The GetDPI Photography Forum

Great to see you here. Join our insightful photographic forum today and start tapping into a huge wealth of photographic knowledge. Completing our simple registration process will allow you to gain access to exclusive content, add your own topics and posts, share your work and connect with other members through your own private inbox! And don’t forget to say hi!

EOS R5 Announcement

biglouis

Well-known member
Currently shooting Fuji - moved to the system for wildlife but got sucked into using the bodies for all my work (also own the GFX50R but that is another story and not relevant to the R5/R6).

Also, right off the bat given some of the discussion above, based on years of struggle and experience, Panasonic's DFD focus system sucks for wildlife and is the main reason I left m43rds after almost ten years of continuous use (as my interest in wildlife shooting began to eclipse my other photographic interests).

OK, so the R5 and R6 are beautifully specified cameras and woohoo!!!!! have 12/20 fps speeds which are great for wildlife - which Nikon still seems to be wilfully ignoring in their mirrorless cameras. And, sorry to insult people but another advantage is that they offer the first real competition from Nikon/Canon to Sony which I just don't like (personal thing, I admit).

However, I am not in a hurry to go Canon mirrorless for two reasons. Firstly, no fast native RF wildlife glass. Couldn't Canon have at least given us a RF 500/5.6? Secondly, the price.

In the UK the Canon R6 is over GBP 1,000 more expensive than the recently introduced X-T4 (which as a Fuji user makes more sense for me to consider). I would be seriously thinking about switching and using adapted EOS lenses if only the R6 was priced accordingly. I do not think an extra £1K is worth is for a full frame sensor.

But I'll definitely look with interest on reviews by wildlife photographers using both bodies and never say never.

Just my two cents

LouisB
 

SrMphoto

Active member
I had already given up on Canon. My first DSLR was Canon D3 (2001) and the last Canon I owned was 5D. I switched to Nikon D700, and continued with Nikon up to Z 7. Canon R5 and the RF lenses have awakened my interest in the Canon brand.

I am especially intrigued by the fact that Canon is creating different lenses, they are not stuck to the classic range/aperture combinations. I am very interested in the two new f/11 lenses. The DOF is still very shallow at those focal lengths, only issue is the 2 stop light loss when compared to f/5.6. By making the lenses slow, one can create lightweight but high-quality lenses. Looking forward to seeing reports about the image quality.
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
I had already given up on Canon. My first DSLR was Canon D3 (2001) and the last Canon I owned was 5D. I switched to Nikon D700, and continued with Nikon up to Z 7. Canon R5 and the RF lenses have awakened my interest in the Canon brand.

I am especially intrigued by the fact that Canon is creating different lenses, they are not stuck to the classic range/aperture combinations. I am very interested in the two new f/11 lenses. The DOF is still very shallow at those focal lengths, only issue is the 2 stop light loss when compared to f/5.6. By making the lenses slow, one can create lightweight but high-quality lenses. Looking forward to seeing reports about the image quality.
The video I posted above (from B&H Photo) has some IQ from the 600 and 800 lenses. They also mention that these cameras can AF down to f/22. I’m interested in how much DR will be available from these sensors but naturally that’s hard to gauge from preproduction samples and reduced bit depth video compared to photography. I see no point in me switching for what I do. I’m quite happy with the S1R and the Sony handles everything AF that I have a need for as well... but I agree that Canon has not been of interest to me at all (outside the original 6D and the 1Dx) since I switched from them in 2008.
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
Currently shooting Fuji - moved to the system for wildlife but got sucked into using the bodies for all my work (also own the GFX50R but that is another story and not relevant to the R5/R6).

Also, right off the bat given some of the discussion above, based on years of struggle and experience, Panasonic's DFD focus system sucks for wildlife and is the main reason I left m43rds after almost ten years of continuous use (as my interest in wildlife shooting began to eclipse my other photographic interests).

OK, so the R5 and R6 are beautifully specified cameras and woohoo!!!!! have 12/20 fps speeds which are great for wildlife - which Nikon still seems to be wilfully ignoring in their mirrorless cameras. And, sorry to insult people but another advantage is that they offer the first real competition from Nikon/Canon to Sony which I just don't like (personal thing, I admit).

However, I am not in a hurry to go Canon mirrorless for two reasons. Firstly, no fast native RF wildlife glass. Couldn't Canon have at least given us a RF 500/5.6? Secondly, the price.

In the UK the Canon R6 is over GBP 1,000 more expensive than the recently introduced X-T4 (which as a Fuji user makes more sense for me to consider). I would be seriously thinking about switching and using adapted EOS lenses if only the R6 was priced accordingly. I do not think an extra £1K is worth is for a full frame sensor.

But I'll definitely look with interest on reviews by wildlife photographers using both bodies and never say never.

Just my two cents

LouisB
I thought of your troubles with Micro 4/3 when I watched videos. I haven’t really had any AF issues with the S1R but I don’t really do wildlife either. I’m happy that someone is taking mirrorless seriously other than Sony and L-Mount (though in a niche way) to push others to continue to innovate. It seems like a great camera that will have it’s quirks like every other camera once it gets into the hands of people over the next couple of months.
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
Good luck to Canon for their new cameras. :thumbs:
I'll stick with my A9. :salute:
Interested though what Sony will come up with later this summer. :grin:
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
Good luck to Canon for their new cameras. :thumbs:
I'll stick with my A9. :salute:
Interested though what Sony will come up with later this summer. :grin:
Yeah I heard a lot of people mentioning fast read out times on the R5/R6. I’m unsure if that “buzzword speak” or a reality since I haven’t been able to pin down a sensor readout time yet. Apparently there’s an embargo on releasing sample shots except for a few online outlets that all seem to be retailers with a YouTube presence.
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
Yeah I heard a lot of people mentioning fast read out times on the R5/R6. I’m unsure if that “buzzword speak” or a reality since I haven’t been able to pin down a sensor readout time yet. Apparently there’s an embargo on releasing sample shots except for a few online outlets that all seem to be retailers with a YouTube presence.
Thanks Tre. Well, I guess we’ll eventually find out about the sensor readout times. Equal or faster than 1/160 s, Sony’s best number so far. :grin:
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
I believe we have a larger photographic crowd here but I just came across this report on the video performance that many of the videos are focused on. It’s really not any surprise and I always wondered why so many people that primarily focused on video production gravitated so heavily towards hybrid system cameras when a true Cine/ENG style camera provides so many more options for video production (at a higher price generally yes).

https://www.eoshd.com/news/canon-eos-r5-has-serious-overheating-issues-in-both-4k-and-8k/#more-23011

I still believe both the R5/R6 are amazing and will serve most people well but for those that believed this would be a high megapixel camera and a substitute for a RED Monstro 8K VV... well we aren’t there yet. For the YouTube and short form video crowd, it’s likely a great option. I’d be wary if I were primarily interested in doing wedding video, corporate video, or cinematography. IT seems like there may be some better options out there like the Cinema EOS line, Blackmagic Design cameras, or the Panasonic S1H if one was insistent on utilizing the hybrid system camera form factor.
 

jduncan

Member
IF the camera does not have a major flaw, is far ahead of anything else. See Irene R video to see it focus with almost no light. There is a reason Canon introduced the f11 lenses. The only weakness is the 70-200mm f2.8 lens: not really professional, one have to turn the zoom multiple times to go from. 70 to. 200mm, that means you could miss a shoot easily.

3 videos:

creative and low light focus:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_byYwav5ccM&t=3s
action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=581U_IVFA1Q&t=138s
Fashion : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISAGT5DO-gU


I am a Nikon shooter, but this machine is tempting.
If by April next year Nikon is not able to compete (either by releasing a competitive machine or by lowring the prices and becoming the low price option) I will start to plan the swtich.

It's not just speed is the fact that a. 85mm f1.4 is not even in the Z roadmap but we have a. 58mm f0.95 shows that the companie lack direction.

Best regards,
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
IF the camera does not have a major flaw, is far ahead of anything else. See Irene R video to see it focus with almost no light. There is a reason Canon introduced the f11 lenses. The only weakness is the 70-200mm f2.8 lens: not really professional, one have to turn the zoom multiple times to go from. 70 to. 200mm, that means you could miss a shoot easily.

3 videos:

creative and low light focus:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_byYwav5ccM&t=3s
action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=581U_IVFA1Q&t=138s
Fashion : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISAGT5DO-gU


I am a Nikon shooter, but this machine is tempting.
If by April next year Nikon is not able to compete (either by releasing a competitive machine or by lowring the prices and becoming the low price option) I will start to plan the swtich.

It's not just speed is the fact that a. 85mm f1.4 is not even in the Z roadmap but we have a. 58mm f0.95 shows that the companie lack direction.

Best regards,
To be honest, most of the photographic features they highlight in most of the video have been in Sony (and other mirrorless) cameras for years. The A9 can autofocus down to f/16. The R5 can autofocus down to f/22. It’s a nice to have feature for me but quite honestly f/2.8 and f/4 are the slowest lenses that I own.

I can understand the excitement because these are new features to Canon (and would be to Nikon as well) but I don’t need to buy into a new system to experience these types of features. For video, I feel like the S1H is still far ahead as there aren’t any recording limit restrictions due to the active cooling solution Panasonic chose to go with. I can understand not liking Sony... there are aspects of it that are compromised for me but I still feel like it’s the beat all around system for most people today. I may not feel that way next year or even three years from now... time will tell.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
To be honest, most of the photographic features they highlight in most of the video have been in Sony (and other mirrorless) cameras for years.
Fully agree, the same happened when the Z6/7 were announced. Several features already present a long time in other brands were hyped as "new and revolutionary" and now with this Canon the same is happening again. It's just marketing hype but so be it :loco:

It's a competent camera for sure but like when the Z6/7 was announced nothing really new under the sun. And looking at the size of the body (in the beginning of the video they compare it against a 5D) it's way too big for me, but obviously that's a personal thing, some people want big and then this might be the right camera for them.
 
Last edited:

AlexLF

Well-known member
Well, as a used-to-be a photographer (not a pro as I never earned money on it and I don't plan to) and now mostly a video guy I really think I'm in. And the main reason to get R5 is not their "new features" and not 8K (who really needs it!?). But the lenses! RF 85/1.2 and 50/1.2 is the main reason to get back to photography for me. The pics are just stunning! Yes, they're expensive but then this is exactly kind of lenses I want and need.

Also, being a landscape and portrait photographer I really appreciate 45 MP and seems-to-be very good autofocus. ...and other nice features :)

I was thinking about S1R originally but ... no such lenses really for L-mount. So here I go - R5 it is.
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
Fully agree, the same happened when the Z6/7 were announced. Several features already present a long time in other brands were hyped as "new and revolutionary" and now with this Canon the same is happening again. It's just marketing hype but so be it :loco:

It's a competent camera for sure but like when the Z6/7 was announced nothing really new under the sun. And looking at the size of the body (in the beginning of the video they compare it against a 5D) it's way too big for me, but obviously that's a personal thing, some people want big and then this might be the right camera for them.
I agree on the hype but I understand it. People are excited to see something innovative and new from Canon. It’s a change of their course over the last 10 years or so. I do find that this system in true cost may actually be more expensive than other Mirrorless options... maybe even approaching and exceeding the costs of going L-Mount, Sony, and some MF Mirrorless options depending on the body lens combinations.

Size wise, the R5 is roughly the size of the A7RIV (well about a half inch wider and quarter inch taller). The body is likely smaller than it looks and weighs a little less than the Sony too.
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
Well, as a used-to-be a photographer (not a pro as I never earned money on it and I don't plan to) and now mostly a video guy I really think I'm in. And the main reason to get R5 is not their "new features" and not 8K (who really needs it!?). But the lenses! RF 85/1.2 and 50/1.2 is the main reason to get back to photography for me. The pics are just stunning! Yes, they're expensive but then this is exactly kind of lenses I want and need.

Also, being a landscape and portrait photographer I really appreciate 45 MP and seems-to-be very good autofocus. ...and other nice features :)

I was thinking about S1R originally but ... no such lenses really for L-mount. So here I go - R5 it is.
I agree that the lenses are the best thing about the RF system and their desire to go away from typical classic lens designs. The 28-70/2 is probably the best lens that I’ve tried in the system as it can replace primes in those ranges. The 85/1.2 is nice but I didn’t feel it was any better or worse than offerings of other companies. The f/1.2 gives Canon some bragging rights but I don’t shoot wide open for everything all the time. Wider apertures for me (when I do wedding and event work) are more about light gathering than shallow DoF so I do find the wide aperture to be important to have... but not for what many people utilize them for.

Regarding L-Mount, it IS an expensive system. Price aside, I’d take the Leica 90 APO-Cron over the Canon RF 85/1.2... but that’s just me. I personally believe the Panasonic 50/1.4 or the Leica 50’s are every bit as good as (if not better) than the Canon RF 50/1.2. At the end of the day though you can’t go wrong with any of these options and at this level we are all just just subjective nitpicking which gets amplified somewhat due to personal preferences.

If I was starting from absolute scratch I feel I’d have to consider the Canon R5/R6 combo for my needs. I don’t love fully articulating screens as my only option but I get they’re preferred for video people and vloggers. I prefer tilting screens that remain in line with the lens personally so my bias as someone mostly behind the camera skews that way admittedly. I tend to agree that the biggest thing about these cameras are their photographic applications but Canon focused on the headlines highlighting the technically impressive video capability (however abbreviated Canon admits that it is). Not many previews highlighted this but the Vistek and Max Yuryev Youtube Videos did in fact point it out for those buying into the system for the video specs. I’ve always remained consistent in thinking that for video heavy work, a Cine/ENG camera is almost almost a much better video option. For photo, we have always had access to high resolution cameras and excellent lenses. So many are just dedicated to the idea of exclusively adapting SLR lenses - and for that Canon or Nikon offers a better option with their native adapters for their branded lenses.
 

Knorp

Well-known member
I agree on the hype but I understand it. People are excited to see something innovative and new from Canon. It’s a change of their course over the last 10 years or so. I do find that this system in true cost may actually be more expensive than other Mirrorless options... maybe even approaching and exceeding the costs of going L-Mount, Sony, and some MF Mirrorless options depending on the body lens combinations.

Size wise, the R5 is roughly the size of the A7RIV (well about a half inch wider and quarter inch taller). The body is likely smaller than it looks and weighs a little less than the Sony too.
Actually they're 'almost' identical. For size (and heft) I'd prefer the Canon. The Sony without battery-grip or the grip-extender is just too small for me.

Canon R5
Weight (inc. batteries) 738 g (1.63 lb / 26.03 oz)
Dimensions 138 x 98 x 88 mm (5.43 x 3.84 x 3.46″)

Sony A7RIV
Weight (inc. batteries) 665 g (1.47 lb / 23.46 oz)
Dimensions 129 x 96 x 78 mm (5.08 x 3.78 x 3.07″)
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
It's a monster.

This is the best review I have seen, it's not about specs but creative possibilities. Highly recomended.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_byYwav5ccM

Best regards,
Maybe it’s just me but I didn’t see anything in that video that can’t be done with other Mirrorless cameras - though admittedly most of my Mirrorless experience is with Sony, Panasonic, and Leica. Some of that may be new to Canon Mirrorless shooters (and perhaps Nikon as well) as I only have limited time and experience with either Mirrorless system... but I do believe all of those types of shots can be done with most any modern pro Mirrorless cameras from what I saw. I value her input but I don’t consider touting shooting between ISO 400-640 to be high ISO performance. Now if we are talking clean imagery between ISO 3200+ where it pretty much still looks like base ISO then my interest is piqued.
 

iiiNelson

Well-known member
Actually they're 'almost' identical. For size (and heft) I'd prefer the Canon. The Sony without battery-grip or the grip-extender is just too small for me.

Canon R5
Weight (inc. batteries) 738 g (1.63 lb / 26.03 oz)
Dimensions 138 x 98 x 88 mm (5.43 x 3.84 x 3.46″)

Sony A7RIV
Weight (inc. batteries) 665 g (1.47 lb / 23.46 oz)
Dimensions 129 x 96 x 78 mm (5.08 x 3.78 x 3.07″)
Yeah I don’t think anyone will feel the 3 ounce difference most of the time... and yeah I keep a grip on my Sony... but I also found it would’ve been necessary on the EOS R as well because it had one of the most uncomfortable gripS of all of the Mirrorless bodies I tried. I didn’t think it would before I handled it. Without the grip I rank the Mirrorless cameras as such (purely for comfort in my hands). I haven’t handled a SL2 yet so I can’t rank it and it’s been years since I handled a SL 601 so I’ll omit it. Personally I think the Fuji XH1 is ergonomically ideal for daily shooting. It’s not too big or too small but it’s behind the other two for instant comfort.

Fuji GFX 50S
Lumix S
Fuji XH1
Lumix G9/GH5
Sony A7RIV/A9II
Nikon Z
Sony FE (Generation 1-3)
Fuji XT3
Canon RF
Sigma fp
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Not much to say about this camera. They have the best lenses and now apparently the best camera too. Way out of my league at the moment, but I'm very happy that Canon is back in the game.
 

pegelli

Well-known member
Actually they're 'almost' identical. For size (and heft) I'd prefer the Canon. The Sony without battery-grip or the grip-extender is just too small for me.

Canon R5
Weight (inc. batteries) 738 g (1.63 lb / 26.03 oz)
Dimensions 138 x 98 x 88 mm (5.43 x 3.84 x 3.46″)

Sony A7RIV
Weight (inc. batteries) 665 g (1.47 lb / 23.46 oz)
Dimensions 129 x 96 x 78 mm (5.08 x 3.78 x 3.07″)
Well, it depends on your definition of 'almost' ;) , ~7 % in size and ~11 % in weight I think is not negligible ;)
And size/weight wise I'd even prefer the even smaller/lighter A7 and A7ii vs. the current A7Riv, but that's very personal and it's more important how the camera "feels" in your hands than comparing numbers. I have big hands but the small bodies feel good to me without any additional grips or extensions. Maybe it's because I shot Olympus OM2/OM4 long ago and somehow the "feel" the Sony bodies is very similar.

That way I prefer the Sony's over the Nikon's but I am eagerly waiting until I can actually hold an R5 and see how it feels. Don't think I will switch systems but as an equipment lover I'd be very interested to find out how it feels and handles.
 
Top