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Fun with MF images - ARCHIVED - FOR VIEWING ONLY

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diggles

Well-known member
I'm not sure if this counts as fun, but here is an image for a client from last week. They're cleaning railcars with a hydrovac.

It's the first time I tried using the tech camera on a industrial/construction shoot–that was the fun part for me :) I was worried it would be too slow to shoot with, since I normally use 35mm for this kind of stuff, but it worked out pretty well.

Cambo WRS 1600, Hasselblad CFV II 50c, Rodenstock 50HR

_HBLD-2312.jpg
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
I'm not sure if this counts as fun, but here is an image for a client from last week. They're cleaning railcars with a hydrovac.

It's the first time I tried using the tech camera on a industrial/construction shoot–that was the fun part for me :) I was worried it would be too slow to shoot with, since I normally use 35mm for this kind of stuff, but it worked out pretty well.

Cambo WRS 1600, Hasselblad CFV II 50c, Rodenstock 50HR

View attachment 180978
Warren, how do you like your Rodenstock 50HR, that is the next lens on my list.
 

Joe Colson

Well-known member
Last catchup post for now.

Like many of you stuck in low gear, I was dumpster diving last week into the year 2008 and came up with this one. A pleasant surprise for sure.

P45+, Cambo with 72mm XL lens:

Wow! Great image. If that's from your dumpster, then you need to take a daily dive.

Joe
 

diggles

Well-known member
Warren, how do you like your Rodenstock 50HR, that is the next lens on my list.
Hey Greg,

It's a fantastic lens in my opinion. It pairs well with the 32HR in terms of comparable sharpness and rendering quality. I remember seeing a comment from Doug Peterson of DT Commercial Photo saying the 50HR is one of the best.

For me it is about a 40mm, in 35mm terms, since I am shooting on the 33x44 sensor. Before I started down the medium format rabbit hole I used the 45 t/s on a Canon quite a bit for interiors and the 50HR is meant to be its replacement.

The only time I feel the need to use the CF with it is when I have large shifts, like this 3 shot stitch. If my memory serves me correctly, this image was taken with 7mm camera fall and about -15mm, 0, 15mm shift.

_HBLD-0821-0827.jpg
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Hey Greg,

It's a fantastic lens in my opinion. It pairs well with the 32HR in terms of comparable sharpness and rendering quality. I remember seeing a comment from Doug Peterson of DT Commercial Photo saying the 50HR is one of the best.

For me it is about a 40mm, in 35mm terms, since I am shooting on the 33x44 sensor. Before I started down the medium format rabbit hole I used the 45 t/s on a Canon quite a bit for interiors and the 50HR is meant to be its replacement.

The only time I feel the need to use the CF with it is when I have large shifts, like this 3 shot stitch. If my memory serves me correctly, this image was taken with 7mm camera fall and about -15mm, 0, 15mm shift.

View attachment 180980
Thank you Warren, beautiful example of it in use!
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Generally it is such a pain for me to clean up my Lightroom catalog and see what I think no longer deserves to be in there, but occasional I run across a file like this that lifts my spirit. This is my youngest daughter patiently waiting for me to finish, my daughters are the only ones who would endure this!

Hasselblad H6D HC150mm

2019_01 untitled shoot-12-Edit.jpg
 

Kinya28

Well-known member
Bawling Ball Beach, Point Arena, CA

My first visit to this photogenic beach.
I wasn't sure about optimum tide level but it was quite good. I found optimum tide level as somewhere between +1' (third image) and +3' (second image). Fortunate that I could get a beautiful clouds.

PhaseOne IQ4-150/ Cambo WRS-1600/ SK120mm/ HR40mm/ Frame averaged 60sec, shifted, tilted, and focus stacked.



P0001749-m.jpgP0001735m IG.jpgP0001767m2-16x9.jpgP0001780m IG.jpg
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
Bawling Ball Beach, Point Arena, CA

My first visit to this photogenic beach.
I wasn't sure about optimum tide level but it was quite good. I found optimum tide level as somewhere between +1' (third image) and +3' (second image). Fortunate that I could get a beautiful clouds.

PhaseOne IQ4-150/ Cambo WRS-1600/ SK120mm/ HR40mm/ Frame averaged 60sec, shifted, tilted, and focus stacked.

Beautiful images, thanks for sharing!
Beautiful images, thanks for sharing!
 

docholliday

Active member
Generally it is such a pain for me to clean up my Lightroom catalog and see what I think no longer deserves to be in there, but occasional I run across a file like this that lifts my spirit. This is my youngest daughter patiently waiting for me to finish, my daughters are the only ones who would endure this!

Hasselblad H6D HC150mm

View attachment 181000
There's just something about the H cameras and portraits, especially with the 150. The only more dimensional lens is the 210, but I haven't found any of the MF "portrait" lenses to have the same effect. There's a reason I'm still shooting all H bodies and glass...
 

Greg Haag

Well-known member
There's just something about the H cameras and portraits, especially with the 150. The only more dimensional lens is the 210, but I haven't found any of the MF "portrait" lenses to have the same effect. There's a reason I'm still shooting all H bodies and glass...
I have since sold my H6D, but still have my H4D-40, I have never had a camera that I thought handled skin tones better right out of camera. I have the 210 as well and it is an excellent lens!
 
I am familiar with that boardwalk and you found a wonderful composition. There are three other lakes near there we scouted last week that I intend to kayak and photograph this spring (as well as Caddo of course). You’re right about the drive, not bad. We also like Black Bayou and Benton Lakes. So many great looks in a small area.
Black Bayou is on my list in the near future, I have to make a work trip to Baton Rouge soon and was hoping to scout it out then. BTW, I love your gallery, I saw it this weekend when we went to Crystal Bridges!
Ed and Greg, love your photographs! I've been wanting to photograph cypress trees for the last few years, but haven't gotten around to it. What suggestions would you have for those traveling from afar to visit these areas (i.e. no kayaks)? Outfitters or guides? Places to stay near Caddo or the other locations? Thanks!
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
For the benefit of those who have not been to Singapore, not all the hawker culture is housed in traditional establishments. Today, I show a food court in a mall. This one is called Tiong Bahru Plaza, and houses many shops, restaurants, a cinema, and an underground train (metro) station.

The food court is (ironically) called Kopi Tiam, which if you remember the last post, is what we call a local coffee shop, but this one is part of a large, public listed company. Situated on the third floor of the mall.

tiongbahru-kopitiam.jpg

It can get pretty crowned during peak meal times. The entire establishment is air conditioned. One can sit at any available table, and patronize any of the stalls. A wide variety of food is sold by the "hawkers".

inside-food-court.jpg

The mall also feature a restaurant "street", which is a wing with restaurants on both sides of a corridoor.

tiongbahru-corridoor.jpg

All photographed with my trusty, vintage Hasselblad H3D-39 with HC 3.5-4.5/50-110 lens. BW and jpeg conversion from raw in Phocus, with touchups in Photoshop. All shot hand held.
 
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Greg Haag

Well-known member
Ed and Greg, love your photographs! I've been wanting to photograph cypress trees for the last few years, but haven't gotten around to it. What suggestions would you have for those traveling from afar to visit these areas (i.e. no kayaks)? Outfitters or guides? Places to stay near Caddo or the other locations? Thanks!
Jacob, Ed is far and away the expert on this, but my first trip to Caddo I stayed at a hotel in Marshall, TX (about 25 min away). I was not aware of it at the time but the park also has cabins and a campground. There is a pier that goes out into the water that provides a variety of shootings options and requires no guide or Kayak.

60C9736E-5611-4C72-AAEA-9C40AA03C42B.jpeg
 

P. Chong

Well-known member
Someone asked me what is a wet market...its just as the name describes. A market with with wet floors...but seriously, these are more like traditional farmer's or fishermen' markets. Similar to Tsujiki Fish Market when it was still operating in the old premises. Here are some photographs to show the mood, feel in one of these markets.

This wet market houses a market with fresh produce, meats and fish on one side, and the ubiquitious hawker centre for cooked food on the other. By now, you would have probably noticed that in Singapore, we are rather obsessed with eating. Its one of the two national passions, the other being shopping. We do love to eat. Here is the Food Centre side entrance to the building at Beo Crescent.

beo-market.jpg

A vegetable vendor. The way the produce is laid out is typical, many times seems to be quite haphazard, though there is a system in the madness.

beo-vegetables.jpg

A fishmonger with fresh fish on one side of the corridoor. The wet floors is visible. It used to be totally wet, almost covered with water, but these days, hygienic concerns force the stallholders to keep it relatively dry.

beo-fishmonger1.jpg

Another fishmonger. Housewifes and domestic helpers pick out the fish they want, either by putting them in a basket, or point to to their selection to the fishmonger. Who will then weigh, and clean the fish (guts, scales, and sometimes even fillet and cut to pieces) for them.

beo-fishmonger2.jpg

Of course eating is never far away. A kopi tiam nearby:

beo-coffeeshop.jpg

And in many of these heartland markets, the mostly elderly gentlemen will pitch their singing birds to each other. A veritable competition. Perhaps worthy of a single post all on its own, but for now, one picture.

birds.jpg

All photographed with the Hasselblad H3D-39 with HCD 4/28mm lens, hand held. BW and raw conversion in Phocus and final touchups in Photoshop.
 

Joe Colson

Well-known member
Peter, your Singapore street scene travelogues have been fascinating. I visited Singapore a few times many years ago on business and truly enjoyed the experiences. The food was delicious, the people friendly, and the city unbelievably clean and organized. I'll admit that I'm sad to see the hawkers and street food sellers consolidated into hawker centers. I understand the reasons, but the Singapore street food experience was one of my favorite memories from those trips.

Thanks for sharing and please continue.

Joe
 
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