brother-in-law!
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Great job Matt at simplifying something that is almost impossible to dumb down to my level. Love the dynamics between you and your brother-in-law!
"Impossible Simplification" goes on my next business card.

And Mark is so much fun to be around!

Today is “Teacher Appreciation Day”.:):):)

Thanks, Matt!!!!! You are sooooo appreciated!😎😎😎
Thank you so much!

Matt
 

vieri

Well-known member
I was recently a guest on Complicated Things. If you want to see WHY tilt works without resorting to math, you might find it amusing. If you want to roast me for the inaccuracies (there are many), feel free. Pretending you didn't see this post is probably best.

M
That was very entertaining and educational at the same time, thanks for putting it together, Matt!!

Best regards,

Vieri
 
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