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Fun with Nikon Images

D&A

Well-known member
Wonderful shot Pramote. Besides the obvious beauty, the shot has the wonder if the branches and leaves of the tree are or have been wind blown or that's it's shape? Lovely capture!

Dave (D&A)
 
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Landscapelover

Senior Subscriber Member
Thank you for your kind my dear friend! I posted this picture here before and also a similar picture taken with Phase One in MF forums.
I watched the interview by Michael Kenna who said his prints from the same film he sold were always different because he processed them differently every times in a dark room. He would be bored if he processed the prints the same way every times.
I've been simulating his approach by re-editing almost every times I posted the pictures until one day I've got it right. It's never happened!
 

Landscapelover

Senior Subscriber Member
Pramote, cracking shot!
I seem to remember a similar shot you took on Medium format? I do remember it was quite stunning! (y)
Wonderful shot Pramote. Besides the obvious beauty, the shot has the wonder if the branches and leaves of the tree are or have been wind blown or that's it's shape? Lovely capture!

Dave (D&A)
Thank you Dave! I very much appreciate your thoughtful comment.
This picture was taken at the "Southern Point Complex". Yes, you're right. The shape of the branches were caused by constant wind blows.
From Google search "The South Point Complex, is located at the southern tip of the Island of Hawai'i on Ka Lae(the point), 16 miles south of the town of Naalehu. It is the southernmost point in both the Hawaiian Islands and the United States and is made up of a group of sites which are among the oldest in the Islands".
 
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D&A

Well-known member
For fun, I usually give a title to my selected image but in this case I was torn between "Symmetry", "Group Hug" or "Show Off" :)
What I did find interesting though is the symmetry of each feather comparing the right and left side wings....right down to comparing each respective feather (right side vs. left) including and especially if each respective pair is split or curled, it's shape or even its distance (if any) to the adjacent feather. I didn't count, but it appears the precise number of feathers are the same comparing each side. Guess that's mother natures way or ensuring stable flight, much like an airplane's symmetry.

Nikon Df; Tamron 70-300 f4-f5.6

Dave (D&A)

 

Jack

Sr. Administrator
Staff member
Light split sepia attempt from C1. Trying to hit on a balance of hue and saturation I find appealing in both the lows and highs; one that renders close to what I used to get from a warm-tone silver-based print paper as opposed to say a full-on sepia-toned print. This one has a bit less saturation in the highlights than it does the shadows. My eyes are really sensitive to red and green, and many base sepia styles I've tried for either C1 or PS tend to be too far one way or the other and usually a little too heavy for my tastes. (Edit: @Darin Marcus' image directly above I think has a really good neutral tone as well -- kudos 👍)

New for me too, is I output this as a direct 1200px web jpeg from C1. Normally I'd port the full 16-bit psd over to PS and then sharpen and step resize, as historically it produced a better result. It appears that extra effort is no longer necessary. It is perhaps a little less "sharp" than my step reduced version, but to my eyes it actually seems a little more natural. I need to do a few more before drawing a final conclusion.


Z7, 24-70/4S, 31mm, 1/80 f10 ISO64
 
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Darin Marcus

Well-known member
Light split sepia attempt from C1. Trying to hit on a balance of hue and saturation I find appealing in both the lows and highs; one that renders close to what I used to get from a warm-tone silver-based print paper as opposed to say a full-on sepia-toned print. This one has a bit less saturation in the highlights than it does the shadows. My eyes are really sensitive to red and green, and many base sepia styles I've tried for either C1 or PS tend to be too far one way or the other and usually a little too heavy for my tastes. (Edit: @Darin Marcus' image directly above I think has a really good neutral tone as well -- kudos 👍)

New for me too, is I output this as a direct 1200px web jpeg from C1. Normally I'd port the full 16-bit psd over to PS and then sharpen and step resize, as historically it produced a better result. It appears that extra effort is no longer necessary. It is perhaps a little less "sharp" than my step reduced version, but to my eyes it actually seems a little more natural. I need to do a few more before drawing a final conclusion.
Thank you Jack!
As I posted a while ago, I am not that experienced in monochrome conversions - In fact I converted more images to B&W/Sepia in the past 2 months than in the previous 5 years :)
But I carefully read your thread about B&W conversions and tried to learn something from it...

I am using Capture NX-D to process NEFs, as you know, and I am mostly eyeballing things - playing with the available filters (yellow, orange, red, green), the saturation slider for the selected toning option, and so on. For this photo the green filter looked best to my eyes, and then I decreased a little the saturation, brightness and contrast in the monochrome picture control panel. Since exporting from Capture NX-D is still not working in Big Sur, I had to open the photo in ViewNX-i, which applies all the editing done in Capture NX-D, and can export to TIFF 16 bits :D

Finally I opened the TIFF in Lightroom, but decided no fine tuning is needed, just resize/export the photo for posting.
 
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