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The Fujinon GF Tilt Shift Lenses Are Finally Here!

The Fujinon GF Tilt Shift Lenses Are Finally Here!
By Dave Gallagher
Posted September 12, 2023
In Fujifilm, Fujifilm GFX, Fujifilm Tip, News




I can’t remember the last time I anticipated a lens release that would impact my market as much as the new Fujinon Tilt Shift lenses. Fujifilm has shocked the photography market over and over again by creating the highest quality extra low dispersion aspherical lenses at an amazing low cost to the consumer. But one glaring hole in their line up has always been the lack of any lenses with movements. This has forced the architectural / table top photographer to either use a different digital camera, attach a digital back to a Cambo view camera, or, at worst, “correct in post.” But alas, this no longer has to be the case. We can now begin taking orders on these two lenses immediately.
Let’s get all the technical data out of the way first. Take a look at the following specs to compare these two long awaited lenses against each other.

Search:
FUJINON GF 30MM F/5.6 T/SFUJINON GF 110MM F/5.6 T/S MACRO
35mm Equivalent24mm87mm
Elements1611
Degrees of Tilt8.5°10°
MM of Shift15mm15mm
Angle of View84.7°27.9°
Focus Distance12"17.2"
Max Magnification.21x.5x
Filter Size105mm72mm
Height5.5"5.85"
Weight2.95 lbs2.76 lbs
Lens HoodYesNo
Adapter ring and Tripod CollarYesNo
Ships onOctober 26thNovember 30th
Price$3,999.95$3,499.95
Showing 1 to 14 of 14 entries
THE FEATURES THAT STAND OUT
  • 15mm of Shift in each direction – This is 3mm more than the current “competitive” T/S lenses
  • Shift and Rotation angle data stored in the metadata of the image
  • Large 85mm images circle that more than covers the 33×44 sensor
  • The highest quality optics – 3 GM, 3 ED, and 1 Super ED elements
WHY DOES THIS MATTER?
This is just plain simple. The current crop of T/S lenses fail when combined with today’s high resolution sensors. And yes, we have no issue stating this over and over. If you know anything about Capture Integration, then you know we back up our statements with knowledge and real world testing. We have been amazed at just how all of the top brand’s T/S lenses fail when we compare them to a fixed lens shifted on a body with movement. And they don’t just fail, they fail in plummeting ball of flames.
THE TEST
We performed a very simple panoramic 3 image stitch with a Canon R5 and a Fujifilm GFX 100s. The bodies are in the same exact location using the same tripod mount. Below are the specs for each body

  • Fujifilm GFX 100s 100mp Digital Camera body
  • Fujinon GF 30mm T/S Lens
  • 15mm shift Left, 15mm Shift right, and straight shot
  • Stitched in PS 2022
  • ISO100, f/5.6, 1/30th second
  • No sharpening or retouching – 1 stop of midtone adjustment

  • Canon R5 45mp Digital Camera body
  • Canon EF to R Lens adapter
  • Canon 24mm T/S II Lens
  • 12mm Left, 12mm right, and straight shot
  • Stitched in PS 2022
  • ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/30th of a second
  • No sharpening or retouching – 1 stop of midtone adjustment
Fuji GFX 100s with GF 30mm T/S
Canon R5 with 24mm T/S II

Fujifilm on the left and Canon on the right
At the center, these two images show a megapixel resolution difference. That is all. You can’t expect a 45mp Canon Sensor to resolve what a 100mp Fujifilm sensor can resolve. Both images were as sharp as to be expected of these two systems. The Canon file resolved as we thought it would and is suitable for many lower resolution needs.

Fujifilm on the left and Canon on the right
The focus chart on the right was not positioned all the way to the end of the frame for either body. At this point we can see both a resolution limitation and a lens failure. The Canon file shows the beginning of a radial blur issue that we see with every single Canon T/S lens. This issue can produce a decent image and many don’t even recognize that their lens has an issue. But remember, the Canon 24mm T/S II is on the front of a 45mp body. Add this lens to a 100mp body and the results become unacceptable.

Fujifilm on the left and Canon on the right
When the focus charts on the left are imaged with the maximum shift on each camera body/lens combination, the true depth of the problem is illustrated. The Canon system has both radial blur and severe distortion. And it shows that this body lens combination is not linear. One side is severely worse than the other. We at CI see these issues daily when customers finally decide to move up from 35mm DSLR/Mirroless systems to the higher quality medium format capture systems. The knee jerk reaction is that “we must have a bad lens” and I assure you that all of our tests with multiple Canon lenses show this same issue. Yes, some lenses are more extreme than others. And this is what led us to liquidate our full dslr inventory a few years back.

IT CAN’T BE THIS MUCH OF A DIFFERENCE…
I love the quality of my iPhone. It takes a darn good image. But when I compare it to an actual interchangeable-lens digital camera, it pales in comparison. By itself is is great! Side by side, I can see the real difference.
And I can unequivocally state that this is the same situation here. 35mm systems fail when compared side by side to medium format sensors on view cameras, tech cameras, or now, a native T/S lens. In my experience, T/S dslr glass has failed for years. Many photographers use them because it’s all that has been available or that it is just “good enough” for their clients needs. If you want to know what I think about that “good enough” mentality, then do a search of our website for “good enough”. It’s an enjoyable read.
THANK YOU FUJIFILM
We are thrilled to have these high quality lenses available to our Fujifilm customers today. This medium format combination should be the gateway for many 35mm sensor customers to move up to the quality of medium format capture. If I am a Fuji GFX shooter then I would want the option to be able to pull out one, if not both of these lenses, out of my camera bag when I needed them. We anticipate a very large back order. Please place your order as soon as possible to secure your spot in the queue.


FUJINON GF30MM T/S
ORDER NOW

FUJINON GF110MM T/S MACRO
ORDER NOW
 
Thank you for posting, I had my TS-E 50 and 90 macro lenses listed for sale on FM and decided to withdraw them. Even though I don't use them a whole lot, your tests helped me realize that I would probably regret selling them. Fuji doesn't have a full line of TS lenses yet, but combining the Fuji 30mm and 110mm with the Canon 50mm and 90mm macros will give you a damn good set.
Yes, now we have a real setup for architecture in the GF system. For me it will be GF 30mm TS, TS-E 50mm L, TS-E 90mm L, and a Nikon PC-E 19mm for ultrawide.
The weakest spot in the lineup is now the ultrawide end. The Nikon PC-E 19mm via an electronic adapter is much better than the TS-E 17mm. But the Nikon has a lot of distortion which requires post processing work. But image quality is pretty good (although not as good as the TS-E 50mm).

So I hope that the new GF TS lenses sell so well, that Fuji continues with a shift lens around 21mm soon ;-)
And if the would add something in the 50mm ballpark, I would probably buy that too, just to get 15mm shift instead of the 12mm of the TS-E 50mm.
 
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drevil

Well-known member
Staff member
The sample RAWs from dpreview are showing a high performer, although they dont have any extreme shifts to the left or right, but the standard view is very sharp
 

algrove

Well-known member
I saw a Fuji video in Japanese where one designer mentioned the 30 is designed like a 19mm, if I got it right. Did not understand that comment at all.
 

dchew

Well-known member
Lou, it might be because a horizontal shift +- 15 mm gives an image circle about 81mm. Compare that to the native 44x33 image circle at 55mm, and you get 55/81=0.68.
0.68 x the 30mm focal length is 20mm. Close to that 19mm comment.
Dave
 

peterm1

Active member
Anyone use the Canon 50mm TS-E adapted to X2D? I have the 17mm and 24mm II and they just don't perform well except in the center (so I only use them on my Sony A7RV), but I know the 50mm TS-E is a great performer generally. (That GFX100 II is one UGLY camera IMHO but now I am jealous of that new 30mm TS)...
 

drevil

Well-known member
Staff member
Anyone use the Canon 50mm TS-E adapted to X2D? I have the 17mm and 24mm II and they just don't perform well except in the center (so I only use them on my Sony A7RV), but I know the 50mm TS-E is a great performer generally. (That GFX100 II is one UGLY camera IMHO but now I am jealous of that new 30mm TS)...
one trick to use the 17TSE on a 44x33 sensor, is to focus on the edge of the image and then stop down to at least F11, this usually brings better results than to focus in the center
 
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peterm1

Active member
one trick to use the 17TSE on a 44x33 sensor, is to focus on the edge of the image and then stop down to at least F11, this usually brings better results than to focus in the center
Thanks for the tip! Just tried it and there is an improvement (may be good enough in some situations).
 

diggles

Well-known member
The sample RAWs from dpreview are showing a high performer, although they dont have any extreme shifts to the left or right, but the standard view is very sharp
I changed the profile in the RAWs from dpreview from Provia to Reala Ace, I like the new profile. Similar to Provia, but the blues and reds are a bit less saturated.
 

kinglang

Active member
one trick to use the 17TSE on a 44x33 sensor, is to focus on the edge of the image and then stop down to at least F11, this usually brings better results than to focus in the center
I find it especially noticeable with the ef11-24mm, that the f4 focuses very differently at the edges than in the center.
 
I wish these could be adapted for use on my X2D.
Yes, I can understand. First samples look outstanding. Sharp corners with full shift at f8. Crazy for such a wide lens. Lots of my collegues among architectural photographers switched to Fuji from Canon or Sony last year. Now after the announcment of the GF 30mm TS there is another rush. Hopefully Hasselblad will compete, but I am not sure. Seems that their traget group is a bit different.
 

hcubell

Well-known member
I think it is highly unlikely that Hasselblad will try to jump into the professional product/architectural photography market. I don't think they see that as part of their target market, and there are are a number of areas where they would be better off directing their resources.
 

Ai_Print

Active member
I think it is highly unlikely that Hasselblad will try to jump into the professional product/architectural photography market. I don't think they see that as part of their target market, and there are are a number of areas where they would be better off directing their resources.
That'd be a bummer, I find it essential for some landscapes and already employ that technique readily in other formats. That alone could cause me to "tilt" towards the Fuji MFD system.
 
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Paul Spinnler

Well-known member

The X can easily be adapted with tech cam lenses via adapter on Alpa. In fact, it is a very nifty solution for X camera owners ... it is an interesting combo to use X2D, Alpa STC and world class Rodie glass. You can use 32 and up with the TC and 50 and up with the other Alpa cameras due to the grip of the X camera with some specific limitations:


IMHO it is an amazing solution if you can live with 32mm without shift or 40mm (40 CFE IF, V system) or 50mm (Rodie Digaron-W) upwards. Mamiya also has some interesting options with the 45mm to be had for 200 bucks, but I wouldn't know how good this is; I am sure though that it gives a few mm or rise.

32 with a TC is also great as you should have perfect sharpness at F4 and to capture tall building you can correct for the perspective in post if you tilt the lens a bit up to get the shot without in-body shift. Modern-day automated perspective control in C1 and generative fill for the edges and sky in Photoshop should solve perspective problems in practice.

With the 90 HR you can create huge high-res stitches.
 
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tcdeveau

Well-known member

The X can easily be adapted with tech cam lenses via adapter on Alpa. In fact, it is a very nifty solution for X camera owners ... it is an interesting combo to use X2D, Alpa STC and world class Rodie glass. You can use 32 and up with the TC and 50 and up with the other Alpa cameras due to the grip of the X camera with some specific limitations:


IMHO it is an amazing solution if you can live with 32mm without shift or 40mm (40 CFE IF, V system) or 50mm (Rodie Digaron-W) upwards. Mamiya also has some interesting options with the 45mm to be had for 200 bucks, but I wouldn't know how good this is; I am sure though that it gives a few mm or rise.

32 with a TC is also great as you should have perfect sharpness at F4 and to capture tall building you can correct for the perspective in post if you tilt the lens a bit up to get the shot without in-body shift. Modern-day automated perspective control in C1 and generative fill for the edges and sky in Photoshop should solve perspective problems in practice.

With the 90 HR you can create huge high-res stitches.
Beating a dead horse with my forthcoming comment, but, if only theyd release a CFV100c back :)

I’m impressed with what they’ve done with the GFX system. I wasn’t expecting the 500mm announcement, that lens, plus TS lenses, fast lenses that don’t cost $4-5k, and subject tracking af will tick lots of boxes for lots of folks.
 
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