The GetDPI Photography Forum

Great to see you here. Join our insightful photographic forum today and start tapping into a huge wealth of photographic knowledge. Completing our simple registration process will allow you to gain access to exclusive content, add your own topics and posts, share your work and connect with other members through your own private inbox! And don’t forget to say hi!

More and more film fun with something other than a Leica M

ggibson

Well-known member
Stunning landscape, Graham! :D
Thanks, Godfrey! Working with this camera is certainly a learning experience. I had some issues with this film rolling up evenly, and ended up with it curling inside the camera. It was minor in the first couple exposures, and in the image above I had enough to work with to crop it out. This next one though, it extends too much into the central region of the campsite so I published it as-is. Kind of funky, the stuff you only get with analog 🙃


Campsite with a bend in space-time
by Graham Gibson, on Flickr

I have had little time to shoot recently, hope to have some more opportunities to shoot this 6x17. It's tough, as the field of view is quite wide and with only 4 shots per roll, I don't like wasting it. I already loaded my next roll of Ilford Delta 100 to incentivize myself. I like Tri-X 400 a lot for portraits, but I want something more fine-grain for landscapes that I'll be shooting with this camera.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
I'm not familiar with that camera, but can you tighten the take up spool prior to exposure to flatten the film plane? Nice pics.
 

ggibson

Well-known member
Yes, I will take more care with that for this next roll. The film is advanced using a knob that turns the take up spool while viewing the frame number through a window. There is a similar knob on the left that can roll the film roll side--I'll use both in tandem to hopefully keep the film taught.
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
That's what I did with my Fotoman 612. Both knobs would turn to pull any sag in the film plane prior to taking the pic. This makes me want the pano film camera...again.
 

bensonga

Well-known member
From an annual "Show and Shine" car show here in Anchorage, August 2019. This is from the first roll of film I put through a Nikon F4s I had recently acquired. Finally got around to sending the film off to Dwayne's Photo for development and scanning.

Gary




 
Last edited:

pegelli

Well-known member
Great F4 shots on Provia Gary, especially the reds are spectacular (I mean the photo's and not the car, even though that's very nice as well)

Most of my film stuff is B&W, so no vibrant reds in this post.

Here's three "reflections" in Antwerp, All OM4T + Tokina 35-70/2.8, FP4+, developed in 1-shot 1:1 diluted Microphen to iso 200, scanned in negative form on an Epson V700 creating a 16 bit TIFF and then converted to a positive by the Negative Lab Pro plugin in Lightroom.


Bonapartedok



Grain silo on the Asiadok



Idle river cruisers waiting for better times
 

JoelM

Active member
From an annual "Show and Shine" car show here in Anchorage, August 2019. This is from the first roll of film I put through a Nikon F4s I had recently acquired. Finally got around to sending the film off to Dwayne's Photo for development and scanning.

Gary




Ah, nice. Makes me miss my 66 GT350 that I sold back in the early 80s.
Joel
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
Great F4 shots on Provia Gary, especially the reds are spectacular (I mean the photo's and not the car, even though that's very nice as well)

Most of my film stuff is B&W, so no vibrant reds in this post.

Here's three "reflections" in Antwerp, All OM4T + Tokina 35-70/2.8, FP4+, developed in 1-shot 1:1 diluted Microphen to iso 200, scanned in negative form on an Epson V700 creating a 16 bit TIFF and then converted to a positive by the Negative Lab Pro plugin in Lightroom.


Bonapartedok



Grain silo on the Asiadok



Idle river cruisers waiting for better times
Great contrast! I was curious about using the V700. Can't you convert a negative to a positive using the media tab in Epson?
 

pegelli

Well-known member
Great contrast! I was curious about using the V700. Can't you convert a negative to a positive using the media tab in Epson?
Thanks jd, and yes, you can also scan towards a positive in the Epson software however the controls aren't as precise and good as the combination of Negative Lab Pro and Lightroom. It takes much less work this way to get to the rendering as I like it. Only thing is that all the controls in lightroom work "backwards" except for contrast and clarity. However if you really missed the mark in Negative Lab Pro you can also go back to those controls as well in a fully non destructive fashion, just like lightroom it's just a series of commands and doesn't change anything to the original file.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
A walk at Byxbee Park with the Hasselblad, shooting a roll of Washi-120 W (orthochromatic emulsion on washi rice paper backing).


Pole Farm - Byxbee Park, Palo Alto 2020
Hasselblad 500CM + Makro-Planar CF 120mm f/4 T*
Washi-120 W film :: ISO 6 @ f/5.6 @ 1/4 sec
Transmission Scan

Comments always appreciated.

enjoy! G
 

jdphoto

Well-known member
A walk at Byxbee Park with the Hasselblad, shooting a roll of Washi-120 W (orthochromatic emulsion on washi rice paper backing).


Pole Farm - Byxbee Park, Palo Alto 2020
Hasselblad 500CM + Makro-Planar CF 120mm f/4 T*
Washi-120 W film :: ISO 6 @ f/5.6 @ 1/4 sec
Transmission Scan

Comments always appreciated.

enjoy! G
Love this photo! I'm starting to lean towards the "Fine Art" aspect of photography and this really appeals to me. This should be on a gallery wall with a price to match. Nicely done!
How do you develop this film and what's a transmission scan?
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Thank you!

Washi-120 "W" is produced by Film Washi (https://filmwashi.com/en/) along with a few other interesting films. There are several different ways to process it, chemistry-wise, and the one they recommend uses a paper developer that is mostly unavailable in the USA. So I use Ilford Multigrade Paper Developer, mixed 1:9, for about 4 minutes or so. That nets a ISO rating of between 3 and 6.

The film is essentially very thin rice paper and has no structural rigidity when wet, so they recommend open tray development. I don't have a darkroom so that's impossible for me; I use a 1950s type Kodacraft 120 developing tank with the "lasagna" plastic strip to process it in ... the plastic keeps the paper from folding into a useless little ball. I made a couple of toothpick reinforcements to keep it spread flat for drying in my usual hanging setup in the shower booth. d

A transmission scan is the standard way of scanning or printing a negative: Shine a light through the negative and record it on the opposite side. Because it is thin rice paper, this reveals the structure of the paper... all the fibers, etc. The other way to scan these negatives, because they are essentially negative images on very thin paper when dry, is to use reflected light in a flat bed scanner. This poses a completely different look and feel since you're recording the image along with the reflected paper surface. I'll be posting some examples in a little bit.

Fun stuff. I bought about a dozen and a half rolls of Washi 120 back in 2015 and have been slowly consuming it. I'm going to order another dozen or two. It's really fun, if a bit tricky to deal with. And I love the way the images feel.

G
 
Top