Site Sponsors
Results 1 to 37 of 37

Thread: Are two card slots really important?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    938
    Post Thanks / Like

    Are two card slots really important?

    This question has been debated before with some suggesting no pro would shoot without two cards. I can understand the peace of mind it brings, but with the new Sony A7III's, I've read that the camera locks up if one card fails, so the camera is useless regardless of having two slots. I also think that CF cards are becoming more obsolete now with XQD and high capacity SD. Pins in camera for CF seem prone to damage too. I've been shooting with a Nikon D810 because I love the OVF, but have been thinking about my once owned Sony A7RII after going over a few ski photos. That camera was amazingly light with almost MFD quality and can now be purchased brand new for the price of an Fuji XT3. So, I'm curious about other experiences with CF, SD or XQD. There's considerable feedback from photographers in favor of two, so why did Nikon's Z leave them out when it's certain a new model will have two? Are two cards just marketing hype or camera makers known practice (Leica) of leaving out useful features only to be used in the next iteration of cameras?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdphoto View Post
    Are two cards just marketing hype or camera makers known practice (Leica) of leaving out useful features only to be used in the next iteration of cameras?
    If two card slots are better, are three card slots better yet? I mean you could lose everything if you had two bad cards.
    Last edited by faberryman; 10th December 2018 at 06:21.

  3. #3
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    pegelli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    3,230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdphoto View Post
    .... but with the new Sony A7III's, I've read that the camera locks up if one card fails, so the camera is useless regardless of having two slots.
    I think two card slots (and writing all files to both cards) is an insurance against a card failure that is not noticed during shooting. So in case the camera with one cardslot stops functioning when its SD card is malfuntioning is not the bigest problem, just change camera or card and you're back in business.

    Coming home in your studio and then finding a whole card of a wedding shoot with one card (or other expensive/critical job) is corrupted and not recoverable is the thing you want to avoid at all cost, for which the probability goes down when using two cards/two slots (but even with two cards/slots the probability of this happening is not zero).
    My Pics
    Thanks 1 Member(s) thanked for this post
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  4. #4
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    k-hawinkler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    The "Land of Enchantment"
    Posts
    4,481
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    If they bother to put in two slots, I would prefer if both of them were of equal high speed. If using the slow card slot in addition to the faster one, slows down the faster one, then I tend to only use the faster one, e.g. in the Sony A9.

    That’s an issue for birding and fast sports action. But I don’t think wedding photographers would worry about that. In any case it pays during shooting to pay attention to card issues as well. So, to have two slots is better than 1, or 3 or 4... generally speaking, I assume, if shooting unique time-dependent events.
    With best regards, K-H.
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  5. #5
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,783
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    3

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Yes from my experience

  6. #6
    Vivek
    Guest

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    A build in giga byte storage plus a card slot.

    Now, that is even better!

    (ANYTHING that will bring down the prices of an earlier generation camera is fine by me! )

  7. #7
    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Pratamnak
    Posts
    10,709
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2502

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    I have two cameras with twin card slots; the Olympus 7070 and the Fuji S3. They both feature one CF slot and one XD slot. They had two slots because they wanted to promote the now defunct XD card standard but understood that they wouldn't sell many cameras if they didn't include the more mainstream CF slot as well.

    I've had one - 1 - card fail on me. It was easily corrected with some software that I downloaded from the internet. I don't remember when that was, but my Mac was running OS 9. I always carry at least two cameras plus backup cards. I also carry a pair of spare glasses. While i have needed the spare glasses on occasions, I've never needed a backup card except when I shot motor sports regularly and a card ran out of space.

    I've had many cameras fail on me for different reasons. Card problems has so far not been one of them.

  8. #8
    Senior Member DougDolde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Joshua Tree, CA
    Posts
    836
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Not for me though the D850 has two. I don't use the QXD slot

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    938
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    With more higher paying photography gigs, I just think that it's imperative to have two now. If I was just shooting landscapes off by myself, no big deal, but sometimes the extra card is peace of mind when shooting big jobs. I once shot a big wedding with a Sony A7RII and used a portable HD to dump photographs on every few hours. It was really slow and sometimes more aggravating because you had to wait to get to the studio with fingers crossed that there's something to edit.

  10. #10
    Senior Member bab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdphoto View Post
    With more higher paying photography gigs, I just think that it's imperative to have two now. If I was just shooting landscapes off by myself, no big deal, but sometimes the extra card is peace of mind when shooting big jobs. I once shot a big wedding with a Sony A7RII and used a portable HD to dump photographs on every few hours. It was really slow and sometimes more aggravating because you had to wait to get to the studio with fingers crossed that there's something to edit.
    If you have one slot you better have two bodies, if you came to shoot my wedding with one body and one slot I’d be nervous, if there was two photographers and four bodies I’d be calm and I think that goes for most people. That being said I don’t understand the debate! It’s pointless. The job requires back up period!

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    938
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by bab View Post
    If you have one slot you better have two bodies, if you came to shoot my wedding with one body and one slot I’d be nervous, if there was two photographers and four bodies I’d be calm and I think that goes for most people. That being said I don’t understand the debate! It’s pointless. The job requires back up period!
    You might have hard time convincing those who just purchased the new flagship mirrorless cameras from Nikon and Canon that only have one slot.
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  12. #12
    Subscriber Member Jorgen Udvang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Pratamnak
    Posts
    10,709
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2502

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by bab View Post
    If you have one slot you better have two bodies, if you came to shoot my wedding with one body and one slot I’d be nervous, if there was two photographers and four bodies I’d be calm and I think that goes for most people. That being said I don’t understand the debate! It’s pointless. The job requires back up period!
    Arriving at any paid job with less than two bodies is unprofessional, period. Any camera can fail and will do so at the most inconvenient moment. When I was shooting professionally, I was carrying two bodies and had a spare in the car.

    In my experience, the chances that a camera body will fail is much bigger than that a card or a card slot will fail. Am I repeating myself? Possibly, and for good reason.

  13. #13
    Senior Member bab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    1

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorgen Udvang View Post
    Arriving at any paid job with less than two bodies is unprofessional, period. Any camera can fail and will do so at the most inconvenient moment. When I was shooting professionally, I was carrying two bodies and had a spare in the car.

    In my experience, the chances that a camera body will fail is much bigger than that a card or a card slot will fail. Am I repeating myself? Possibly, and for good reason.
    Yes but my worst failure was on a trip to the central artic back in the 90s I had the fits digital Canon and a Hasselblad w/ 110mm. The lens turned once to a focus position and froze. You couldn’t turn it left or right! That’s been the only issue I’ve ever had with total failure in 50 years.

  14. #14
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Godfrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near San Jose, California
    Posts
    8,722
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    As others have said, I never went to a paid shoot without a second, identical backup camera body that was tested and known good.

    Regards two card slots, I've had a couple of cameras that had two card slots but never found any need at all for them. In fact, I found in most cases that they simply complicated my post-shoot workflow.

    In the seventeen years of making hundreds of thousands of photos with digital cameras since my photography went primarily digital capture, I've never once had a card failure or a camera failure, or even a lens failure when on a shoot.

    G

  15. #15
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,783
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    3

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    I have had card failures since 2009

  16. #16
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    This topic was beat to death when Nikon and Canon introduced their new mirrorless cameras . A lot depends on what and how you are shooting .

    If you are a wedding photographer or any situation where you could not repeat the shoot..then yes you would want dual cards and should be recording raw captures to both . No other approach provides the same level of security .

    HOWEVER .....for most photography it is an over rated feature . Because :

    1. The new XQD cards and even some of the “tough” SD cards are far more reliable than our experiences of only a few years ago.

    2. Using two cards often slows the camera to the slowest cards speed . You can get around this by shooting raw to the fast card and jpeg to the slower card .

    3. Up to 170K in my LR catalog and have never lost a single image due to card failure . I have had cards go bad and have to use recovery software to get the files ...but I always retrieved them . LEXAR CF cards have been the worst and its almost always a situation where the camera is trying to write files faster than the card (Nikon D4S) ..its called an incomplete write and it screws up the folder . I have had a few LEXAR SD cards go bad but never had to recovery files . This was almost always do to mishandling them (when you see a dent in the card you know OPS ...I did it .)

    Pretty much everything I shoot can t be easily repeated (mostly Street Shooting and Family ). I use two identical bodies for every important shoot and select lenses than could be overlapped . My standard operating procedure would be to (1) reformat the SD cards with SD Formatter ..then format again in the camera . (2) download all files daily to my MBP and back up (3) start every shoot with a fully charged battery .

    This process allows me to catch any issues as early as possible . Most issues are self inflicted technique blunders . Low battery is a problem waiting to happen .

    If I was still shooting weddings ..I would be using two shooters ,each with two bodies and each body with two card slots .

    There is a debate on using cards as backup and not switching out a working card . Since cards normally fault due to handling issues ...when you have a reliable card ..maybe you should keep using it . If you have the capacity ...most cameras will start a new folder after you have downloaded your files . So day one would be a folder and day two a new folder . I haven t done this but it seems to have merit .

    Final thought ....I shoot primarily (80%) with two M10 bodies each with one slot and never a problem ..ever .
    Roger Dunham
    http://rogerdunham.com/
    Likes 2 Member(s) liked this post

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    938
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Many use a card reader, so handling is a must unless your camera is connected to a computer. For me, that's not always convenient. It's not just weddings that require b/u. it's anything that you value as a photographer. For me, it could be changing light, an expression or simply a flick of the hair during a portrait shoot. I've done shoots with professional skiers going down 60 degree pitches in two feet of snow. I did one showcasing a skier against a panorama for a popular Winter clothing company. I can't switch cameras very easily in those situations if an SD card is corrupt. Nor do I want to carry the extra weight. Does Nikon, Canon or Leica assume a professional will just buy two identical cameras because of only one card slot? I hope not, especially with Leica! The popular method of holding SD cards in place for most cameras is the spring loaded "push to click in/push to remove." The spring in the camera can sometimes be the cause of not reading properly and not the SD card at all, so what then? If one is just starting out as a photography business, sometimes only one camera is the only option considering lenses, lights and expendables. So, for me, any camera with only one slot is not a professional tool. (yes, I love the Sony A7RII, but won't buy the A7RIII) but there's no good reason to leave them out. Yeah, I'm taking to you Nikon and Canon! Shooting film requires much less investment for b/u too. Digital has mucked all this up I also don't care how "tough" XQD or SD cards are either. So, I guess I answered my own question. Yes, two card slots are important because it's better to have it and not need it, then to need it and not have it.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    As a matter of historical interest, what was the first digital camera to have two card slots, and how did professionals cope before its introduction?
    Last edited by faberryman; 14th December 2018 at 06:52.

  19. #19
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Godfrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near San Jose, California
    Posts
    8,722
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdphoto View Post
    Many use a card reader, so handling is a must unless your camera is connected to a computer. For me, that's not always convenient. It's not just weddings that require b/u. it's anything that you value as a photographer. For me, it could be changing light, an expression or simply a flick of the hair during a portrait shoot. I've done shoots with professional skiers going down 60 degree pitches in two feet of snow. I did one showcasing a skier against a panorama for a popular Winter clothing company. I can't switch cameras very easily in those situations if an SD card is corrupt. Nor do I want to carry the extra weight. Does Nikon, Canon or Leica assume a professional will just buy two identical cameras because of only one card slot? I hope not, especially with Leica! The popular method of holding SD cards in place for most cameras is the spring loaded "push to click in/push to remove." The spring in the camera can sometimes be the cause of not reading properly and not the SD card at all, so what then? If one is just starting out as a photography business, sometimes only one camera is the only option considering lenses, lights and expendables. So, for me, any camera with only one slot is not a professional tool. (yes, I love the Sony A7RII, but won't buy the A7RIII) but there's no good reason to leave them out. Yeah, I'm taking to you Nikon and Canon! Shooting film requires much less investment for b/u too. Digital has mucked all this up I also don't care how "tough" XQD or SD cards are either. So, I guess I answered my own question. Yes, two card slots are important because it's better to have it and not need it, then to need it and not have it.
    (bolded) For sure, because there is no way at all to back up film exposures. It's much less expensive to consider back up when there are exactly no options whatever. I've had orders of magnitude more issues with film camera malfunctions than with any digital capture equipment.

    Seems to me that you had already decided what was important to you before you asked the question. So what was the point of asking the question?

    G

  20. #20
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Don Libby's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    32° 31' 37.06" N, 111° 6' 0.9" W
    Posts
    4,561
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Yes
    Don Libby
    Iron Creek Photography
    Blog
    Tucson AZ
    Likes 3 Member(s) liked this post

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    938
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Libby View Post
    Yes
    Simple and to the point...
    P.S. Great photography on your site too!
    Thanks 1 Member(s) thanked for this post

  22. #22
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdphoto View Post
    Many use a card reader, so handling is a must unless your camera is connected to a computer. For me, that's not always convenient. It's not just weddings that require b/u. it's anything that you value as a photographer. For me, it could be changing light, an expression or simply a flick of the hair during a portrait shoot. I've done shoots with professional skiers going down 60 degree pitches in two feet of snow. I did one showcasing a skier against a panorama for a popular Winter clothing company. I can't switch cameras very easily in those situations if an SD card is corrupt. Nor do I want to carry the extra weight. Does Nikon, Canon or Leica assume a professional will just buy two identical cameras because of only one card slot? I hope not, especially with Leica! The popular method of holding SD cards in place for most cameras is the spring loaded "push to click in/push to remove." The spring in the camera can sometimes be the cause of not reading properly and not the SD card at all, so what then? If one is just starting out as a photography business, sometimes only one camera is the only option considering lenses, lights and expendables. So, for me, any camera with only one slot is not a professional tool. (yes, I love the Sony A7RII, but won't buy the A7RIII) but there's no good reason to leave them out. Yeah, I'm taking to you Nikon and Canon! Shooting film requires much less investment for b/u too. Digital has mucked all this up I also don't care how "tough" XQD or SD cards are either. So, I guess I answered my own question. Yes, two card slots are important because it's better to have it and not need it, then to need it and not have it.
    Everyone that shoots extensively has missed those great once in a blue moon opportunities . You have a 1000x more likely you will miss the peak action on the downhill skier ...than have a card failure . When I am not doing street photography ...I am shooting sports . Polo is the most challenging because you only get so many attacks on the goal and you have to guess when and where ..the establish focus on the eyes of the horse and hope that 10FPS is enough . Do I need to mention how critical AF “target acquisition “ and “tracking “ are to capturing a moment in sports ?

    The risk of card failure is incredibly small and essentially irrelevant in the discussion of getting the once in a lifetime ,not to be repeated photo .

    I track very carefully my hits and misses and I am constantly amazed at the consistency of my errors ...did I nail the focus point , did I catch the best moment , did I clip a body part , are the edges clean ..hows the composition , what about the context providing 2nd and 3rd tier elements ,did I stop enough movement ,hows the depth of field ,did I preserve adequate dynamic range and sharpness.

    How much time do you spend practicing to avoid your demons that eliminate 1000 s of opportunities ?

    The point about tough cards is simple .....lets say CF cards fail once every 1000 uses , Sd cards less so once every 2000, the new XQD adds fail once ever 10000 uses . Should be obvious . Now look at the equipment itself ..failure rates are way way more likely ..which is why most commissioned sports photographer have three not two cameras with them and redundant lenses .

    Read up what diglloyd says about two cards ...a reviewer that gripes about virtually everything . He uses one card in cameras with two slots .

    So in summary ...

    ....Of course two slots are better than a single slot .

    ...XQD is way better than CF or SD for reliability . This materially affects the potential for card failure .

    ...The photographers craft skills are the weakest point and account for the majority of the missed opportunities or LOST PICTURES.

    .....Equipment failure (bodies and lenses ) is many times more likely than a card failure .

    Two card slots are certainly a desirable feature and I want them whenever I can find a way but the insurance they provide is way way over rated .
    Roger Dunham
    http://rogerdunham.com/
    Thanks 1 Member(s) thanked for this post
    Likes 3 Member(s) liked this post

  23. #23
    Senior Member Elderly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    469
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Putting the skills of the photographer aside - something can always go wrong (but rarely does).

    Back in the day (film) when I worked as a pro, in the fields I worked in, almost nothing
    could be re-shot if something had gone wrong.

    I was paid to get a result and anything, and everything that I could do to ensure success
    was employed - so yes if I were working today; two card slots would be essential to help me by offering a LITTLE peace of mind.

    But sometimes things can be completely out of your control:
    The amount of back-up I put together in order not to miss the shot below (taken some 33 years ago)
    was something to behold ……… however - what I couldn't have bargained for was the fact that the person
    at the other end of the radio failed to transmit to me the countdown to the truck being fired from the air-cannon .

    The first thing I knew was seeing the truck in the air , but luckily I did capture the moment.

    Ian.
    Likes 4 Member(s) liked this post

  24. #24
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Godfrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Near San Jose, California
    Posts
    8,722
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    ... Oops!

    Great shot, glad you got it!

    G
    Godfrey - GDGPhoto Flickr Stream
    Thanks 1 Member(s) thanked for this post

  25. #25
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elderly View Post
    Putting the skills of the photographer aside - something can always go wrong (but rarely does).

    Back in the day (film) when I worked as a pro, in the fields I worked in, almost nothing
    could be re-shot if something had gone wrong.

    I was paid to get a result and anything, and everything that I could do to ensure success
    was employed - so yes if I were working today; two card slots would be essential to help me by offering a LITTLE peace of mind.

    But sometimes things can be completely out of your control:
    The amount of back-up I put together in order not to miss the shot below (taken some 33 years ago)
    was something to behold ……… however - what I couldn't have bargained for was the fact that the person
    at the other end of the radio failed to transmit to me the countdown to the truck being fired from the air-cannon .

    The first thing I knew was seeing the truck in the air , but luckily I did capture the moment.

    Come on Ian ....two card slots are not ESSENTIAL . Look at the entire system when determining points where redundancy would improve the likely hood of success. Number One ....how many photographers are being assigned ..its 1000X more likely that you blew it ..than having a card failure . Number Two ....equipment ....100x more likely you would have an equipment failure than a card failure . Number Three ....in the film days I suppose the lab never blew it and ruined a shoot with bad chemicals or over processing .

  26. #26
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    One additional point I might add .....the root cause of many card failures is inadequate battery power . When a battery runs downs and you are shooting a burst ...you may not have adequate power to complete writing the last frame to the card . When you create an incomplete write to a card you can destroy the index to the files it contains . That is why the recovery software can find files that seem to have been lost ..because it reads the card without relying on the index .

    In my case 50% of my card failures were do to corrupt card indexes.

  27. #27
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,783
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    3

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    To the OP's question

    YES

  28. #28
    Senior Member Elderly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    469
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    Come on Ian ....two card slots are not ESSENTIAL . Look at the entire system when determining points where redundancy would improve the likely hood of success. Number One ....how many photographers are being assigned ..its 1000X more likely that you blew it ..than having a card failure . Number Two ....equipment ....100x more likely you would have an equipment failure than a card failure . Number Three ....in the film days I suppose the lab never blew it and ruined a shoot with bad chemicals or over processing .
    I did say a LITTLE peace up mind .....

    "how many photographers are being assigned?" : Just me in that instance, I was the Stills Photographer on that movie.

    "equipment failure" : As far as I remember the only equipment failures I had were due to my own carelessness,
    but I always carried a suitable back-up for everything, however 99.9% of the time it was never needed.

    "I suppose the lab never blew it and ruined a shoot?" : Yes, problems on two or three occasions out of the huge number of times
    that labs processed my film, but I guarded against that extremely remote possibility by always shooting twice the number of sheets/rolls of film needed and holding back from the lab the second sheet/roll until the first had been safely couriered back to me and I had checked it.
    So once again all that paranoia was unnecessary for 99.9% of the jobs, but for the 0.1% .........

    So if I were still working; a camera with twice as many card slots that I needed, would for ME be an essential 0.tiny% part of my back-up arsenal.

    Thinking back - the only piece of equipment that I didn't duplicate when on a shoot somewhere, was a second step ladder .
    Ian.

  29. #29
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elderly View Post
    I did say a LITTLE peace up mind .....

    "how many photographers are being assigned?" : Just me in that instance, I was the Stills Photographer on that movie.

    "equipment failure" : As far as I remember the only equipment failures I had were due to my own carelessness,
    but I always carried a suitable back-up for everything, however 99.9% of the time it was never needed.

    "I suppose the lab never blew it and ruined a shoot?" : Yes, problems on two or three occasions out of the huge number of times
    that labs processed my film, but I guarded against that extremely remote possibility by always shooting twice the number of sheets/rolls of film needed and holding back from the lab the second sheet/roll until the first had been safely couriered back to me and I had checked it.
    So once again all that paranoia was unnecessary for 99.9% of the jobs, but for the 0.1% .........

    So if I were still working; a camera with twice as many card slots that I needed, would for ME be an essential 0.tiny% part of my back-up arsenal.

    Thinking back - the only piece of equipment that I didn't duplicate when on a shoot somewhere, was a second step ladder .
    Sorry Ian its of course your decision .....my only point is that in the larger view of “risk of failure “ a bad card is extremely small . Understanding risk factors is critical to putting your effort, money etc into things that matter . As cards get better and more reliable (XQD verse CF) its questionable the risk of a card failure makes any meaningful difference .

    These are of course personal decisions and its always nice to have redundancy in your system .
    Last edited by glenerrolrd; 16th December 2018 at 09:09.
    Roger Dunham
    http://rogerdunham.com/
    Thanks 1 Member(s) thanked for this post

  30. #30
    Super Duper
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,783
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    3

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post

    ... and its always nice to have redundancy in your system .
    Agree.

  31. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    938
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by glenerrolrd View Post
    One additional point I might add .....the root cause of many card failures is inadequate battery power . When a battery runs downs and you are shooting a burst ...you may not have adequate power to complete writing the last frame to the card . When you create an incomplete write to a card you can destroy the index to the files it contains . That is why the recovery software can find files that seem to have been lost ..because it reads the card without relying on the index .

    In my case 50% of my card failures were do to corrupt card indexes.
    Roger, I think this last sentence from your quote confirms the reason for two slots. Obviously, there's steps one can do to mitigate a potential card failure, charged battery, formatting and compatible cards, etc. But if you can approximate an average for card failures, then you certainly need two slots. I've had 2 Lexar cards that were unusable, but thankfully this wasn't while shooting. There's other factors that can fry a camera card and electronics and that's why I shoot film as a back up too.

  32. #32
    Workshop Member glenerrolrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdphoto View Post
    Roger, I think this last sentence from your quote confirms the reason for two slots. Obviously, there's steps one can do to mitigate a potential card failure, charged battery, formatting and compatible cards, etc. But if you can approximate an average for card failures, then you certainly need two slots. I've had 2 Lexar cards that were unusable, but thankfully this wasn't while shooting. There's other factors that can fry a camera card and electronics and that's why I shoot film as a back up too.
    Ok ...not going to convince anyone here ....I have 170K images in my LR library taken with more than a dozen different cameras AND I HAVE NEVER MISSED An IMPORTANT SHOT OR LOST A FOLDER DUE TO CARD FAILURE . Wish I could say the same about my other points of failure !

    I have had cards go bad ..about a dozen ....mostly CF cards and a few SD cards . In all cases I was not affected while shooting (or I identified it immediately ). 100% recovery was always possible for those frames captured .

    I have on the other hand had numerous blown opportunities due to most likely ME and sometimes EQUIPMENT .

    So my only point is that having dual cards maybe addressing a problem that is insignificant to most photographers. I am not sure that the performance of the XQD cards doesn t make it so unlikely that its no longer relevant .
    Roger Dunham
    http://rogerdunham.com/
    Thanks 1 Member(s) thanked for this post

  33. #33
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Don Libby's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    32° 31' 37.06" N, 111° 6' 0.9" W
    Posts
    4,561
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    Seems to me we're over thinking this.

    Did I pay more for a particular camera because it has more than one slot? Am I forced to use that extra slot when I didn't want it in the first place? Is it causing me sleepless nights worrying about it? Would I have brought the camera if it only had one card slot? What about the type of card the slot(s) use. It's enough to drive a person to drink - actually my truck took me to the bar not the camera.

    I'm a belt and suspenders person. In short, I'd rather have "it" and not need 'it" than to need "it" and not have "it".

    Personally I like the 2-card slot idea as it allows me extra storage. I've been shooting an interesting subject of late and have 2-64GB cards in both the slots. I filled the first card which in turn automatically switched over to the second allowing me to keep shooting without breaking my stride. Yes I could have used a larger card however that question can be asked by someone else "how large a card is too large?".

    In short - or as short as I can be...

    If you have 2-cards and only want to use 1 do so. If you have 2 and want to use 2 be my guest. If you only have 1 and want 2 then you might be SOL unless you want upgrade.

    This is what I get for drinking my dinner Actually now that I think about it - this is what you get for me drinking my dinner

    And to those who might not get "it" this was written partially with my tongue in cheek

    Good night all
    Don Libby
    Iron Creek Photography
    Blog
    Tucson AZ
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

  34. #34
    Senior Member stephengilbert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA
    Posts
    2,385
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    2

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    In short - or as short as I can be...


  35. #35
    Senior Member Tim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Adelaide, SA
    Posts
    1,075
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    I've had one card go bad. Not a total failure of the controller but the flash storage developed "bad blocks". All images but one were recovered. The one was partially (mostly) lost.

    ALL the cards ever made will fail, given enough usage, either the controller chip or the flash storage will cease to work in time. The only question is when... not if. Flash storage "wears" out.

    There are many articles to google - https://havecamerawilltravel.com/pho...ards-wear-out/

    If I were a Pro I would replace my cards regularly even if the cards are working, and thoroughly test the new replacements before putting them to use for client images. Pro-active replacement before failure rather than re-active replacement after failure (and loss of images and job). Consider the cost of a card against a series of payments for jobs done. Not much IMO. Use the working old cards for personal fun.

    Sourcing cards from a reliable supplier is also essential, so many fakes out there. As an example a card may pretend to be 32Gb but if you copy 32Gb to them, you won't get back 32Gb as they have modded the controller to report a fake size. Beware.

    An interesting question would be as to if video recording "works" the card harder. I suspect it does and shortens their lifespan.

    Tim

  36. #36
    Super Duper
    Senior Member
    Shashin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    5,296
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    150

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    I am glad I am given the choice. One card slot is fine until the card fails. I have had a card fail. I like cameras with dual slots, but I also have a cameras with single slots. Would it be a deciding factors in a camera choice, hard to tell until the choice is presented. But my purchase motivations are more complex where the card slots are a nice feature if they are there.

  37. #37
    Subscriber & Workshop Member GrahamWelland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    6,327
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    624

    Re: Are two card slots really important?

    TBH it’s never bothered me. As mentioned by a few other folks, the quality of the cards are more important to me than the number of slots. With the price of cards these days I tend to only use them for a few cycles through the camera before I retire them anyway. I’ll typically mostly fill a card and then replace it and do the same thing - it’ll probably only end up in the camera again after five or six other cards have been used.

    Now if I were shooting commercially, I’d go for smaller cards and make a point of swapping them out more often to limit any potential for loss of lots of images.
    Remember: adventure before dementia!

    The World is a book, and those that do not travel read only one page ...
    Likes 1 Member(s) liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •