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E-M1, E-M5, E-M5.2, etc. ... Peculiarities

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
As I understand it, that applies to the movie/video image stabilization setting.
It’s one of the options. :grin:
That's correct, and it also introduces a slight crop to the video format, so that it has some space to move around in. There's actually also a fourth type of stabilisation available, also electronic and also for video, and that's electronic image stabilisation (EIS) in post production, which crops the video a little bit more.
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
That's correct, and it also introduces a slight crop to the video format, so that it has some space to move around in. There's actually also a fourth type of stabilisation available, also electronic and also for video, and that's electronic image stabilisation (EIS) in post production, which crops the video a little bit more.
Many thanks Jorgen, much appreciated. :salute:
 

Knorp

Well-known member
That's correct, and it also introduces a slight crop to the video format, so that it has some space to move around in. There's actually also a fourth type of stabilisation available, also electronic and also for video, and that's electronic image stabilisation (EIS) in post production, which crops the video a little bit more.
No not four ... :shocked:
It’s electronic OR digital image stabilization, right ?
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
No not four ... :shocked:
It’s electronic OR digital image stabilization, right ?
Well Bart, in combined camera/lens there are 3.
However Jorgen pointed to a fourth technique used in video post production, no? Maybe we can ask Jorgen to provide more context and detail.
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
Well Bart, in combined camera/lens there are 3.
However Jorgen pointed to a fourth technique used in video post production, no? Maybe we can ask Jorgen to provide more context and detail.
Correct, and here's a guy who explains it much better than I would to. He uses DaVinci Resolve 16 from Blackmagic, a very good and fully functional video editing program that is free unless one needs the Studio version. There are also dedicated stabilisation apps around, some of them are free too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0wh5zZXgvw

https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/uk/products/davinciresolve/
 

Knorp

Well-known member
Correct, and here's a guy who explains it much better than I would to. He uses DaVinci Resolve 16 from Blackmagic, a very good and fully functional video editing program that is free unless one needs the Studio version. There are also dedicated stabilisation apps around, some of them are free too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0wh5zZXgvw

https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/uk/products/davinciresolve/
This is a PP software-thingy alright, undoubtedly very useful but still ... :sleep:
I'll stick to my 'hardware' settings for lens, stills and, something I never use, the m-word ... :grin:

But thank you for pointing this out and providing the links, Jørgen !

Best regards.
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member
This is a PP software-thingy alright, undoubtedly very useful but still ... :sleep:
I'll stick to my 'hardware' settings for lens, stills and, something I never use, the m-word ... :grin:

But thank you for pointing this out and providing the links, Jørgen !

Best regards.
It's important also to point out that video is a totaly different animal from stills. Getting the footage is important, but it's with the editing the real work starts, and timewise, we often talk about multiples of the actual filming.
 

k-hawinkler

Well-known member
NSIDE Image Stabilization:
Olympus takes us on a geek’s tour of what makes IS work

by Dave Etchells posted Wednesday, July 29, 2020 at 6:49 PM EDT
https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2020/07/29/inside-image-stabilization-a-geeks-tour-of-how-it-works-with-olympus

Lots of detail. :clap:

For starters, quote:

" Image Stabilization: The Basics

There are two main types of image stabilization: in-body image stabilization (often abbreviated to IBIS) or optical image stabilization (aka in-lens or lens-based IS). Each works to correct the fundamental problem caused by camera shake -- the image projected by the lens moving across the sensor surface during exposure. (There's also something called electronic or digital image stabilization, based on simply shifting the location of data readout on the face of the sensor. Electronic image stabilization can introduce motion artifacts that IBIS and lens-based IS avoids.)"

I think I have to pay more attention to his last point and maybe switch off electronic or digital image stabilization in my Olympus cameras for certain scenarios? :facesmack:


Well, reflecting on why I bought my first modern MFT camera, the Olympus OM-D E-M5, was its 5-axis IBIS and sensor IQ that finally was up to snuff. I had gotten the inferior Olympus E-P2 with attachable EVF before that to gain some experience with the EVF to be used on a Leica M camera that in the end I never acquired. :LOL:

The above referenced article by Dave Etchells is really a tour de force covering Olympus' entire image stabilization efforts from its beginnings until now. Olympus' engineering and manufacturing accomplishments in this area are truly stunning. Arthur C. Clarke comes to mind who pointed out “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” I would like to suggest that statement also ought to be applied here.

Industrial development of MEMS, i.e. Micro Electro Mechanical Systems, has made this feat possible. Olympus and their component supplier made decisive contributions in this area and integrated those components into their cameras and lenses, especially into their latest ones with IBIS, Lens, and Sync stabilization.

There has never been any doubt in my mind about the quality of Olympus' SHG FT and PRO MFT lenses. Without question all of them technically outstanding. I am happy with my decision to add the E-M1 Mark III to my E-M1 Mark II and my E-M1 cameras. I clearly can see the progress in their User Interface as well, a welcome development.

The Olympus Workspace app contributes unique capabilities to my toolset. I used it also to import and export the following images, shot with the E-M1 Mark III.

Soothing Smoothness.


Olympus E-M1MarkIII + M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm F2.8 Pro + MC-20 @ 240 mm (480 mm in 35mm), f/5.6, 1/100 s, ISO 6400.

Excellent noise reduction.


Olympus E-M1MarkIII + M.Zuiko Digital ED 300mm F4.0 IS Pro + MC-20 @ 600 mm (1200 mm in 35mm), f/8, 1/320 s, ISO 6400.

Impressed that C-AF found a focus point.


Olympus E-M1MarkIII + M.Zuiko Digital ED 300mm F4.0 IS Pro + MC-20 @ 600 mm (1200 mm in 35mm), f/8, 1/320 s, ISO 250.
 
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k-hawinkler

Well-known member
Red Ants



Olympus E-M1MarkII + OLYMPUS 300mm F2.8 SHG Lens + EC-20 @ 600 mm (1,200 mm in 35mm), f/8, 1/250 s, ISO 2,500, Date Taken 2017-04-23 19:20:36.

They changed Smugmug's UI quite a bit. :facesmack:
I have to get used to that. Oh well. :LOL: :grin:
It's still buggy though. :thumbdown:
 

Jorgen Udvang

Subscriber Member

Interesting if used in an Olympus camera (or whatever the new name is).
Seems like an obvious sensor for an E-M1X II. G9 II? It won't be able to output the 5.7K that Panasonic has claimed for the GH6, but maybe they have ordered a larger, multi aspect ratio version of the same sensor?
 
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