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Ther versatility or PITA of a Medium Format Camera as a travel camera

ndwgolf

Active member
When I started to use my S-system I used it for all kinds including family, travel etc.
What I usually do is bring maybe 4 lenses on the trip but only 2 max. 3 on a hike, so some lenses stay in the room. I think one of the big good things about the S is that it is not that much bigger than a DSLR. The x1d is even better (in regards of size). I dont know if I wanted to schlepp around a big Hassy or phase.

With the L-mount cameras I sometimes prefer the flexibility of the zooms - for example the 16-35 or the 24-90 or the Telezoom, and also the SL primes are exceptional. I feel the IQ gap is not as big as it was 6 years ago.

Lately I have used the S more often again. I do not only like the IQ but also the solid feel , simple user interface and optical viewfinder.
I also have the S007 with 4 lenses but I am trying to sell that gear as the IQ of the H6D100c is just so much better. I will take my H6D100c 50, 100 and 150mm and leave the 300mm at home
Neil
 

Paratom

Well-known member
I also have the S007 with 4 lenses but I am trying to sell that gear as the IQ of the H6D100c is just so much better. I will take my H6D100c 50, 100 and 150mm and leave the 300mm at home
Neil
What I also believe: For non pros it is really also important that we feel "good" with the gear we bring, that we enjoy using it, that we feel we can do what we like to do.
If-for example-you feel the H6d IQ is the one which satisfies you (and the S not), and if you feel its fine for you to schlepp it round, thats all that counts for you.

Of course my CL is lighter than my SL+16-35, but if I feel I have more fun with the SL than I bring the SL and accept the weight. The same for other cameras. As long as we are not doing really extreme hikes one can carry a lot if one wants to.
If I can carry my paraglider in a backpack with 15kg of gear up a mountain than I can certainly also carry my MF gear on a trip.
I think a good backpack and a wise selection/reduction of lenses helps to avoid the Sherpa-feeling.
 

bab

Member
That's a nice looking case. What is it?

On the hiking bag front, my F-stop Loka doesn't fit me as well as I'd like. I'm looking at the Atlas Athlete. See, https://atlaspacks.com/

This is turning into a dangerous thread among everyone here with First World Problems....

ken
I’ve been using the Atlas pack for two years it’s a great bag. I can fit my lenses in vertically in the adventure pack because it’s over 9” deep. I also fit the H6D100-C on its side with a 100mm lens so the batter grip is facing up making it easy to QuickDraw the camera and lens out of the bag. A RRS pano rig fits perfectly on top in the drawstring area. If you want not to carry but to pack you can manage 5 lenses, camera, wine country 150mm filter system, big tripod, water, light meter, filters, lenses focusing hood, external monitor, etc very comfortably. For the last 5 years I use this solution, I pack three lenses with camera but I transfer two lenses to my waist belt, that reduces the weight when walking around and give access without going into the bag I have found no better way to work. These days when I go to shoot I plan better so I know what lenses I will use the most the rest stays in the car. If I travel the same applies I bring the kit but only take for the day what I know I’ll use.
A bigger issue for me which has not happened yet is not taking a backup body in case the H6D craps out.

And I wouldn’t feel right without mentioning this....Has the H6D seen the end of its life-cycle?
 

algrove

Well-known member
Many good comments here.

My take-after my XF system with 5 lenses in an f-stop backpack got to 40-45 lbs I knew that was too much. That weight is without tripod+head.

So I got an Alpa system for my IQ3100 at the time with 3 lenses and the weight dropped to about 10-15 lbs in backpack.

I also got the Fuji 50R and all the GF lenses for AF needs. I do not carry more than the 23 (if landscape), 32-64, 100-200 plus 1.4x and occasionally the 250, but always the 50mm now which streetable.

I use the roller TT bag Airport International V3.0, but it's not suitable for small planes.

In order to force me to pack light I now use the Mindshift 26L. It holds the STC/IQ4150 and 5 lenses plus Q2 and 8-10 Phase batteries, etc. It can fit under Airbus and Boeing seats.

I liked the 26L so much that I bought the 36L for local car journeys.
 

danlindberg

Well-known member
Great times to be a travelling photographer if you consider image quality and portability. In my small Manfrotto backpack I can pack: X1D body + XCD 21 + XCD 45 + XCD 90 + ProFoto A1 + remote trigger + charger for both cam and flash + spare battery camera + several SD cards + 2x ND filters + Macbook 13". When standing at the gate no questions needs to be answered, this complete backpack is approx 38 x 34 x 18 cm and weighs under 6 kg!
Then for walking/trekking when taking out the Macbook and chargers I am at 4 kg. If I don't need the flash...well, then even less weight. Amazing considering the image quality.

 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
I’ve been using the Atlas pack for two years it’s a great bag. I can fit my lenses in vertically in the adventure pack because it’s over 9” deep. I also fit the H6D100-C on its side with a 100mm lens so the batter grip is facing up making it easy to QuickDraw the camera and lens out of the bag. A RRS pano rig fits perfectly on top in the drawstring area. If you want not to carry but to pack you can manage 5 lenses, camera, wine country 150mm filter system, big tripod, water, light meter, filters, lenses focusing hood, external monitor, etc very comfortably. For the last 5 years I use this solution, I pack three lenses with camera but I transfer two lenses to my waist belt, that reduces the weight when walking around and give access without going into the bag I have found no better way to work. These days when I go to shoot I plan better so I know what lenses I will use the most the rest stays in the car. If I travel the same applies I bring the kit but only take for the day what I know I’ll use.
A bigger issue for me which has not happened yet is not taking a backup body in case the H6D craps out.

And I wouldn’t feel right without mentioning this....Has the H6D seen the end of its life-cycle?
Despite my collection of f-stop packs and ICUs, I gave the Atlas Athlete a try. The end result is like a Loka with large, shallow ICU, but the thing is a) put together beautifully and b) has interchangeable waist belts. The heavy duty belt is MUCH more comfortable than the one that ordinarily comes with the Athlete, so I have a really comfy rig for a GFX100, 23, 50, 100-200, and any guest lens that wants to come along. Aside from the waist belt, the design keeps the load very close to your back. The deeper ICUs (and the Atlas Adventure) allow more depth, especially the camera body taking up a lot less space, but that pushes the load back, and is harder on the back and shoulders.

For the "silly photographer look" while walking (but it works well), I have the 100-200 (or 250) permanently on a BlackRapid, and the 23 on a ThinkTank lens pouch on the belt. That leaves the pack for less frequently used optics.

Matt
 

kdphotography

Well-known member
I don't know whether to thank you or curse at you, Matt. :rolleyes: :D

But you've confirmed why the Atlas Athlete remains on my short list.

:thumbup:

Ken
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
I don't know whether to thank you or curse at you, Matt. :rolleyes: :D

But you've confirmed why the Atlas Athlete remains on my short list.

:thumbup:

Ken
Ken,

You do lose the flexibility of shallow vs. deep ICU's. The depth on the Athlete is shallow enough that a Canon 1Dx, Nikon D5, or Fuji GFX100 won't fit in vertically, and so the body takes up a lot of real estate. That can be an advantage, especially if none of your gear is over 5" tall/thick. Of course, one could throw something in the top/outer compartment - I just haven't needed to yet.

The Adventure is a much heavier pack, and is for people with stronger knees than mine - mostly because you'd feel silly taking a body and two lenses out in it, so it requires 5 lenses and a Gitzo Giant to look balanced. I believe it has "Graham Welland Edition" embroidered on it. :ROTFL:

I'm quite happy with the RRS TFC-14, and a kit that doesn't make me feel like I'm on the Great Pyramid construction crew.

Matt
 

borzamircea

New member
What is this bag Mexecutioner?
Hi Mexecutioner! Can the bag fit the XF in the configuration shown in the picture, but with the prism VF instead of the WLF. What I mean, is there enough height, to close the lid with the prism VF attached. Thanks!
 

Mexecutioner

Active member
Hi Mexecutioner! Can the bag fit the XF in the configuration shown in the picture, but with the prism VF instead of the WLF. What I mean, is there enough height, to close the lid with the prism VF attached. Thanks!
Yes, plenty of height for it to close with the prism attached. It is 7.5"deep. The XF is 5.5"at the highest point of the prism.

Rodrigo

IMG_6267.jpgIMG_6179.jpg
 

Mexecutioner

Active member
Thanks Rodrigo! Appreciate your insights. I love that the case is so erll padded and has those extra thick pads. Will most likely go check it out at the local camera store ( I checked if they have it after asking you). Cheers!

Mircea
You will be surprised at how sturdy it is while still being light.
 

ndwgolf

Active member
Great times to be a travelling photographer if you consider image quality and portability. In my small Manfrotto backpack I can pack: X1D body + XCD 21 + XCD 45 + XCD 90 + ProFoto A1 + remote trigger + charger for both cam and flash + spare battery camera + several SD cards + 2x ND filters + Macbook 13". When standing at the gate no questions needs to be answered, this complete backpack is approx 38 x 34 x 18 cm and weighs under 6 kg!
Then for walking/trekking when taking out the Macbook and chargers I am at 4 kg. If I don't need the flash...well, then even less weight. Amazing considering the image quality.

I like the look of that.....just need to find myself a X1D and a few lenses and im sorted
Neil
 
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