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907x 50c now available

Godfrey

Well-known member
Indeed... unsurprisingly, his biggest criticism! 😂

I think the shift button concept is quite ingenious. As the original Hasselblad 500 concept was right hand focussing / left hand shutter release, this would also mean left hand for the 907X control dial, but right hand to press the shift button?

To me, to use the right hand for both control dial and shift button feels utterly unergonomic. What do you reckon?

Anyway, I'd like a long press of the shift button to be an extra function, e.g. DOF preview! ;) That would make a great deal of sense to me.
Further, it could be a different function depending on whether you are on the main screen or focussing with the preview screen.
Hm? All the Hasselblad 500, etc, SLRs have their shutter release on the lower right as you're holding the camera with the lens pointed towards your subject, exactly the same as the 907x. I cradle the 500CM with the left hand, work the focusing ring (and exposure controls) with the left hand's thumb and forefinger, release the shutter with the right index finger, wind the film/cock the shutter with the right hand.

handling_500CM.JPG

With the 907x, I do the same except that with the exposure controls and autofocus, the left hand serves mainly to cradle the camera, where the right hand can also work the focusing ring in manual focus. The right hand also works the control dial and shift button: for instance, in A mode, you adjust aperture with the control dial using the right index finger, EV compensation by holding the shift button with the thumb while turning the control dial with the index finger, and then it's a short move back to the shutter release to release the shutter.

If the shift button could be a toggle, and there was a concept of the short press-long press, then you could do the short press for control dial mode switch and long press for DOF Preview. But with the present setup (shift button only operates the mode change while held down), there is no concept of a long press to work with since how long you need for other operations of shift-control dial are indeterminate. Not a bad idea though.

I reported the lack of functionality of the DoF Preview function on the Control Grip to Hasselblad USA customer service. The tech there tested and found the same on his camera, so a note has been sent off to Hasselblad engineering in Sweden to see if there's something about using this function we don't know or if this is a bug/unimplemented feature. It seems to me assuredly a bug... :)

G
 

jng

Well-known member
Hm? All the Hasselblad 500, etc, SLRs have their shutter release on the lower right as you're holding the camera with the lens pointed towards your subject, exactly the same as the 907x. I cradle the 500CM with the left hand, work the focusing ring (and exposure controls) with the left hand's thumb and forefinger, release the shutter with the right index finger, wind the film/cock the shutter with the right hand.

G
For some (including myself), the preferred method is to focus with the right hand and cradle the body with the left hand, with the left index or even middle finger on the shutter release. Clearly a matter of personal preference (not to mention muscle memory)!

John
 
release the shutter with the right index finger
I typically do the same, but if you have a look at the 500C Instruction Manual (available on My Hasselblad), it is the left index finger at the shutter button while holding the camera entirely in the left hand. That is the originally intended posture...

For the 907X, you could almost reach the shift button with your left index finger, but I suppose it is to be operated with the right thumb (I don‘t believe it is described in the 907X User Manual after all).
 

sog1927

Member
For some (including myself), the preferred method is to focus with the right hand and cradle the body with the left hand, with the left index or even middle finger on the shutter release. Clearly a matter of personal preference (not to mention muscle memory)!

John
That's how I always did it.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I have the 500CM/SWC manual right here, and I see their instructions for the left hand grip. Sorry, but the camera is MUCH less stable in my hands when I try to combine supporting the camera with releasing the shutter in just the one hand, and working the focus, exposure, and winding on is very awkward the way they suggest placing your hands. Whatever works for you is fine by me, just don't suggest that's how I do it... :)

I'd never read their instructions on holding the camera before. I bought my first 500CM about 25 years ago and just handle it as my hands tell me is stable and comfortable.

Speaking of holding the camera, I did my first walk with the 907x using the control grip and OVF. I walked for about two miles with it, fitted with the XCD 21mm, and made a good number of exposures. The grip and OVF make it feel quite a lot larger in the hands, but they do make it much more stable for casual shooting and framing. It's like working with a completely different camera in many ways.

G
 
I'd never read their instructions on holding the camera before. I bought my first 500CM about 25 years ago and just handle it as my hands tell me is stable and comfortable.
I know what you mean and I don‘t imply that you are doing anything wrong. I just realize that their suggested way of working with the camera is a very little known fact about the V system in general.

My point is just, coming from the Hasselblad instructions for the 500 series, how would it extrapolate to the use of the shift button? Since in the old design, there was no control element present in that spot on the lateral side. What do you think?

I‘d really be interested in mastering the ergonomics of the standalone 907X.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I know what you mean and I don‘t imply that you are doing anything wrong. I just realize that their suggested way of working with the camera is a very little known fact about the V system in general.

My point is just, coming from the Hasselblad instructions for the 500 series, how would it extrapolate to the use of the shift button? Since in the old design, there was no control element present in that spot on the lateral side. What do you think?

I‘d really be interested in mastering the ergonomics of the standalone 907X.
In over 25 years, I had never before read that portion of the 500CM manual... :D

As I said previously: Cradle the 907x sans Control Grip with the left hand to support and stabilize it. To work the control dial, rotate it with the right hand index finger in either direction. To work the shift-control dial function, press the button with your thumb and rotate the control dial with your index finger. Release the shutter with the right-hand index finger. BTW: There's an option in the preferences to let the control dial setting (for EV Compensation) reset after an exposure or stick through multiple exposures. I use the latter setting, because I tend to use the same setting for a couple of exposures at a time.

In my opinion, the best setup for a 907x sans Control Grip has a 'simple grip' tightly fitted on the left side of the camera and angled to allow a natural position of the left hand with the LCD deployed to 45° or 90° for waist level operation. I'm still making my 'simple grip'...

G
 

sog1927

Member
I have the 500CM/SWC manual right here, and I see their instructions for the left hand grip. Sorry, but the camera is MUCH less stable in my hands when I try to combine supporting the camera with releasing the shutter in just the one hand, and working the focus, exposure, and winding on is very awkward the way they suggest placing your hands. Whatever works for you is fine by me, just don't suggest that's how I do it... :)

I'd never read their instructions on holding the camera before. I bought my first 500CM about 25 years ago and just handle it as my hands tell me is stable and comfortable.

Speaking of holding the camera, I did my first walk with the 907x using the control grip and OVF. I walked for about two miles with it, fitted with the XCD 21mm, and made a good number of exposures. The grip and OVF make it feel quite a lot larger in the hands, but they do make it much more stable for casual shooting and framing. It's like working with a completely different camera in many ways.

G
I suspect my preference for holding it the other way might be due to my left-handedness. It's not like it's a religious issue or anything, it just felt better that way to me.
 

Tim Floyd

Member
Interesting "review" by Kai where he starts out clearly knowing nothing about the camera (not even model number) but by the end of the video is smitten with it. I don't normally like these kind of videos but this one really brought out some of the strengths of the camera.
 

spb

Well-known member
I cannot call that a review, I do not care for his jokey deliveries. I do agree that he did at least show some of the strengths of the camera.

This is a much more professional and informative review: Sonder Creative here we get to see the Grip, Viewfinder and flash in action.
 
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elm

New member
Do all of you use the two SD card slots on the CFVII 50c and how are you assigning what to do with the second SD? Are you all using the same capacity in both? Any advice? Thank you in advance.
 
Do all of you use the two SD card slots on the CFVII 50c and how are you assigning what to do with the second SD? Are you all using the same capacity in both? Any advice? Thank you in advance.
Keep in mind that the CFV II 50C becomes really slow if it is not equipped with a UHS-II card (implies you are going to use RAW data). Files are massive at a combined 120MB for RAW+JPG per frame. This easily tops out the fastest SD cards with around 300MB/s write speed at three frames per second! If you have slower cards, you have to wait much longer for all read or write operations to finish; preview of files at full resolution is also affected.

I am not a professional shooter, so I have my 2 cards in overflow mode, with an old 8GB card as backup whenever the main 32GB card isn't installed. Coming from the 500C/M, I am also not in the habit of shooting lots of frames per session, so the small capacity is fine for my use.
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
I have not had reason to use two cards loaded simultaneously yet. I generally use 64 and 128 G capacity cards, and capture raw files only. The files average 106 MB apiece, a 128 G card should be able to capture something on the order of 1200 exposures before becoming full and I only very rarely make more than 50-100 exposures in a session.

So if I were to use the second card slot, my goal would likely be for it to do duty as a backup. I'll likely never make 1200 plus exposures in any session I'm going to do. I'd likely put two of the same cards into the slots if I were to do that ... Less confusion, etc. :)

BTW: None of my cards (from an ancient 40MB/s Sandisk Ultra to my fastest 250MB/s Lexar Pro 1667x UHS II) ever brings up the "slow card" warning, and all of them work just fine for any amount of single frame still capture work that I've done. All of them write within the time it takes me to be ready for the next shot. Any SDHC/SDXC card in the Sandisk Extreme PRO speed class nowadays should work just fine, and lots of slower cards will too; you don't necessarily need the expensive UHS-II class cards for most things.

G
 
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docholliday

Active member
So if I were to use the second card slot, my goal would likely be for it to do duty as a backup. I'll likely never make 1200 plus exposures in any session I'm going to do. I'd likely put two of the same cards into the slots if I were to do that ... Less confusion, etc. :)

G
Usually, it's best to NOT have the same brand and batch for cards, especially when using them for redundancy purposes. I had a set of 4 Sandisk Pro 128GB CF cards that all had problems within a short period. Two were in use at a time, and the others were backup. I also had 4 Lexar 1066x 128GB cards. I had put the 1 of the Sandisks in slot 1 and a Lexar in slot 2 in a pair of 1Dx bodies. When the first Sandisk went down, it had controller problems and started hanging the CF interface. I simply shut off card 1 and went on shooting. On the second body a few days later, shooting went fine, but the card produced corrupted files on download. I pulled the Lexar and dumped it instead without issue. If I'd had the same cards in the body, I'd been hosed. Extended stress testing on the remaining two cards resulted in errors from them. Sandisk replaced all 4 cards and things have been good since. I also had the same type of issue with a pair of 32GB Transcend cards back in the day.

In most of my SAS raid clusters, I tend to mix 4 of one brand with 4 of another for the RAID build. I've had issues on servers where one drive would die and another of the same brand/batch would die during rebuild. RAID 60 can tolerate more than drive dead, but not more than two and rebuilds are the most critical time + stress for drives. Staggering the disks with different manufacturers has prevented the same failure from requiring the slow-as-molasses restore from tape (the last-in-line backup).

Also, solid state memory controllers (mostly) have a write-leveling algorithm to reduce write cycle wear. Filling up a smaller card wears out the card faster and is more prone to errors. It's best to use larger cards and write less to them when wanting to get the best reliability and longevity out of them. There's a lot of boxes I've had to work on where somebody thought they'd be cheap and by the smallest SSD they could find, but then wonder why the drive died prematurely because they had the drive filled > 75% capacity. Though I'm using 128GB cards in the 1Dx bodies, I rarely get more than 32GB or so of images on them before dumping. And that's only when I've been out for multiple days without access to a computer or power.
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
I can't say anything plus or minus to your experience, docholiday. However, my experience over about 17 years and over three-quarters of a million exposures with SD cards is that I have never had any cards become unusable at all. I've had the occasional file or access glitch: I've always been able to retrieve all my work and reformat the card. I have every SD card I've ever purchased, all the way back to 2003/2004, and all of them are still 100% functional and usable (albeit many of the older ones are too small a capacity to be useful for 50 Mpixel cameras).

I've never done anything special with the cards.. always bought in doubles or quartets of the same product and just put them to work. I've always bought Sandisk and other quality name brands from reliable sources. As a result, I really and truly do not worry one bit about the cards at all. They just commodities to me. ;)

G
 
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docholliday

Active member
I can't say anything plus or minus to your experience, docholiday. However, my experience over about 17 years and over three-quarters of a million exposures with SD cards is that I have never had any cards become unusable at all. I've had the occasional file or access glitch: I've always been able to retrieve all my work and reformat the card. I have every SD card I've ever purchased, all the way back to 2003/2004, and all of them are still 100% functional and usable (albeit many of the older ones are too small a capacity to be useful for 50 Mpixel cameras).

I've never done anything special with the cards.. always bought in doubles or quartets of the same product and just put them to work. I've always bought Sandisk and other quality name brands from reliable sources. As a result, I really and truly do not worry one bit about the cards at all. They just commodities to me. ;)

G
My post wasn't really about the reliability of the cards, although I've had dozens of cards fail starting way back in 2000 with the MicroDrives and early CF. Most of those were in embedded appliances, routers, and industrial CNC applications. I have had a share of cards die throughout the years of hard use in 1D cameras. I've never had anything that used SD other than a few oscilloscopes and FLAC players. I've spent dozens of hours doing nothing but RMA'ing card media, SSDs, HDDs, and RAM.

My post was about the concept in computing of (not) relying on (and trusting) a single manufacturer and batch when requiring redundancy and reliability, just like the old wisdom of never shooting a wedding on a 70mm back. One mistake and you've lost a whole event whereas shooting on A12 or A24 gave you better odds of salvaging enough to still constructively finish the job. I was one of those who took the effort and time to file unique notches into every A12, A24, and E12 back so if I had a light leak or mis-spacing, I knew exactly which back it came from. (y)
 
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cgastelum

Member
So my 907x /CFV50 is in Hasselblad's hospital this week. in the meantime this new member of the family has been keeping me company. (it is quite a step up from my rusty old 500c)
By the way, the DAL-1 L bracket and the small rig wooden handle look good on this setup too.

IMG_3127.jpg
 

spb

Well-known member
I can't say anything plus or minus to your experience, docholiday. However, my experience over about 17 years and over three-quarters of a million exposures with SD cards is that I have never had any cards become unusable at all. I've had the occasional file or access glitch: I've always been able to retrieve all my work and reformat the card. I have every SD card I've ever purchased, all the way back to 2003/2004, and all of them are still 100% functional and usable (albeit many of the older ones are too small a capacity to be useful for 50 Mpixel cameras).

I've never done anything special with the cards.. always bought in doubles or quartets of the same product and just put them to work. I've always bought Sandisk and other quality name brands from reliable sources. As a result, I really and truly do not worry one bit about the cards at all. They just commodities to me. ;)

G
My experience is much the same, out of who knows how many cards, I have had one failure. I used to use Sandisk. Since about 2 years I use Lexar and Angelbird UHS II cards. No issues.
 

jotloob

Subscriber Member
So my 907x /CFV50 is in Hasselblad's hospital this week. in the meantime this new member of the family has been keeping me company. (it is quite a step up from my rusty old 500c)
By the way, the DAL-1 L bracket and the small rig wooden handle look good on this setup too.

View attachment 176891
Hello
Can you please tell , whats the cause for 907x/CFV50c sending for repair ? ? ?
Did you send it directly to HASSELBLAD in SWEDEN ? ? ?
 
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Godfrey

Well-known member
My post wasn't really about the reliability of the cards, although I've had dozens of cards fail starting way back in 2000 with the MicroDrives and early CF. Most of those were in embedded appliances, routers, and industrial CNC applications. I have had a share of cards die throughout the years of hard use in 1D cameras. I've never had anything that used SD other than a few oscilloscopes and FLAC players. I've spent dozens of hours doing nothing but RMA'ing card media, SSDs, HDDs, and RAM.

My post was about the concept in computing of (not) relying on (and trusting) a single manufacturer and batch when requiring redundancy and reliability, just like the old wisdom of never shooting a wedding on a 70mm back. One mistake and you've lost a whole event whereas shooting on A12 or A24 gave you better odds of salvaging enough to still constructively finish the job. I was one of those who took the effort and time to file unique notches into every A12, A24, and E12 back so if I had a light leak or mis-spacing, I knew exactly which back it came from. (y)
Well, isn't that about "the reliability of the cards" and your trust in a manufacturer's products? ;)

Since I've nearly always used cameras with just one card slot, and usually just use one card even with my cameras that have two, and never had ANY issues with two cards purchased at the same time from the same vendor from the same manufacturer, etc etc ... I'm just not going to get terribly worried about it.

I'm no longer taking photograph jobs for pay, so that does influence my thinking about this stuff now. When I was taking jobs for pay, I always had backup with me for every job. It's just not an issue now ... If the equipment goes belly up in the middle of a session, I just plan to do something else. LOL! :D
 
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