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Fun with MF images

jng

Well-known member

Craig Stocks

Active member
Orion 10-9-2020 2 subs-8.jpg
I've posted similar photos before but I thought this might be of interest. I took this photo of the Orion Nebula last night from a fairly large city under a 50% illuminated full moon. The secret was using a strong light pollution filter. Unfortunately the filter cuts down the light quite a bit so it took a 3 minute exposure to capture the detail. The camera was a Phase One IQ4150 on a Cambo body with a Canon EOS mount which made it easy to attach to the telescope (a SkyWatcher 8 inch Newtonian). This is actually three frames stacked to reduce noise.

I also included an unprocessed frame for comparison. You can see the light pollution filter added a very strong blue/cyan color cast. I've found that Capture One is the best tool to process the RAW files, whether from the IQ4150 or my Sony a7r2. Lightroom seems to make a mess of the files as you try to neutralize the color. You can also see in the RAW that there is an extreme dynamic range in the nebula and most photos use some form of HDR processing to capture detail in the bright central core as well as the more faint dust lanes. The IQ4150 did an admirable job of capturing all of the range in a single exposure.

One lesson I learned the hard way. I started the back taking 3 minute exposures using an intervallomter and went to bed, but the power management was set to turn the back off after 15 minutes. Apparently it doesn't count exposures taken with a remote as activity and it turned off after only capturing 3 frames. I'll know better next time.
 

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tsjanik

Well-known member
Two shots taken with a GFX 50R and a 1960s era Super Takumar, 50mm, f/1.4, 8-element: Thai Dragon peppers are starting to ripen, and they better hurry since frosts are not far away.
Cosmos, a favorite. The dreamy rendering of this lens is fun to explore, but I'm not sure there is an advantage to using a 50R vs. a K-1.
 

Attachments

jng

Well-known member
Golden Gate Twilight
P10_10_2020_25144_45_2-FrameShop_1.jpg
WRS1250 | IQ3100 | 70HR | f/11 | 2-stop GND | 3-stop ND | +/- 15mm stitch

After a week of spectacular low fog events under the Golden Gate Bridge, I finally managed to get out for an early morning shoot. Alas, fog at the gate was nowhere to be seen but the low cloud ceiling made things interesting before the sun came up. And just a few moments later, the top of the Salesforce Tower disappeared in that blanket of fog you see hovering over the city.

John
 

Ed Hurst

Well-known member
I've posted similar photos before but I thought this might be of interest. I took this photo of the Orion Nebula last night from a fairly large city under a 50% illuminated full moon. The secret was using a strong light pollution filter. Unfortunately the filter cuts down the light quite a bit so it took a 3 minute exposure to capture the detail. The camera was a Phase One IQ4150 on a Cambo body with a Canon EOS mount which made it easy to attach to the telescope (a SkyWatcher 8 inch Newtonian). This is actually three frames stacked to reduce noise.

I also included an unprocessed frame for comparison. You can see the light pollution filter added a very strong blue/cyan color cast. I've found that Capture One is the best tool to process the RAW files, whether from the IQ4150 or my Sony a7r2. Lightroom seems to make a mess of the files as you try to neutralize the color. You can also see in the RAW that there is an extreme dynamic range in the nebula and most photos use some form of HDR processing to capture detail in the bright central core as well as the more faint dust lanes. The IQ4150 did an admirable job of capturing all of the range in a single exposure.

One lesson I learned the hard way. I started the back taking 3 minute exposures using an intervallomter and went to bed, but the power management was set to turn the back off after 15 minutes. Apparently it doesn't count exposures taken with a remote as activity and it turned off after only capturing 3 frames. I'll know better next time.
Remarkable and astonishing, Craig. Mightily impressed!
 
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