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Fun with Medium Format FILM Images!

gurtch

Well-known member
Thank you Dave GT. The negatives make beautiful large prints. The local Foundation of the Arts invited me to do a two man show with prints of my work hanging next to my father's. It took me a year and a half to print, mount, mat and frame the show. My work included 20"x30" prints, and most of my father's I printed 11x14", some 16"x20" and one 20"x30". The big prints from the Super Ikonta camera with Zeiss lens were awe inspiring with their quality.
Dave
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
amazing. Thanks for sharing.

Don't know if this qualifies or not. My father died in May 1940 at age 29, when I was three. His negatives were lost for 72 years, then found by a complete stranger in mint condition, stored in the dark at ambient temperature, and safely returned to me. Here is a 2 minute slide show on YouTube, the camera was a Zeiss Super Ikonta "A" with 70mm Tessar, Compur Rapid shutter. I no longer have my darkroom (I am 85) but I scanned the negatives with a Nikon 8000 Coolscan. There are about 250 rolls of film individually stored in glassine envelopes. I transferred them all into archival clear negative sleeves, and used my flat bed to "contact print" each roll of film on 8.5"x11" paper. I have each roll of film stored in a three ring binder with the corresponding roll of film (just like the old days). Merry Christmas, and I hope you enjoy the two minute tribute to my Dad.
Dave in NJ
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Well, taking a break from the usual chaos…:)

The last of my medium format film cameras, the Ciro-Flex TLR is ready to load after checking shutter speed, focus, aperture dial, etc.

It is an old lower priced/lower quality camera than I have ever used and the Rolleiflex TLR I had was 10 times better quality. The screen is very dull making indoor focusing extremely frustrating.

OK, so it is a less than exciting experience. But who doesn’t like a photographic challenge?:)

Once I decide what, where and when to shoot, I will load the CF with Acros II 120 film. I have no great expectations, just a curiousity how the images will turn out.

Time will tell!:)
 

dave.gt

Well-known member
Well, taking a break from the usual chaos…:)

The last of my medium format film cameras, the Ciro-Flex TLR is ready to load after checking shutter speed, focus, aperture dial, etc.

It is an old lower priced/lower quality camera than I have ever used and the Rolleiflex TLR I had was 10 times better quality. The screen is very dull making indoor focusing extremely frustrating.

OK, so it is a less than exciting experience. But who doesn’t like a photographic challenge?:)

Once I decide what, where and when to shoot, I will load the CF with Acros II 120 film. I have no great expectations, just a curiousity how the images will turn out.

Time will tell!:)
The TLR is loaded… somehow I feel like my old MGTD was a modern machine compared to this camera which feels closer to the Ford Model T! LOL…

The weather is warming up here so I may take it downtown in a day or two for a walkabout. Sunny 16 rules!:):):)
 

lookbook

Well-known member
Now that is an interesting setup. How do you use it? Can you use the shutter? And how does a Fisheye do with movements?

Edit: and I love those small Ebony cameras. Beautiful pieces of craftmanship.
... it's been maybe 15 years since I owned the camera for a short time.
I thought it was super nice too, but I always found Linhof more practical for me.

I always had good contacts with a technician at Linhof who was able to take care of special requests for me.
For example, he attached the shutter of a bellows unit to the lens plate.

Viewed on the focusing screen with the shutter cocked and open.
shutter closed, cassette attached, slider pulled and released. -
It may sound complicated, but it's quick.
 

anyone

Well-known member
I always had good contacts with a technician at Linhof who was able to take care of special requests for me.
For example, he attached the shutter of a bellows unit to the lens plate.
Really cool adaptation! However, my limited experiences with V lenses shifted on a Flexbody were not all that positive - I ran out of image circle almost all the time.
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
earlier this year, I visited the historic site of Malacca in Malaysia. I took a photograph of this gentleman, who runs a very old goldsmith shop in the middle of town. Very dark shop. Hand held with Mamiya RB67 ProSD with Santa 1000 film, exposed at ISO 1000, processed at box speed with Ilford ID-11 for 15mins. Scanned with GFX 50S II with 18mm extension on a Lomography DigitaLiza. BTW, the Santa 1000 film has an extremely thin acetate base, making it quite difficult to load into my Patterson reel.


melaka0uncle.jpg
 
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anyone

Well-known member
earlier this year, I visited the historic site in Malaysia in Malacca. I took a photograph of this gentleman, who runs a very old goldsmith shop in the middle of town. Very dark shop. Hand held with Mamiya RB67 ProSD with Santa 1000 film, exposed at ISO 1000, processed at box speed with Ilford ID-11 for 15mins. Scanned with GFX 50S II with 18mm extension on a Lomography DigitaLiza. BTW, the Santa 1000 film has an extremely thin acetate base, making it quite difficult to load into my Patterson reel.
Exciting to see a Santa film in the real world. I just ordered 30 rolls of their Santa 100 color negative film and am quite curious about the results. I discovered them recently when I checked current color film prices since I'm running out of 135-36 film. Fuji's price increase is incredible (sky high), as is the availability (none).
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
I wouldn’t buy another roll of Santa though. The scratches made during loading into the reel is apparent, though it increases the nostalgia factor. And it’s not that cheap either, at least not here in Singapore. I would rather shoot Shanghai GP3, though that’s an ISO 100 film. I have processed a roll of 35mm Santa which I have lying around somewhere, that’s even more difficult to reel as the film is longer, and has more opportunity to snag somewhere along the guide grooves of the Patterson reel.
 
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anyone

Well-known member
Since I gave up on color processing myself I'm saved from that headache, although a thin base can also cause trouble for scanning. But as the order is already on its way I'll find out sooner or later.
 

MartinN

Well-known member
I NEVER again load a slightly wet Paterson reel. That condition is simply no-no. Now I have enough reels so I can always pick a completely dry one. My experince with thin sheet film is with the MOD54 and there minimum or no agitation should be done, othervise the sheets may get loose and stick to tank wall.
 

MartinN

Well-known member
Then I have some Ilford hardener for soft emulsion, but has not tested that thoroughly. But thin base (and thin emulsion) is the new high-res analog back ! Without those you can't get dpi :) (extraordinary).
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
I loaded the Santa on dry reels. It’s so thin it tends to bunch up and get stuck going into the wrong grooves of the reel. For 4x5 I ordered some Stearman SP-445 tanks. See how that goes. I will be attempting to do E6 and C41. Wish me luck.
 
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