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anyone

Well-known member
This is unrelated to the current conversation, but can anyone speak to the battery life on the 907x 100c and how it compares to the prior model? One of the knocks on the 50c was lackluster battery life.
I'd be interested in that matter as well. Does anyone already have experience?
 

Steve Hendrix

Well-known member
We haven't done any testing yet, but I would be surprised if there was any positive change to the battery life for the CFV 100c vs the CFV 50c. And technically precise battery testing is difficult ( though not impossible).


Steve Hendrix/CI
 

usm

Active member
Any raws out there to share? Is it already supported in Phocus or are we waiting for an update?
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I'm not sure how to quantify the 907x/CFVII 50c battery life as "lackluster". How is it being measured?

Mine seems to be "good" to "very good" overall, on par with what i get when using the Leica M10-M/-R in similar ways, all three far better than what i was getting out of the Leica CL. Based on what i have been getting as use per charge, I have three batteries for the M10-M/-R, and three for the CFVIi 50C. For the CL, I had six batteries...

G
 

Jager

Member
I can only speak empirically to battery life on the 907x/CFV-100c, as I'm not into formal camera testing. But I've shot pretty much every day with it and all I can say is that considering its "viewfinder" is a good-sized LCD screen the battery life seems terrific. It seems quite efficient. I'm glad I bought a spare battery when I ordered the camera and back, but I've taken to leaving it at home on most of my mini adventures.

That said, the context for me is pretty selective shooting. I shoot digital with essentially the same tempo I shot (shoot) film. And slower still with medium format.
 

GeorgeBo

Well-known member
Just received mine from CI today! Thanks Chris ;)
So of course lunch was spent unpacking, charging and looking at the changes. This shot is definitely not trying to represent what the camera can do, but thought I would just post here anyway. When traveling I use my iPad Pro primarily so wanted to make sure I was able to use it before heading out this weekend. The shot below was with the back on my 501CM and CFE 80mm 2.8. Handheld even.

A few things I really like... Being able to add lens information to the EXIF when previewing the capture on the back. Can assign lens model, shooting aperture and distance. Having this information allows you to display the correct lens name in Phocus Mobile 2 frame instead of "unknown lens" or whatever it used to display. Small thing yes, but I like to use it for certain situations. Plus now having that information in EXIF will be handy for archive and post processing. I just wish it was more granular to be able to select the actual body model vs. just 500 (501CM for example).

The other little thing that I really like seeing was the redesign of the buttons. The power button is recessed (thank you!) and all the buttons seem to be made of a harder material than those of the CFV II 50C. So hopefully the issue of the button coating wearing off is a thing of the past on this model.

Will be testing with the Cambo Actus over the next few weeks, but this weekend will be with XCD and 501CM and V lenses :)

George

CFV 100C/501CM CFE 80mm ISO3200 | f/2.8 | 1/125
Grayscale conversion in Phocus Mobile 2
IMG_0043.jpeg
 
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jng

Well-known member
A few things I really like... Being able to add lens information to the EXIF when previewing the capture on the back. Can assign lens model, shooting aperture and distance. Having this information allows you to display the correct lens name in Phocus Mobile 2 frame instead of "unknown lens" or whatever it used to display. Small thing yes, but I like to use it for certain situations. Plus now having that information in EXIF will be handy for archive and post processing. I just wish it was more granular to be able to select the actual body model vs. just 500 (501CM for example).
The ability to enter lens information via the back is a nice touch for keeping track of things, not to mention easier and less error prone implementation of lens profiles in Phocus. If only one could do this on the IQ4…

John
 

FloatingLens

Well-known member
The ability to enter lens information via the back is a nice touch for keeping track of things, not to mention easier and less error prone implementation of lens profiles in Phocus.
Wow! Complete news to me. That feature is awesome!
 

rdeloe

Well-known member
The ability to enter lens information via the back is a nice touch for keeping track of things, not to mention easier and less error prone implementation of lens profiles in Phocus. If only one could do this on the IQ4…

John
I read the manual about this feature but it's not clear to me if the lens information is added automatically (if you select the lens you're using in advance), or if you have to add it when you display the picture in camera. It looks like the latter, but I can't tell for sure. Can you explain how it works? On my GFX 100S, I can have up to 6 lenses stored. If I remember to choose the correct one, the lens info is written into EXIF automatically.
 

GeorgeBo

Well-known member
Rob you add it after you shoot the image and viewing it on the back. The back has a long list of Hasselblad lenses but you can check off the ones you actually have to narrow the list down. While viewing you can add the lens, aperture and focus distance. If you are not using a Hasselblad lens, you can select "Other" and enter aperture, focus distance and focal length. Just not a custom model lens name i.e. an adapted Pentax.

I read the manual about this feature but it's not clear to me if the lens information is added automatically (if you select the lens you're using in advance), or if you have to add it when you display the picture in camera. It looks like the latter, but I can't tell for sure. Can you explain how it works? On my GFX 100S, I can have up to 6 lenses stored. If I remember to choose the correct one, the lens info is written into EXIF automatically.
 

diggles

Well-known member
I read the manual about this feature but it's not clear to me if the lens information is added automatically (if you select the lens you're using in advance), or if you have to add it when you display the picture in camera. It looks like the latter, but I can't tell for sure. Can you explain how it works? On my GFX 100S, I can have up to 6 lenses stored. If I remember to choose the correct one, the lens info is written into EXIF automatically.
Before today, I didn't even know this was an option. These are the same questions I had. What I've figured out so far is that when you are displaying a picture on the camera there is a little lens icon on the screen. If the body does not recognize the lens you are using there is a question mark in the icon. Click the icon to open the lens information screen.

If you are using a Hasselblad lens then you have a list of lenses you can choose from. If you are not, then your only option is 'Other'. When you click it then you can enter your focal length, fstop, and shooting distance. Then you click a button to confirm.

When you take another image the lens icon has a question mark in it so you have to choose your lens again. When you open the lens information screen the previous settings are still selected so you just have to confirm.

This is a great step in the right direction, but I would like the option to store multiple 'Other' lenses.

I like Fuji's approach, but there have been many occasions when I left the wrong lens selected so the wrong information is written to the Exif data. With Hasselblad's approach it appears that you have to confirm the settings before it is written to Exif. This may be better, for me anyway.
 

Steve Hendrix

Well-known member
Again, precise battery testing is difficult. Are you using the same battery in the same conditional state, are the batteries new, are they used, making the cameras as similar as reasonably possible with regard to the active modes they're in, turning the energy settings off, etc. Are you going to just let them sit for an extended period of time or try to shoot a bunch with them, and then, can you easily shoot exactly the same, and ... yada yada yada.

So, just a quick test today, I just turned as much energy savings off as I could, had both in Electronic Shutter Mode, turned them on and left them. I was way too busy today to do a bunch of shooting with them. Now the battery on the right I did not have percent on, but I noticed even though both batteries were showing charged fully on the Hasselblad Dual Charger, that the battery for the CFV 100c when inserted showed 96%. The battery for the CFV 50c showed full, but I didn't have the percentage turned on. I have to consider they were likely pretty close.

At any rate, at 2:30 pm, I started my test. At 6:20pm, the CFV 100c showed 80% remaining, the CFV 50c showed 72% remaining. Now it's possible, but not likely, that the fully charged battery in the CFV 50c started out less capacity than the 96% of the CFV 100c battery, but I doubt that. Also, these are used batteries, they could be at different "life strengths". But if anything, I would have to - pleasingly and surprisingly - presume at this point that the battery performance of the CFV 100c is no worse, and potentially slightly better than the CFV 50c.

Oh, did I mention that - unlike almost everywhere else, even BH, even HassyDirect - we actually have these in stock, on our shelf?

https://digitalback.com/collections/hasselblad-v-system/products/hasselblad-907x-cfv-100c


Steve Hendrix/CI
 

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anwarp

Well-known member
Stacking the images after capturing them all would be way too memory and data intensive. The images can be averaged very simply as each frame is captured. Simple per pixel, but there are a lot of pixels. The hardware implementation might be clever.
Actually, with all the discussions about processing raw and tiff- I expect there will be a difference between averaging pre and post “demosaicing”.
In which case it could be a feature any RAW processor could add very easily, similar to HDR.
 
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Massive Si

Active member
I mean, how hard can it be?
Tech cam users still have to remember to write down shift values, on scraps of paper on a windswept mountain, and hope they can be matched again back home at processing time
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
Actually, with all the discussions about processing raw and tiff- I expect there will be a difference between averaging pre and post “demosaicing”.
In which case it could be a feature any RAW processor could add very easily, similar to HDR.
The problem is keeping all the RAW files around. Sure, you can take 100 images and average them in post. That's 20 GB of card storage for one final shot. Is that a problem? It's up to the user. I would rather not do it.
 

anwarp

Well-known member
The problem is keeping all the RAW files around. Sure, you can take 100 images and average them in post. That's 20 GB of card storage for one final shot. Is that a problem? It's up to the user. I would rather not do it.
I agree completely with you about the raw files.

The frame averaging was the one feature that convinced me to upgrade my IQ3 100!
 
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