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Fun with the Hasselblad 907x

jotloob

Subscriber Member
Congrats . Hopefully your 907x is flawless . But you can only check that , when you use an XCD lens , due to the contacts (if functional)
With third party lenses the CFV II 50c behaves like it would be attached to a V-SYSTEM camera . And there the CFV works fine .
 

bythewei

Active member
Congrats . Hopefully your 907x is flawless . But you can only check that , when you use an XCD lens , due to the contacts (if functional)
With third party lenses the CFV II 50c behaves like it would be attached to a V-SYSTEM camera . And there the CFV works fine .
I had a 45P, which I returned 3 weeks later. The output is great, but autofocus takes forever to lock focus, and at f/4 it is too slow for me.

I’ll probably consider a 65mm XCD in 2021, but right now I’m having too much fun with my adapted lenses.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
So this bad boy arrived just in time for Christmas. I've used the Contax CY 50mm f1.4 on my GFX system before but I think it is much more compatible with the 907X (looks-wise).

Center sharpness is acceptable wide-open, provided you can nail it. Sharpens up really well at f4/f5.6. I've never been concerned with corner sharpness in 16 years of my photography journey so I didn't check that.

Vignetting is acceptable and correctable at close distance. Near infinity, you will have to toggle the vignetting slider to +2.0 or +3.0 (C1P) or crop 4:5 to be clean. Overall not an issue for the things I shoot.

Raw files of simple sharpness test (f/1.4 & f/5.6) and vignetting (MFD & infinity) here, free for everyone to evaluate: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1yGv0xDTKDuNNSHMS2-U-PDEWkYUcBVrD?usp=sharing

View attachment 179774

I finally managed to get my hands on a Minolta MD to X1D adaptor, pending shipping. Can't wait to adapt my 55mm f/1.7, 45mm f/2 and 100mm f/2.5.
Good, enjoy it. I'll look at your test exposures a little later. (I may replicate your tests with a Summilux-R 50, Summicron-R 50, and Summicron-M 50, just to see how they differ. :) )

What I'm interested to see is what kinds of photos you're going to make at f/1.4-f/2.8 ... That's very shallow depth of field for a 33x44 mm format! :)

G
 

Hausen

Active member
So I decided that I have always been happiest with one camera and one lens so the 35-75 arrived yesterday and I will exit my 21-45-120. Been out this morning with a small bag with just my H&Y filters and 907x + 35-75 and it was heaven. Shot my version of a Christmas tree and as it is Christmas Eve here in NZ, Merry Christmas everyone.Xmas tree.jpg
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I saw this lovely little Lotus Elise on my walk the other day and snapped a front-top-down photo of it ... I had a wide lens and didn't really like the other views of the car with the wide lens.

So I saw it again the other day when I was walking with the Sonnar 150mm lens and took the opportunity.








Pretty car; I'd love to borrow one to play with for a bit. :)

enjoy!
G
 

bythewei

Active member
It's finally here! This Novoflex Minolta X1D adaptor is so difficult to find online, it took me months to actually purchase one.

I've used Minolta lenses with my GFX system and I loved them to bits. This Minolta Rokkor 55mm f/1.7 became my favourite lens with the 44x33 because of my 4 evaluation criteria - sharp, cheap, fast & character. You can learn more about adapting Minolta lenses on 4433 sensors via Jonas Rask's excellent article.

Some sample photos coming up!

Minolta X1D adaptor.png
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
That's a nice old lens ... I remember it from when my friend in high school bought a Minolta SRT-101! It's a very classic looking lens too.
The imaging looks nice ... A little barrel distortion evident in the upper photo, a little corner darkening.

But very nice overall! You're motivating me to experiment with my Leica R 50/1.4 a bit more. :D
 

Paratom

Well-known member
Congrats. The 35-75 has become my fav and most used lens, followed by the 80/1.9. Even if the range of the 35-75 is somewhat limited this lens is so good and flexible that I really enjoy it on my x1dII. How does it balance on the 907x? I woul expect to bequite front heavy? I evaluate to add a 907x to my Hasselblad kit.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Congrats. The 35-75 has become my fav and most used lens, followed by the 80/1.9. Even if the range of the 35-75 is somewhat limited this lens is so good and flexible that I really enjoy it on my x1dII. How does it balance on the 907x? I woul expect to be quite front heavy? I evaluate to add a 907x to my Hasselblad kit.
The 35-75 weighs about a pound more than my 21mm and is similar dimensions. I find the balance quite good, but it depends on what kind of shooting you do. I consider the 907x in much the same way as a 500CM ... a waist level camera primarily ... so I usually flip the screen to level, hold the camera and lens cradled in my left hand, and work the controls with my right hand. Or I put it on a tripod. ;-) The large lens tube presents plenty of area to grip and steady the camera with when used this way.

With the 21mm, I also occasionally fit the OVF and then the Control Grip facilitates handy eye level use, with the easy ability to rotate from landscape to portrait format. In this use, I only look at the LCD for focus checking after exposure and to work the camera's controls with the touch screen. That will be a little more difficult as you get out to the far end of the zoom's range since the OVF is targeted to the 21 to 45 FoV range and you'll need to use the LCD more for basic framing. I don't find it unbalanced with the 21mm, the added pound of the zoom will take more effort to hold steadily used this way.

G
 

Paratom

Well-known member
Thank you Godfrey,
I admit you are one of the persons who inspired me to get the 907x, eventhough I allready have and like and will keep the x1dII (I have to make final decission tomorrow moening when I go to the store)
The expectation is to shoot waistlevel-like with the 907x, and so get different perspectives and enjoy shooting a different way.
One thing I wonder: with a classic waistlevelcamera one can hold/lean the camer-body on the human body to stabilize it. Since the display of the 907x claps out, there will allways be a certain distance between the 907 body and the photographer. How does this feel for you?
I have 21,45,35-75,80 and (still) 90 xcd, som maybe I will use the 907 more with the lighter and smaller lenses, like the 21 or 45.
I might the 90 with a 65 one day.
I hope the 907x will not be one of those "want have" projects for me and I will use it regulary besides my x1dII. I will skip the grip and ovf for now.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I personally never leaned the camera against my body with Hasselblad or Rolleiflex TLR waist level viewing. Instead, I use a neckstrap set to a length that allows me to hold the camera at a comfortable overall viewing distance to stabilize it in low light/longish overall exposure time situations when hand held ... and that is no different between the 500CM and 907x. I'd suggest trying that idea ... it's kinda traditional Rolleiflex TLR lore. :)

Most of my shooting has been with the 45P lens, which is the lightest and shortest XCD lens available. An ultra-wide like the 21 always takes me a couple of sessions to get my eye and brain in gear for, and there've been so many interruptions and constraints in my day-to-day since I got the camera in March that I have only ended up using it for a small number of photos. I adapt to longer focal length lenses more swiftly, so my shooting with adapted 75, 90, 120, 135, 150, and 180 mm lenses has been easier and I've gotten a number of good photos from them. ON the basis of what I see with these focal lengths, my third XCD lens will likely be either the 65 or the 90, and at some point I'll add the 120 Macro. While I like what I get with the 135, 150, and 180 mm quite a lot, I am pretty sure that I'll use a 65 or 90 quite a lot more and would prefer a native lens in this range.

G
 

elm

Member
Paratom,

I am right there with Godfrey. Set the length of the neck strap to a comfortable length to help with the stabilization.

I've had my 907x 50c + 45p since the middle of October and love the size and balance! My intent was to use the 50c II for my V-series cameras/lenses, but I have enjoyed the combination so much that I have not even tried to put the back onto those camera bodies yet. I have been able to use it as a simple point-and-shoot or be more technical with it. (I also purchased the OVF, but haven't even used that either just to keep my kit small and nimble! My intent was to get a 21mm at some point to make the kit more like a SWC. (Since I am a hobbiest and not a working pro, I have to be very selective in my additional purchases.))

If you are thinking of a 907x 50c, give it a try. It might surpise you on how it will complement your X1D II 50C and all your XCD lenses.

Best wishes and let us know what you think when you get a chance to play with it a bit.
 

Paratom

Well-known member
Thanks for the idea with the strap and when I read it I feel that I also used this stabilizing-effect in the past. I think I have just see how it works for me.
Today our life is loaded with consume and all kinds of new gear, and buying a 907x is consume as well for sure, but I feel this camera is really something different.
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
Same way I feel.

I certainly had enough cameras even forgetting about the 500CM sitting in the closet last year when I ordered the 907x SE on its initial announcement. Something about it just spoke to me, and I then thought of how it would bring my old Hassy system into the modern world with a direct digital capture option ... The more I use it, the more delighted I am with my decision to buy. I like using the 907x itself, and using a 500CM fitted with the back is just delightful too.

To make it easier to use the 500CM and shoot both film and digital in the same session, I've now acquired a minty 1977 A16 back for 645 horizontal format. I can easily now carry the 500CM with just a single lens and swap backs as the whimsy strikes me ... The FoV difference is that the film back will net just a hair wider FoV, about 10° on the diagonal with my 50mm lens, less with the longer lenses. I can see one back loaded with Washi-120 film paired alongside the digital back for two absolutely, utterly different views of the same scene. :)

G
 

bythewei

Active member
It's probably just me, but I cannot imagine how can one use the 45P for anything that moves the slightest. The autofocus is ridiculously slow, it hunts for like 2-3 seconds, and the contrast-detect system of the 907X does not help a bit.

I sure hope the 45 f3.5 or the 65 f2.8 performs better....
 

Ai_Print

Active member
If I want to photograph things that move in the slightest I have a 16 lens, 5 body Nikon system for that.

I’ll find out tomorrow how the 45 does for me but even as my only XCD lens on a system I use solely for landscape, architecture and product, I am confident it will be just fine...


It's probably just me, but I cannot imagine how can one use the 45P for anything that moves the slightest. The autofocus is ridiculously slow, it hunts for like 2-3 seconds, and the contrast-detect system of the 907X does not help a bit.

I sure hope the 45 f3.5 or the 65 f2.8 performs better....
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
It's probably just me, but I cannot imagine how can one use the 45P for anything that moves the slightest. The autofocus is ridiculously slow, it hunts for like 2-3 seconds, and the contrast-detect system of the 907X does not help a bit.

I sure hope the 45 f3.5 or the 65 f2.8 performs better....
You don't need autofocus to photograph things that move. I had a small business once upon a time photographing events at motor racing circuits. I used a Nikon F and a Mamiya 1000TL to capture racing cars and motorcycles in action. It takes timing and an understanding of where to place the focus and when to release the shutter. I could do the same with the 907x today. Same goes for shooting photographs of people, and anything else.

I've been doing photography since 1965. I didn't own an autofocus camera at all until about 1999. I still don't use AF very much even today. AF has always been a useful convenience only, when it works for the particular subject at hand, and it is always a convenience. Being slavishly dependent upon autofocus limits what you can do with any camera.

G
 
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