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JLM L-plate for A7/R

jlm

Workshop Member
a two part design, the L-plate bolted to the base. to get more port access, slide the entire unit over by loosening the clamp bolt.
port doors can be opened in either spot.
battery access only in normal location

the design has a fairly large cavity in the base, making it light. should any shutter vibration forensic detectives want more mass, i can offer a steel insert, filling the cavity and adding some mass ;)

material is black anodized aluminum, finely machined and finished and will fit arca and RRS clamps in landscape and portrait orientation.
these will sell for $150
 

ferrellmc

New member
If the arca base plate interferes with the cables when inserted through the L-plate (portrait) why not make a second plate that is longer so the cable can get by. Sell this as an accessory. Or place another hole (you may have one already there) to bolt the camera to the base further from the L-plate to allow cables to fit. I connect cables infrequently so I would just keep the base plate mounted and tilt the camera on the ball head, the old fashion way.

I'm not sure what the purpose of the design extending around the battery compartment is for. Why not end it just before the hinge in the door? Perhaps more stable when placing the camera on the table.

I think the base plate mount surface should be longer. It can easily be part of the design. It's not unusual to attach the camera in the dark and miss the center position.

If the connection of the L-plate to the base plate were more under the camera then metal won't stick out when the L-plate is not used. That will require thicker stock for the L Plate to begin the machining.
 

k-hawinkler

Active member
I would like a design where the distance from the L-plate to the lens is the same in landscape and portrait orientation so that I can attach the L-plate to the same rail in both positions. TIA.
 

jlm

Workshop Member
i have made many hundreds of base plates (with grips and L-plates) people want to have a stable full length base, they want the L-plate to be close to the camera and they don't want misc extra parts. generally they want it light and a small proportion want to access the cables in portrait mode.
the primary function of an L-plate is to allow quick change clamps to grip your camera in either portrait of landscape without having to rotate the head, shifting the lens position. i have sold many bases without the L-plate to those who simply want the arca style grooves

the L-plate grip is farther from the lens center than the landscape grip due to the rectangular shape of the camera. the base would have to be quite thick to make them equal. as it is, the base is 1/2" thick to allow the LCD maximum articulation
 

ferrellmc

New member
What is the purpose of the 2 cuts in the base plate at the clamp, each maybe about 1/16".

There are two holes in the base plate on each side of the 1/4 -20 mount bolt, are they alternative mounts?

There are 2 holes in the L-plate, what are they for? The one in the base looks threaded.

Thank you.
 

hcubell

Active member
a two part design, the L-plate bolted to the base. to get more port access, slide the entire unit over by loosening the clamp bolt.
port doors can be opened in either spot.
battery access only in normal location

the design has a fairly large cavity in the base, making it light. should any shutter vibration forensic detectives want more mass, i can offer a steel insert, filling the cavity and adding some mass ;)

material is black anodized aluminum, finely machined and finished and will fit arca and RRS clamps in landscape and portrait orientation.
these will sell for $150
If you are out in the marketplace trying to sell a product, it is generally best not to insult your potential customers, i.e., photographers who are concerned about maximizing image sharpness and those that shoot verticals.
 

Jeff Kott

New member
If you are out in the marketplace trying to sell a product, it is generally best not to insult your potential customers, i.e., photographers who are concerned about maximizing image sharpness and those that shoot verticals.
FWIW, I think this comment is an over reaction. It's clear that Jim feels most customers prefer to keep the weight down on their L plates, but for those that want more mass he can make the plate heavier. I think that kind of flexibility should be applauded and he made the comment in a humorous way and added a smiley face to boot. Anyone who takes offense at that is too thin skinned IMHO.
 

nikonf

New member
Has anyone ever looked into using an anti-resonant compound in the base of the L-Plate, similar to the material used in Audio component cones and feet? Just wondering if this would help. I am not an engineer.
Respectfully,
Mike
FWIW, I think this comment is an over reaction. It's clear that Jim feels most customers prefer to keep the weight down on their L plates, but for those that want more mass he can make the plate heavier. I think that kind of flexibility should be applauded and he made the comment in a humorous way and added a smiley face to boot. Anyone who takes offense at that is too thin skinned IMHO.
 

mjm6

New member
Has anyone ever looked into using an anti-resonant compound in the base of the L-Plate, similar to the material used in Audio component cones and feet? Just wondering if this would help. I am not an engineer.
Respectfully,
Mike
First, you have to decide if you want to 'couple' or 'de-couple'. Since the audio industry can't decide, it would be hard to be definitive about this.

On the other hand, the audio industry has made an entire realm out of folklore and mysticism, so why not get that going in here, too? I personally have produced photos with much higher fidelity and clarity, and a more stable and distinct focus when I have had Shun Mook dots taped to the body. Three wasn't enough, though. I needed at least four evenly distributed to produce a pleasing effect.

In all seriousness, this shutter slap effect is not resonance, so I don't think any of these approaches will be useful.

Mass and adequate support stability will address it. I have yet to see a person with a well-mounted camera that will suffer much from the shutter. K-H is doing some pretty extreme tests and the slap is visible, but I believe that there are ways to address this for the very long focal lengths that he was testing.

---Michael
 

k-hawinkler

Active member
First, you have to decide if you want to 'couple' or 'de-couple'. Since the audio industry can't decide, it would be hard to be definitive about this.

On the other hand, the audio industry has made an entire realm out of folklore and mysticism, so why not get that going in here, too? I personally have produced photos with much higher fidelity and clarity, and a more stable and distinct focus when I have had Shun Mook dots taped to the body. Three wasn't enough, though. I needed at least four evenly distributed to produce a pleasing effect.

In all seriousness, this shutter slap effect is not resonance, so I don't think any of these approaches will be useful.

Mass and adequate support stability will address it. I have yet to see a person with a well-mounted camera that will suffer much from the shutter. K-H is doing some pretty extreme tests and the slap is visible, but I believe that there are ways to address this for the very long focal lengths that he was testing.

---Michael

Thanks Michael.

I believe in landscape orientation I now can avoid shutter shake by attaching firmly both lens and camera proper to a rail that is firmly attached to a solid tripod. Demonstrated here http://www.getdpi.com/forum/558875-post139.html. So, coupling the camera to the mass of lens, ballhead, and tripod is my answer. ;)

Of course, out there one still has to avoid wind gusts which isn't always possible.

Once I have my RRS L-plate I will see whether this approach can also be made to work in portrait orientation.

BTW, I also now have an aluminum tripod so that I can use my long lens support attachment you suggested without cracking the legs of my carbon fiber tripod. If necessary I will use the attachment, but it's rather tedious.
 

mjm6

New member
K-H,

I have a CF tripod (Gitzo), and never had an issue with the leg being clamped with the long lens support. They are a lot more rugged than they appear, and you really don't have to clamp the LL support too much to get the full effect. Just enough to hold it in place. Think 'precision instrument' rather than 'tire iron'. Hahaha...

If I recall, the LL support has rubber on the clamp? Just enough to get the LL support to hold on the leg should be sufficient.

You could also clamp at the collar if you are worried about the CF tube being crushed.


---Michael
 

k-hawinkler

Active member
Thanks again Michael. Understood.
The aluminum tripod is also twice as heavy as my carbon fiber tripod.
So, if the long lens support is necessary I would use the heavier aluminum tripod anyway.
I am the kind of guy who prefers an extra safety and stability margin. :D
 

jlm

Workshop Member
couple of things:

i have no idea why hcubel felt i was insulting anyone, certainly not my intention. there have been several suggestions that perhaps the most endearing feature of the A7/A7R is the light weight and small size and i can endorse that.

those extra holes are fixturing points for machining and anodizing
and the little slots indicate the lens centerline (will be on the L-plate as well).

i avoided adding tripod holes, problematic in this design, since the point is to offer an L-plate; the main function being quick change from portrait to landscape and more or less assuming a clamping plate, not a screw.

finally, i tend to keep one of these on my camera all the time if i am using a tripod for even 25% of the time. the base has to feel good in the hand; so it is full length, smooth and rounded and even the L-plate is a gripping assist


re tripods: a while back on this forum there was some testing of vibration of aluminum, wood and CF tripods; guess which came out on top?

JLM Milich Advanced Camera Parts
 

jlm

Workshop Member
i should point out that i develop these camera parts when i see a need. i come at the design from the point of view of an active photographer, industrial designer, instrument maker and machinist with a quite sophisticated shop.
what i can offer as well is to gather opinion and update the design, so i encourage input
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Looks nice! It's good to see quality work, and something besides just RRS on the market.

I have their L-plate for the E-M1. It's a nice piece. I sometimes remove the vertical L, set the camera for square format, and just leave it on ... It adds just enough height to the body to make it more secure with a heavy lens.

But I get tired of sending only them my money ... ;-)

G
 

k-hawinkler

Active member
couple of things:

i have no idea why hcubel felt i was insulting anyone, certainly not my intention. there have been several suggestions that perhaps the most endearing feature of the A7/A7R is the light weight and small size and i can endorse that.

those extra holes are fixturing points for machining and anodizing
and the little slots indicate the lens centerline (will be on the L-plate as well).

i avoided adding tripod holes, problematic in this design, since the point is to offer an L-plate; the main function being quick change from portrait to landscape and more or less assuming a clamping plate, not a screw.

finally, i tend to keep one of these on my camera all the time if i am using a tripod for even 25% of the time. the base has to feel good in the hand; so it is full length, smooth and rounded and even the L-plate is a gripping assist


re tripods: a while back on this forum there was some testing of vibration of aluminum, wood and CF tripods; guess which came out on top?

JLM Milich Advanced Camera Parts

Thanks Jim,

Oh good, then I should be covered, having a

• Gitzo GT3541XLS Systematic 6X Carbon Fiber Tripod, an
• Induro Alloy 8M Tripod AT-413, the
• RRS BH-55 PCPRO: Full-sized ballhead with PC-PRO clamp, and the
• Manfrotto 359 Long Lens Support.

Hopefully my RRS A7R L-plate will be among the next batch shipped in a few weeks.
I also would be interested in purchasing your L-plate as described here:

http://www.getdpi.com/forum/561485-post20.html and here
http://www.getdpi.com/forum/561486-post21.html

so that I can compare it to the RRS L-plate.
I looked at your website but couldn't find how to order it.

Please, advise about availability and order info.
Your announced price is $150.
http://www.getdpi.com/forum/561487-post22.html

TIA.
 

nikonf

New member
I think this is a great idea:

finally, i tend to keep one of these on my camera all the time if i am using a tripod for even 25% of the time. the base has to feel good in the hand; so it is full length, smooth and rounded and even the L-plate is a gripping assist



http://www.getdpi.com/forum/sony/49769-jlm-l-plate-a7-r.html#post561656
couple of things:

i have no idea why hcubel felt i was insulting anyone, certainly not my intention. there have been several suggestions that perhaps the most endearing feature of the A7/A7R is the light weight and small size and i can endorse that.

those extra holes are fixturing points for machining and anodizing
and the little slots indicate the lens centerline (will be on the L-plate as well).

i avoided adding tripod holes, problematic in this design, since the point is to offer an L-plate; the main function being quick change from portrait to landscape and more or less assuming a clamping plate, not a screw.

finally, i tend to keep one of these on my camera all the time if i am using a tripod for even 25% of the time. the base has to feel good in the hand; so it is full length, smooth and rounded and even the L-plate is a gripping assist


re tripods: a while back on this forum there was some testing of vibration of aluminum, wood and CF tripods; guess which came out on top?

JLM Milich Advanced Camera Parts
 

Vulture

New member
Jim, I would be interested in this plate. I have an order into RRS but could cancel I assume since it is on back order. The one thing I want is a slot for mounting a leash/strap. I've grown accustomed to leaving the tripod plate on as you suggest and therefore get camera specific plates, and also use Peak Design leashes and cuffs. One of the common attachment points is either the tripod hole or a slot on the plate.
Have you given any thought to this possible mod?
Both the RRS and the Markin have this feature.
 
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