The GetDPI Photography Forum

Great to see you here. Join our insightful photographic forum today and start tapping into a huge wealth of photographic knowledge. Completing our simple registration process will allow you to gain access to exclusive content, add your own topics and posts, share your work and connect with other members through your own private inbox! And don’t forget to say hi!

  • Recently, there has been an increased activity from spammers, which may result in you receiving unwanted private messages. We are working hard to limit this activity.

Fun with MF images 2021

jng

Well-known member
Fog City
P07_28_20211248_1m00s_AFA_16x9-sharpen-focus-FrameShop.jpg
WRS 1250 | IQ4 150 | Zeiss 350 Tele-Superachromat + APO 1.4XE | f/11 | 1m00s, Automated Frame Average
"Fogust" arrived a bit early this summer in the San Francisco Bay Area. It was quite a sight to see how quicky the fog rolled in yesterday, which allowed me to experiment with my latest mini-project on capturing "fog waves" using long exposure/frame averaging. This image was from just before sunset; the city completely disappeared not long after.

John
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
A walk about in Penang, a World Heritage Island north of Singapore, in a trip in 2018. Along one street, each door on the houses looked interesting. I am not sure of the stories behind each, they are probably residences, and so visually amazing. Here are a few. Hasselblad H3D-39 with HC 2.8/80.

25BC4820-8F10-4C14-B147-E148E9E100F3.jpeg

A0C6D06B-9D9F-47AC-BFF8-6D478F49EB6E.jpeg

5B845BEA-5911-4466-A5A4-75A30D59528A.jpeg
 

huyu

Active member
Fog City
View attachment 186895
WRS 1250 | IQ4 150 | Zeiss 350 Tele-Superachromat + APO 1.4XE | f/11 | 1m00s, Automated Frame Average
"Fogust" arrived a bit early this summer in the San Francisco Bay Area. It was quite a sight to see how quicky the fog rolled in yesterday, which allowed me to experiment with my latest mini-project on capturing "fog waves" using long exposure/frame averaging. This image was from just before sunset; the city completely disappeared not long after.

John
Stunning!
 
  • Thanks
Reactions: jng

Ed Hurst

Well-known member
Fog City
WRS 1250 | IQ4 150 | Zeiss 350 Tele-Superachromat + APO 1.4XE | f/11 | 1m00s, Automated Frame Average
"Fogust" arrived a bit early this summer in the San Francisco Bay Area. It was quite a sight to see how quicky the fog rolled in yesterday, which allowed me to experiment with my latest mini-project on capturing "fog waves" using long exposure/frame averaging. This image was from just before sunset; the city completely disappeared not long after.

John
Stunning! Shot from Oakland?
 
  • Thanks
Reactions: jng

jng

Well-known member
San Francisco Fogscapes
P07_28_20211268_1m00s_AFA-sharpen-focus_v2-FrameShop_3.jpg
WRS 1250 | IQ4 150 | Zeiss 350 Tele-Superachromat + APO 1.4XE | f/11 | 1m00s, Automated Frame Average

P07_28_20211275_16x9-FrameShop_1.jpgWRS 1250 | IQ4 150 | Zeiss 350 Tele-Superachromat + APO 1.4XE | f/11 | 4 sec​

A few more images from my evening of chasing the fog earlier this week, both captured after the sun went down.

John
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
As all of you are well aware, shooting with a tripod is very much not the same as shooting hand-held. Or, at least, if you're only used to one, the other is strange. I actually went out with a tall-ish tripod today and started the long road of practice and experimentation that, one hopes, leads to competence. Here's the best of today's bunch.

Untitled by Matthew Grayson, on Flickr

Matt
 

docholliday

Well-known member
As all of you are well aware, shooting with a tripod is very much not the same as shooting hand-held. Or, at least, if you're only used to one, the other is strange. I actually went out with a tall-ish tripod today and started the long road of practice and experimentation that, one hopes, leads to competence. Here's the best of today's bunch.

Untitled by Matthew Grayson, on Flickr

Matt
I'm one who will handhold before placing on a tripod always. It allows me the fluidity to view different perspectives before finally fixating on a "proper" position. When I first started shooting, I did a lot of wedding and events. That is primarily a handheld activity and it was very important to get the location of the camera right, as it controls the viewer's perspective on how you want to tell the story. A lower perspective (crouching) gives a more "friendly", child-like perspective and a higher (step stool) perspective gives a more commanding, serious perspective. However, too low and you end up looking up the subject's nose, which is a no-no. Too high, and you'll diminish the subject to being dispropotional (midget or giant). There's a fine line being low enough to tell the story and an inch lower means you suddenly have massive nostrils. Even though a waist-level finder gives a more natural perspective for portraits, it is too easy to make it excessive. It really should be called a "chest-level" finder for portraits. The same perspective that gives models a great proportion or emphasis can make a typical portrait subject uncomfortable because of emphaised belly or chest sizing.

When I quit doing events and concentrated on studio work, the same skills learned immediately came in handy. Placing a product on a set and immediately tripoding/standing the camera isn't always best. A half-inch up or down on the camera can make or break a studio shot - say looking into the side of a plate over-emphasizing the space between it and the table vs being up a hair and giving the subject ON the plate the viewer's attention. In studio, "too high a tripod position" can sometimes mean 2 inches! Cups and glasses become distorted or lose dimensionalism, labels become dispropotional, and common items (like silverware, plates, ribbons, or even reflections) start to feel unnatural.

In studio portrait work, the difference between slouching and standing straight up while shooting slightly downward on the subject can make the difference between great face symmetry and a disproportionally large nose on some people. A lot of seated people look better when shot slightly downward (camera center at eyebrow level) to hide chin features.

For architecture and landscape type work, it changes the foreground/background proportions and can make the image look unnatural. Too low a camera in a room emphasizes the foreground and can make the carpet fibers huge (and gaudy looking). Too high and the room feels tight with too much ceiling. The same goes for landscapes where too low and it feels like the ground is long and wide - the viewer feels like the space is small. Too high and the foreground becomes pinched, and can also give some a sense of vertigo! The human mind has been programmed throughout life with scenes we see and we instantly notice when something feels unnatural (at least to our database of scenes). There's a difference between an image that looks good and another that feels good!

There's obvious reasons at times to shoot really high or low, like when emphasizing a leaf in the foreground or shooting a group of cars from high up. That's when the choice of lens comes in to add/remove perspective distortion or compensate for depth of field/focus.

The key to picking a "proper" height has always been to think about how you want the viewer to perceive your shot and story - where you want them to see your perspective from. Then, you've gotta establish the limits to make the image technically "right", realistic, and natural feeling. And I've always found that easiest to do handheld before placing the tripod.

If you want an interesting exercise, try putting a tumbler or small glass on a table, then an object like a lemon a few inches to the front of it and slightly off to one side. Line up your camera and take a shot. Then, move it up or down an inch or two and take a few more shots. Examine them on a large screen or print - notice how the "feel" or realism of the glass changes despite the image looking "correct" to you at first! You may not see it at first, but after a few minutes, you'll suddenly start noticing that one image doesn't feel as good as another...
 
Last edited:
Top