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The great tripod & head thread!

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
As much as I love the P0 design, I've found it a floppy head. In that weight range, the RRS BH-30 does remarkably well. Even better is if you can get away with just a geared leveling base like the L60 (AKA MicroCube)

BTW, my "scientific" test was to take a 2 second exposure with a GF 250/4 on a GFX 100 and tap the lens. This showed me the magnificence of the RRS 1-series at the light end, and a Gitzo 4 series with Cube or L75 at the other. I also used a seismometer app to check vibration decay. It's why I got rid of my Novoflex tripods. They rang like a bell. A 3 series Gitzo had twice the damping factor as the Novy Pro-75. I should have done the "stomp on the floor" test as well. Unfortunately, I have downstairs neighbors. :LOL:

In the end, though, it comes down to which tripods stay at home and which come with you.
 

nameBrandon

Well-known member
As much as I love the P0 design, I've found it a floppy head. In that weight range, the RRS BH-30 does remarkably well. Even better is if you can get away with just a geared leveling base like the L60 (AKA MicroCube)

BTW, my "scientific" test was to take a 2 second exposure with a GF 250/4 on a GFX 100 and tap the lens. This showed me the magnificence of the RRS 1-series at the light end, and a Gitzo 4 series with Cube or L75 at the other. I also used a seismometer app to check vibration decay. It's why I got rid of my Novoflex tripods. They rang like a bell. A 3 series Gitzo had twice the damping factor as the Novy Pro-75. I should have done the "stomp on the floor" test as well. Unfortunately, I have downstairs neighbors. :LOL:

In the end, though, it comes down to which tripods stay at home and which come with you.
Brilliant.. off to find a seismometer app..! :)

I'll be curious to evaluate the tripods alone, and then with the various heads I have to see the potential impact. Good to hear the Gitzo 3/4 series did so well! You didn't test the FLM tripods did you? That CP-38 II looks interesting given the price point.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
Well, I'm going walking with the Hasselblad 500CM now. I've got it fitted with the 80mm lens and a roll of 100 speed film in the A16 back. I'll use the PD Travel Tripod and see how it fares.

G
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
FYI, This is the link to the article I was talking about. It gives you a really good idea of what type of a tripod you actually need.
Their test assumes a constant wind. I would like to see the results on an actual windy day - with gusts, and possible resonant frequencies. In any event, I would want to double their required stiffness. Fortunately, that's not hard to achieve at wide to medium focal lengths.
 

Abstraction

Active member
You could double it fairly easily and without breaking a bank. What these tests show is that the stiffness requirements are pretty low unless you're dealing with some serious wind.
 

nameBrandon

Well-known member
Out of curiosity, how do you all take something like a larger Gitzo series 4/5 tripod that only folds down to 29" or so on an airplane? I guess it might fit in some really big luggage piece, but if it was just myself traveling, I probably wouldn't have very much/large luggage.

Clearly this is why travel tripods exist, but curious what one does if they're not willing to compromise on the tripod.. Travel bag for the tripod and check it as luggage?
 
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dchew

Well-known member
Out of curiosity, how do you all take something like a larger Gitzo series 4/5 tripod that only folds down to 29" or so on an airplane? I guess it might fit in some really big luggage piece, but if it was just myself traveling, I probably wouldn't have very much/large luggage.

Clearly this is why travel tripods exist, but curious what one does if they're not willing to compromise on the tripod.. Travel bag for the tripod and check it as luggage?
Whenever I travel with a tripod I check a bag. It is the primary criteria for the size of checked luggage I buy. Roller bag duffels are my goto for checked luggage because they are longer in general. I am not willing to use a tripod shorter than a 24L.
Dave
 

nameBrandon

Well-known member
Whenever I travel with a tripod I check a bag. It is the primary criteria for the size of checked luggage I buy. Roller bag duffels are my goto for checked luggage because they are longer in general. I am not willing to use a tripod shorter than a 24L.
Dave
I don't have any roller duffles, didn't even occur to me. Great solution!

Not taking anything shorter than a 24L? I like your style, sir. :cool:
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
I have carried-on tripods up to 30" long when folded in a tripod bag, it becomes my "personal item".

However, my Feisol CT3442 legs fold to 19 x 5" and fit in my usual carry-on rollaway if I think I need a large, tall tripod, and the PD Travel Tripod is smaller than that, only 16 x 3.5" folded in its case, and fits into even my small backpack. I only very rarely need more than one of these two tripods for anything: they do a fine job for my photography with even my heaviest, largest, longest-lensed kit (Hasselblad 500CM + Sonnar 150mm + CFVII 50c).

While I admire you guys who go traipsing off into the mountains and woods, setting up gear in driving wind and lashing rain storms on steep slopes adjacent to the precipice, I'm not a landscape photographer: it's not my thing to do it... :)

G
 

dchew

Well-known member
Here is one example, but there are countless other brands and sizes:
I try to find ones that are not too heavy, but that is a problem with roller duffels. 10 lbs is pretty typical for this size. This is the largest one I have because I might have boots, tripod(s), ice axe, trekking poles, tent, etc. For trips in the wheelhouse of what Godfrey described above. :D

I also have this one, which is half the weight and still holds a 24L if you remove the head:

Dave
 

nameBrandon

Well-known member
While I admire you guys who go traipsing off into the mountains and woods, setting up gear in driving wind and lashing rain storms on steep slopes adjacent to the precipice, I'm not a landscape photographer: it's not my thing to do it... :)
No traipsing necessary.. I bought a "project" SUV and did a bunch of off-road modifications to support my landscape photography efforts.. :) Gets me most of the way there!

216447656_800263839544_2724778383021785946_n.jpg


Here is one example, but there are countless other brands and sizes:
I try to find ones that are not too heavy, but that is a problem with roller duffels. 10 lbs is pretty typical for this size. This is the largest one I have because I might have boots, tripod(s), ice axe, trekking poles, tent, etc. For trips in the wheelhouse of what Godfrey described above. :D

I also have this one, which is half the weight and still holds a 24L if you remove the head:
Fantastic, thank you!!
 

anyone

Well-known member
No traipsing necessary.. I bought a "project" SUV and did a bunch of off-road modifications to support my landscape photography efforts.. :) Gets me most of the way there!
Now that's a whole new level of photography-related GAS!

To be not completely offtopic: most of my work with a tech cam I do with a series 3 Gitzo. The series 5 I use almost exclusively with long lenses. And sometimes I even take a Gitzo series 1 with the tech cam, if it has little wind.
 

Godfrey

Well-known member
No traipsing necessary.. I bought a "project" SUV and did a bunch of off-road modifications to support my landscape photography efforts.. :) Gets me most of the way there!
Sounds like Brett Weston ... I think it was him who said that if a viewpoint to shoot from was more than 20 yards from where he could park the car, it simply wasn't interesting enough. ;)

G
 

docholliday

Active member
Sounds like Brett Weston ... I think it was him who said that if a viewpoint to shoot from was more than 20 yards from where he could park the car, it simply wasn't interesting enough. ;)

G
It's not that it's not interesting...you just don't have enough assistants (the truly functional camera bags)!
 

MGrayson

Subscriber and Workshop Member
I'm a hand-held shooter 99% of the time. But the more I think about the LF photographers I've seen, the more I realize how much their PoV mattered, and why so many had stepladders next to their very tall tripods. (AA had a platform on top of his car!)
 

nameBrandon

Well-known member
I'm a hand-held shooter 99% of the time. But the more I think about the LF photographers I've seen, the more I realize how much their PoV mattered, and why so many had stepladders next to their very tall tripods. (AA had a platform on top of his car!)
I'm driving out to Colorado in a month, and then driving out to Glacier National Park in Montana in September for a photo tour, will definitely be shooting from the top of the car when I spot good shots from the roadside.
 
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