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Fun with MF images 2021

scho

Well-known member
Hi
North of Copenhagen there is a deerpark established by the king in 1670, mainly for hunting, for him and his upperclass-friends. But it has always been open for the public, but not for hunting.

The deerpark (in Danish: Dyrehaven) is on the Unesco’s list of world heritage, and it is rather special and unique. Its hard to find a place like this around the world.

There are around 2.000 wild deer here. And the hunters employed by the state shoot around 6-700 deers every year, to keep the amount on a sustainable level. They sell the meat to private people and to restaurants.

There are 5 “wildhouses” original for feeding the deer in the wintertime, with the barn-function on first floor to store the hay for the winter. But they don’t use that function anymore, but just spread it primarily by tractors. The x-carriers in front and behind are provided with horizontal battens in the autumn to hold the hay in the wintertime.

This one is called Schimmelmann’s wildhouse and was build in 1890.

KR Thorkil
Thorkil,
Thank you for the interesting report. I assume that the park would be closed to the public when the hunters are culling the herd. Is this a single annual culling event?
Best regards,
Carl
 

Thorkil

Well-known member
Thorkil,
Thank you for the interesting report. I assume that the park would be closed to the public when the hunters are culling the herd. Is this a single annual culling event?
Best regards,
Carl
Hi Carl, no they don't. I telephoned once to the Danish Nature Agency and got hold of an Chief Forester connected to Dyrehaven, because I felt a bit unsecure, while some time they shot what seemed rather close to me. I asked if there were some days in the week where they didn't shoot. No he answered, while we have to kill around 600 deer a year, its two a day, so we can't take a break. But he could assure me that they knew what they were doing, and has been doing that for the last 300 years without any accident. They always hit them in the heart, 1 shot, one dead animal, they are falling drop-dead all the time. They are not sparetime-hunters, but do it every day, all the year. And they always keep the area behind the deer secure. So I decided to no more feel unsecure. We walk, Irene and I, there 3-4 times every week (when not away) all the year, and a lot of people do so. So it will be more unsecure to drive to the local grocery :)
KR Thorkil
PS. take a look here
sorry, only in danish without subtitles, but you get an idea of the one shot in the heart
 
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scho

Well-known member
Hi Carl, no they don't. I telephoned once to the Danish Nature Agency and got hold of an Chief Forester connected to Dyrehaven, because I felt a bit unsecure, while some time they shot what seemed rather close to me. I asked if there were some days in the week where they didn't shoot. No he answered, while we have to kill around 600 deer a year, its two a day, so we can't take a break. But he could assure me that they knew what they were doing, and has been doing that for the last 300 years without any accident. They always hit them in the heart, 1 shot, one dead animal, they are falling drop-dead all the time. They are not sparetime-hunters, but do it every day, all the year. And they always keep the area behind the deer secure. So I decided to no more feel unsecure. We walk, Irene and I, there 3-4 times every week (when not away) all the year, and a lot of people do so. So it will be more unsecure to drive to the local grocery :)
KR Thorkil
PS. take a look here
sorry, only in danish without subtitles, but you get an idea of the one shot in the heart
Thorkil,
Thank you for the informative video. As you say it seems quite civilized and safe. I participated in a deer culling event at Montezuma National wildlife refuge at the north end of Cayuga Lake one time many years ago when I used to hunt deer with bow and arrow. It was a chaotic, badly organized event and very dangerous with untrained hunters shooting arrows indiscriminately through the trees with no regard for the safety of others around them. I stayed for less than an hour and left, thankful that I wasn't killed.
Best regards,
Carl
 

Thorkil

Well-known member
Thorkil,
Thank you for the informative video. As you say it seems quite civilized and safe. I participated in a deer culling event at Montezuma National wildlife refuge at the north end of Cayuga Lake one time many years ago when I used to hunt deer with bow and arrow. It was a chaotic, badly organized event and very dangerous with untrained hunters shooting arrows indiscriminately through the trees with no regard for the safety of others around them. I stayed for less than an hour and left, thankful that I wasn't killed.
Best regards,
Carl
Carl, yes that sounds uncivilized and very dangerous. Glad you left. When keeping the numbers down one has to do it skilled, professional, precise and as quiet as possible. Luckily they now use silencers, and it all make no fuss and is almost unnoticed.
Kind regards
Thorkil
 
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scho

Well-known member
Some of Cornell's recent grads were lucky to have a beautiful, sunny Memorial day to walk around the arboretum ponds with their parents and friends before leaving the area. All with the Fujifilm GFX 100s and 80/1.7

Houston pond 2 shot stitch

River Birch 3 shot stitch. click for full size.


Dog walkers take notice! I guess dog poop is not good fertilizer for flower gardens.o_O

 
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Thorkil

Well-known member
Very much like the English painter Constable! Lovely shot.
Bill
Thank you Bill !
I had to get some help from Google about Constable, and I can see what you mean :).
Just passing by I expected the deer to fly away, while being rather close, but they were calm and in harmony, so just rushed the camera up.
Only when I got home I realized it reminded me a bit of the spirit in the pictures the famous (at least in Denmark) “golden age” painter Johan Thomas Lundbye (1818-1848, yes died in a war accident only 30 years old), of which I was a huge fan from I was teenager and up. Right now there will be a Lundbye-festival in Denmark this summer and a photocontest inspired by the Golden Age painters universe..
https://lundbyekunstfestival.dk/
 

orftoden

Member
Here's a couple images I took yesterday near Breckenridge, CO. Both were taken with a GFX 100s on an Arca-Swiss M Line 2. The top image was taken with a Rodenstock 60mm HR Digaron-S at f/14. The bottom image was taken with a Schneider 47mm Digitar at F/11. Enjoy!
Breck_1.jpgBreck_2.jpg
 
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