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"Capturing Infrared"

scho

Well-known member
Another image taken on the Ithaca College campus with the Canon EOS R (FS) RF35/1.8+Kolari IRChrome filter. B&W conversion in LR and tonal values adjusted with the hue/saturation/luminance color sliders.

 

ggibson

Well-known member
I recently converted a Sigma DP1m to full spectrum. I have been experimenting with the full spectrum results and a few filters for various looks. The full spectrum images have the old Kodak Aerochrome look to them with red foliage and blue skies straight out of camera (using a custom WB). Here is an album and a few of my favorites so far:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamgibson/albums/72157715236202693

Full spectrum with polarizing filter (for darker skies, reduce reflections):


Winding path by Graham Gibson, on Flickr


Lafayette Reservoir Dock by Graham Gibson, on Flickr


Stream and filtered light by Graham Gibson, on Flickr
 

ggibson

Well-known member
Mimicking the yellow vegetation of the bayer sensor channel swap on a foveon sensor is quite different. Using a Hoya Red 25A filter limits the range of colors while still retaining some separation in the foliage to achieve results like below. I don't have a consistent process nailed down yet. While the aerochrome reds I posted above are pretty close to the image on the live view screen, using a red filter makes everything look completely red so it requires some creative visualization. I like the result though, what do you think?


Lion in Gold by Graham Gibson, on Flickr
 

ggibson

Well-known member
More experiments: the Hoya 25A filter cuts around 590nm. Results are completely red in-camera so it is harder to compose, focus, and meter. It's even easier to blow highlights, so underexposing is usually necessary. Most other colors are gone but with a custom WB and Foveon Classic Blue color, I found it possible to get blue skies back. Combining this with a CPL should result in dark blue skies.


Some redwoods by Graham Gibson, on Flickr
 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
Graham, I personally am liking the rendering you're getting with the Green filtration -- it seems to generate just enough separation for both red and yellow greens and adds some depth and texture I find appealing.
 

ggibson

Well-known member
Graham, I personally am liking the rendering you're getting with the Green filtration -- it seems to generate just enough separation for both red and yellow greens and adds some depth and texture I find appealing.
Thanks, Jack! I agree, the results I'm getting with the X1 filter are a bit better than without. Also, it's hard to appreciate here but when I pixel-peep, the sharpness is better as well. I think the filter removes some chromatic separation in the shorter wavelength colors.


Temescal trail by Graham Gibson, on Flickr
 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
Graham,

I took the liberty of grabbing one of your "tonal" IR color images and converting it to B&W. I have to say it generated a very pleasing mono IR rendition. You may be onto something really good :thumbup:
 

ggibson

Well-known member
Thanks, Jack! Which image did you work with? Feel free to post if you would like.

I must admit I'm a sucker for color, so I don't shoot or process images in B&W often enough. I will take it as a challenge to do some more with this camera though :thumbs:

Until then, I have a few more color images to share that I've already processed :cool:


In the reeds by Graham Gibson, on Flickr


In the reeds by Graham Gibson, on Flickr
 
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