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Ageing photographers and the weight. Simplicate and add lightness.

rdeloe

Well-known member
So I looked for a system that would give a satisfying photographic experience and give me the print quality I would be satisfied with. Surprisingly, even for me, I settle on the Fujifilm X series cameras--I was thinking I would go to 35mm. I tested my 24MP X Pro2 on a 40" print, thinking if that was good, anything smaller would be better.
I entered digital seriously with a Sony A7. Like you, I switched down a size to a Fuji X-T2. I made this decision because with APS-C I could use 35mm lenses and a tilt-shift adapter to have movements. What sealed the deal for me was making 17" x 25" prints with the X-T2 and comparing them to prints from the A7R (which had replaced that A7). The Fuji prints were difficult to tell apart from the 36 MP Sony files.

I'm only using medium format now because I discovered that digital view cameras were a thing. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw a Toyo VX23D -- movements on both standards. Hallelujah! The flat GFX 50R was the perfect "back" because the best widest lens I could put on that Toyo with any sensor was the Pentax-A 35mm f/3.5, and on 33mm x 44mm it made for a wider field of view.

I did a lot of work with that Fuji, and the images I made are still some of my favourites. I don't like tilt-shift adapters, but if I had to adopt the lightest possible kit that gave me movements, I could be happy with a modern APS-C sensor and one of the better adapter designs.
 

ThdeDude

Well-known member
I installed the RRS leveler RRS TA-2u-LB on my CP 30 S4 -II seems to work pretty well with out a lot of extra weight
Dave
Yes, have been also thinking about the RRS TA-2U-LB Leveling Base. What has been your experience?

The advantage of the leveling base for use with a (heavy) technical camera is that there is less chance of a tipping the tripod since the camera can't fall into the 90 degree drop notch.

But I am not sure whether 40 degrees movement would be enough. Maybe a L-bracket if more is needed? Or simply use a different tripod head when, say, in a slot canyon or doing architectural work.
 
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vjbelle

Well-known member
I commented on using a leveling base for stability in the 'Tripod and Head' thread but to repeat it is the 'Strength' of the leveling base that is most important to me. Absolutely nothing moves when the base is tight. I can have an AS M-Two tripod mounted on my shoulder and it will never move. I certainly don't take hikes that way but short walks are much more convenient if everything doesn't have to be broken down. If I need more movement than the base can provide a tripod leg shortened a little always does the trick. Along with the RRS leveling base I also have the Kirk which is easily as nice. I use them with the RRS PC-Pro panning clamp.

Victor B.IMG_3927.jpg
 
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ThdeDude

Well-known member
... I switched down a size to a Fuji X-T2. ...
Me jumping in here.

I have a philosophical issue with the use of the word "down" when moving to a smaller sensor size or with "up" when moving to a larger sensor size. Generally also somewhat negatively or positively, respectively, associated.

I see it more "horses for courses" than "up" or "down".

Would be nice if Fuji would also offer shift/tilt lenses for their X line.
 
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ThdeDude

Well-known member
... it is the 'Strength' of the leveling base that is most important to me. Absolutely nothing moves when the base is tight. ... If I need more movement than the base can provide a tripod leg shortened a little always does the trick. ...
Thx for the reply. RRS TA-2U-LB Leveling Base is ordered.
 

rdeloe

Well-known member
Me jumping in here.

I have a philosophical issue with the use of the word "down" when moving to a smaller sensor size or with "up" when moving to a larger sensor size. Generally also somewhat negatively or positively, respectively, associated.

I see it more "horses for courses" than "up" or "down".

Would be nice if Fuji would also offer shift/tilt lenses for their X line.
I hear you, but it's "down" as in "down a size". There's no implied negative connotation.

This morning I was looking at some of the work I did with that X-T2 and a tilt-shift adapter with Olympus OM lenses. Objectively, I think it's still some of the best work I've done with any format (film, digital, large format, small formats). Wider than 24mm was always the problem. There are more interesting options now that can be adapted for use as tilt-shift lenses with APS-C sensors, such as the lenses from Laowa.
 

ThdeDude

Well-known member
... If I need more movement than the base can provide a tripod leg shortened a little always does the trick.
And of course if the tripod has the option of different tripod angles, this gives another option for more movement. Did not think of that before.
 

vjbelle

Well-known member
A critical part of my simple head setup is the RRS PC-Pro panning head. I only have one place where there can be any lateral movement and that is the tilting mechanism which is extremely strong. The whole thing weighs 633g which is fairly light.

Victor B.
 

dave massolo

New member
Yes, have been also thinking about the RRS TA-2U-LB Leveling Base. What has been your experience?

The advantage of the leveling base for use with a (heavy) technical camera is that there is less chance of a tipping the tripod since the camera can't fall into the 90 degree drop notch.

But I am not sure whether 40 degrees movement would be enough. Maybe a L-bracket if more is needed? Or simply use a different tripod head when, say, in a slot canyon or doing architectural work.
Hi I think with using a tech camera with a leveling base that can sit in the tripod collar would be a more secure choice.
 
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